Duke runs for reelection as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu, 1936.

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

Kahanamoku, scion of one of the few remaining full-blooded Hawaiian families in the islands, was responsible for returning the sheriff’s office, for the first 25 years of city and county government always held by a Democrat, to the Democratic fold after it had lapsed momentarily into the hands of the Republicans with results that are too well known and too well remembered by every resident of Hawaii to repeat here.

Perhaps the most famous living exponent of the Hawaiian race is Duke P. Kahanamoku, who first spread the name of the Territory over the newspapers and magazines of the world by his swimming prowess and is now seeking re-election as sheriff of the city and county of Honolulu on the Democratic ticket.

For Sheriff

DUKE P. KAHANAMOKU

The Duke first took the world by storm when, and absolutely unknown, he went to the quadrennial Olympic games as one of the American team and made a clean sweep of all the swimming events in which he was entered, establishing several world’s records that stood for many years. He repeated this performance in the following Olympic games and ruled supreme in acquatic affairs until his voluntary retirement from active competition.

On his return to Hawaii the gratitude of the citizens of the Territory was expressed in the form of a public fund which was used to provide a residence for the Kahanamoku family.

The Duke declares in his speeches that he carries on the duties of sheriff of the city and county in the clean and sportsmanlike manner which distinguished his athletic career.

Despite inadequate appropriations provided for the greatly needed new construction at the city and county jail, which is under the jurisdiction of the sheriff’s office, Kahanamoku has established an efficient record in the conduct of this institution—a record on which he is asking renomination at re-election.

“I am a man of few words,” the Duke declares. “When I was representing Hawaii against the best swimmers in the world, I never predicted that I would win any particular race—but I think I won my share. It is the same with the present race for the sheriff’s office.”

[Duke seems to have followed in the footsteps of his father. Duke P. Kahanamoku’s father, Duke K. Kahanamoku served in various positions in the police department, ultimately reaching the rank of captain.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 9/24/1936, p. 1)

Duke Kahanamoku Asks Sheriff Re-election On Basis of Present Record

The Hawaii Democrat, Volume 9, Number 24, Page 1. September 24, 1936.

Advertisements

Democratic candidates, 1910.

W. S. EDINGS, For Senator

M. E. SILVA, For Supervisor

E. K. RATHBURN, 4th District

SOLOMON MEHEULA, For Representative, 4th District

W. P. JARRETT, For Sheriff

CHARLES H. ROSE, For Deputy Sheriff of Honolulu

H. H. PLEMER, For Supervisor

WADE WARREN THAYER, For City and County Attorney

F. COSTA BENEVEDES, For Representative, 4th District

J. S. KALAKIELA, For Senator

W. M. McCLELLAN, For Supervisor

E. H. F. WOLTERS, For Representative, 4th District

J. C. ANDERSON, For Auditor

EDWARD HANAPI, For Senator

FRED TURRILL, For Representative, 4th District

M. C. PACHECO, For Supervisor

[This is an interesting group of Democratic candidates for the race in 1910.]

(Democrat, 11/5/1910, p. 4)

PAGE 4

The Democrat, Volume I, Number 11, Page 4. November 5, 1910.

More on Hattie L. S. Reinhardt and politics, 1944.

Vote For

Hattie L. Saffery
REINHARDT
Linohaupuaokekoolau

DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE
FOR ELECTION

The Only
Woman Representative
For East Hawaii

Election
SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 1944

Should I be elected I will work for:

1. Benefit the state of our public schools here in East Hawaii.

2. Deal with the obstacles of girls and boys who have not yet reached adulthood.

3. Physical education in our Parks and grounds.

This is a woman born on Maui, and lived in Honokaa, Hamakua, Hawaii for over 50 years.

She had the occupation of school teacher for many years at Kapulena, Hamakua, and after that, she served as a teacher at Honokaa High School. She retired after teaching for 39 years.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/27/1944, p. 2)

E Koho Ia Hattie L. Saffery

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIX, Number 23, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 27, 1944.

Letter from Iosepa, Utah, 1913.

A VOICE FROM UTAH.

Iosepa, Toole County. Dec. 19, 1912.

Solomon Hanohano, Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha oe:—Because I want to know the news of the land of our birth, the desire to get a subscription to the Kuokoa grew. Being the the new year is coming, it would be a means for me to see the news of our home and the progress of the political scene or its regression, as well as the victories or discouragements of our fellow makaainana.

Not because Iosepa lacks newspaper subscribers, but for me to get a personal one.

This is one of the important years regarding the nation, being that the leadership of the power of the nation went to the Democrats; the big question is just this: Will the poor makaainana really benefit, or will they be left unstable once again like during the presidency of Cleveland, but it is only time that will tell.

If those elected could follow through on what their lips pledge to the masses, then we indeed will be blessed, however if it is like what Isaiah said, thusly: “These people come near to me with their mouth, but their hearts are far from me.” [Isaiah 29:13] Then comes those famous words of that old timer of Lahaina: “Saying, when indeed will that happen.” [“I mai hoi, ahea la ka hoi.”] The big-eyed images know that the small-eyed images are not watched. [Ikeia aku la no na kii maka nunui, nana oleia iho la na wahi kii maka liilii ??]

My aloha to the few Hawaiian makaainana left who are squeezed and assimilated [i ka opaia aku ua pili pu ?] until they are totally gone from the beloved face of Hawaii, along with the increase of the other races upon the land. And so too with the various diseases of the different races whose devastation spread to our people who lack immunity. Aloha to our people.

As for our living in this unfamiliar land, this land that true Mormons know as the chosen land, and a land to foster the believers in that one faith, all of the Hawaiians are in good health as well as the Samoans, from the old to the young.

I have faith that Iosepa will become a place where Hawaiians will multiply once again, and that these valleys will become full of true Hawaiians and Samoans, when the children are born, and grow up, and marry and give birth.

Some proof of this belief is the great desire of the president of the Mormons for the youths to marry of their own race so that this land is full of Hawaiians. For according to him, it is here that the people of the islands of the ocean will spread.

The town of Iosepa is growing. The church is building homes for the people without homes, lest they live in disarray as the Hawaiians before, with two or three families in a single dwelling.

The workers are paid a dollar every Saturday. The children are taught in the school here in Iosepa. Two children graduated from the local school of Iosepa, and are attending high school, they are Joseph H. Bird and William Pukahi, both are true Hawaiians.

I have been just chosen as judge, and George K. Hubbell as sheriff of the district. We are both Republicans, which also are the majority of the Hawaiians here.

Perhaps this will do.

Charles J. Broad.

Iosepa, Toole County, Utah.

(Kuokoa, 1/10/1913, p. 6)

HE LEO MAI UTAH MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIX, Helu 2, Aoao 6. Ianuari 10, 1913.