Mele reworked, 1918.

HOOHENO NA KA HAE AMERIKA

Ia oe e ka la e alohi nei,
Ma na welelau a o ka honua,
Hoike mai oe i kou nani,
O ka hae aloha o Amerika; Continue reading

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Commemorating Hawaii’s role in WWI, 1919.

THIS IS THE STATUE SCULPTED BY BURNHAM TO COMMEMORATE THE MILITARY SERVICE OF HAWAIIANS IN THE WAR.

In the middle is the commemorative statue for Hawaii’s part it took in the war that was sculpted by the sculptor Roger Noble Burnham. This is that statue that is intended to be placed outside of Kapiolani Park in the area set aside for it by the legislature.

This is the Memorial that Hawaii wanted to stand for all times, something for the people to look upon. On one side of the sculpture is a war leader, and on the other side, a Hawaiian girl. Beneath this is a soldier on one side and a sailor on the other side.

(Kuokoa, 5/16/1919, p. 1)

Kuokoa_5_16_1919_1.png

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 20, Aoao 1. Mei 16, 1919.

A mele by the “Solomon” of Hawaii, William J. Sheldon, 1918.

A MELE FOR THE HAWAIIAN BOYS.

Here again is this mele which was composed for the Hawaiian boys who just left Hawaii for America to join the armed forces of the nation, to try all means to obtain peace in the future, and the composer recalls the famous words of the Conqueror of the Nation of Hawaii nei, “Law of the Splintered Paddle: let the old men and the old women go and lie by the roads, no one is to disturb them.”

These lines of mele were composed in English by our friend and famous composer of songs of these days, and in other words, the “Solomon,” Hon. William J. Sheldon (Kelekona). The music will be available soon as it is now being edited with great care.

I.

Farewell, farewell dear Hawaii,
Sweet land of song and aloha
Thy sons to duty’s call go forth,
To the front thy honor to bear.

Chorus:

Boys, when you get over there,
Don’t forget Hawaii aloha
For you, we will ever pray
That freedom and liberty be won.

II.

Thou are brave sons of Hawaii,
True to your country’s call,
Let Hawaii’s fame be known,
O Hawaii no ka oi.

(Aloha Aina, 6/21/1918, p. 2)

HE MELE NO NA KEIKI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXIII, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Iune 21, 1918.

Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

Red Cross knitting drive, 1917.

Red Cross Knitting

The increasing number of knitters in the service of the Red Cross necessitates the publication of the following:

KNITTING DIRECTIONS

Because of a difference in knitting needle sizes in the United States—there being three manufacturers’ gauges which, unfortunately, do not correspond, the Pacific Division of the American Red Cross ask that the women follow the printed directions as near as possible, but try out their needles and yarn to see just what measurement a definite number of stitches gives them.

Following are the sizes the articles should be.

SLEEVELESS SWEATERS

Length 25 inches.
Width across chest from 16 to 20 inches, preferably 18 inches.

MUFFLER

11 inches wide.
68 inches long—(3 yards even more acceptable.)

MITTENS, OR LONG WRISTLETS

12 inches long.
Openifig should be 3 inches from top.

SOCKS

Length should be 11 inches from top of leg to division of heel.
Width of leg and of foot—4 inches.
Foot 10½ inches to 12 inches.
(11 and 11½ inches average length.)

SLEEVELESS SWEATER.
Materials required—2½hanks knitting yarn.
No. 5 Needles.

Cast on 96 stitches.
Knit 2, purl 2 for 3 inches.
Knit until it measures 25 inches from the beginning.
Make neck hole as follows:
Knit 35 stitches, bind off 26, knit 35.
Knit 7 ribs on each side (over and back is a rib)
Knit 35 stitches—cast on 26, knit 35.
Knit for 22 inches, knit 2, purl 2 for 3 inches.
Crochet sides together, leaving 9 inches for arm hole.
Crochet edge ½ inch deep round around neck.

(Garden Island, 12/4/1917, p. 4)

Red Cross Knitting

The Garden Island, Volume 13, Number 49, Page 4. December 4, 1917.

Another Hawaiian goes to war abroad, 1917.

[Found under: “Nuhou Kuloko”]

Moses Puahi Keoua, the engineer for the prison, received a letter from his son, Peter Moses Keoua, who left Hawaii nei about two months ago, which told of his enlisting into the British military in Canada; he is staying at the military base in Winnipeg until the government calls those troops to the battlefield.

(Aloha Aina, 11/2/1917, p. 4)

Ua loaa mai he leka...

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXII, Helu 44, Aoao 4. Novemaba 2, 1917.