A mele by the “Solomon” of Hawaii, William J. Sheldon, 1918.

A MELE FOR THE HAWAIIAN BOYS.

Here again is this mele which was composed for the Hawaiian boys who just left Hawaii for America to join the armed forces of the nation, to try all means to obtain peace in the future, and the composer recalls the famous words of the Conqueror of the Nation of Hawaii nei, “Law of the Splintered Paddle: let the old men and the old women go and lie by the roads, no one is to disturb them.”

These lines of mele were composed in English by our friend and famous composer of songs of these days, and in other words, the “Solomon,” Hon. William J. Sheldon (Kelekona). The music will be available soon as it is now being edited with great care.

I.

Farewell, farewell dear Hawaii,
Sweet land of song and aloha
Thy sons to duty’s call go forth,
To the front thy honor to bear.

Chorus:

Boys, when you get over there,
Don’t forget Hawaii aloha
For you, we will ever pray
That freedom and liberty be won.

II.

Thou are brave sons of Hawaii,
True to your country’s call,
Let Hawaii’s fame be known,
O Hawaii no ka oi.

(Aloha Aina, 6/21/1918, p. 2)

HE MELE NO NA KEIKI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXIII, Helu 25, Aoao 2. Iune 21, 1918.

Advertisements

Vote for William J. Sheldon, 1914.

ANNOUNCEMENT

To the Voters of the City and County of Honolulu.

Gentlemen: I hereby announce that I will be a candidate at the coming primary election for the Republican nomination for Sheriff. Having had the police experience of serving as deputy sheriff of several districts of these islands, and the legislative experience of five successive terms, besides being a practicing attorney, I am confident that, if elected, I shall be able to conduct the office of Sheriff with both intelligence and efficiency.

Your obedient servant,

WILLIAM J. SHELDON.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 8/16/1914, p. 4)

ANNOUCEMENT

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXII, Number 6973, Page 4. August 16, 1914.

And more on the passing of John G. M. Sheldon, 1914.

JOHN KAHIKINA KELEKONA HAS PASSED.

At nine o’clock in the morning of this past Friday, the life breath of John Kahikina Kelekona left forever at his home; he was a very famous historian, and an old newspaperman in this town in years past, and his famous works will become an unforgettable monument to him.

He left behind many children, six daughters and two sons. The girls are: Mrs. I. Cockett; Mrs. J. R. Francis; Mrs. Ernest Kaai; Mrs. Joseph Namea; Mrs. M. Dutro, of Wailuku, Maui; Miss Emma Sheldon; and the boys are: D. K. Sheldon and Henry Sheldon, who work as clerks on inter-island steamships.

He left also two brothers [hoahanau]: William J. Sheldon, one of the esteemed members of the legislature some sessions ago, and Lawrence K. Sheldon who is with the law enforcement office in Honolulu. Continue reading

John G. M. Sheldon passes away, 1914.

SUDDEN DEATH OF J. G. M. SHELDON

John G. M. Sheldon, brother of Henry Sheldon, of Lihue, and Wm. J. Sheldon, formerly of Waimea, died in Honolulu of hemorrhage last Friday morning. He had been in rather poor health for several years. Henry Sheldon left by the Kinau Saturday for Honolulu to attend the funeral, which took place Sunday afternoon.

Mr. Sheldon was one of the oldest printers in the Islands, having begun work as such when quite young. Being proficient in both the English and Hawaiian languages, he was frequently employed as interpreter in the courts and elsewhere. He had many friends by whom he was well liked.

(Garden Island, 3/31/1914, p. 1)

SUDDEN DEATH OF J. G. M. SHELDON

The Garden Island, Volume 10, Number 12, Page 1. March 31, 1914.

More on translations, 1909.

TRANSLATIONS OF BILLS ARE NOT CORRECT

Altercations arose between members of the House of Representatives over the incorrect translations of bills which were placed in the hands of the Publication Committee [Komite Pa’i], and the two from whom the incorrectly translated bills originated were upset at the inattentiveness of the Publication Committee in their work.

This anger of some of the members originated with the Public Lands Committee [Komite o na Aina Aupuni], because some of the members noticed the incorrect translation of their bills.

For the bill of Coney, it is said that the translation in Hawaiian is not at all like the idea of the bill in English, and at the meeting of the Committee on Public Lands on this past Friday, they could not consider that bill until they consult with the Publication Committee.

Representative Sheldon was one who made known the incorrect translation of his bills, and being that there are many bill translators with whom the bills were left with for translations, there will be no shortage of those types of divergent translations.

(Kuokoa, 3/5/1909, p. 1)

POLOLEI OLE KA UNUHIIA ANA O NA BILA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 5, 1909.

A composition for Hawaiians boys going away to war, 1918

Mele for the Hawaiian Boys

Seen below is a mele composed by the Honorable W. J. Sheldon for the fifty Hawaiian boys who gave themselves to join the war on the side of the nation of America. It is a song put before the Royal Hawaiian Band, to be played before the public.

It is believed that if these Hawaiian boys head out to the training camp in America on Tuesday, this song would have been sung for them in their honor. But as their trip is postponed until the arrival of a military ship, therefore the boys have been set back until next month. It is still believed that this will be one of the songs that will be sung to honor them. Here is this mele to glorify these Hawaiian youths:

WIKIWIKI OVER THE TOP

He kama oiwi Hawaii oe,
He aa,  he koa wiwoole;
Imua no ka pono oi ae,
A inu i ka wai awaawa.

Hui.

Ku kilakila Hawaii,
Iwaena o ka Pakipika,
O Hawaii no ka oi,
Wikiwiki over the top.

Hawaii no oe a ka imiloa,
Loa ka imina lanakila,
Hanohano oe e Hawaii,
I na oiwi o ka aina.

O ke Akua pu me oukou,
E na kama oiwi Hawaii,
Uumi ka hanu a lanakila,
A lei i ka hanohano.

Hakuia e Wm. J. Sheldon.

[Which went something like this:

QUICKLY OVER THE TOP.

You are a native son,
Daring, a fearless warrior;
Forward for the greater good,
And drink of the bitter waters.

Chorus.

Hawaii stands tall,
Amidst the Pacific,
Hawaii is the foremost,
Quickly, over the top.

You are Hawaii, of explorers,
Far reaching is your search for victory,
Proud is Hawaii,
For the oiwi of the land.

God be with you,
O Native sons of Hawaii,
Be patient until victorious,
And wear the honor like a lei.

Composed by William J. Sheldon.]

(Kuokoa, 5/17/1918, p. 3)

HE MELE NO NA KEIKI HAWAII

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVI, Helu 20, Aoao 3. Mei 17, 1918.

On the perpetuation of the Hawaiian Language, 1911.

THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Before the Legislature is a bill put forth by the Honorable W. J. Sheldon of Waimea, Kauai, which seeks to perpetuate the mother tongue of this land; but the committee announced that the bill will be tabled; to which the father of the bill asked that they wait for a bit until the following Saturday, April 1.

The intent of the bill is to allow for time in some schools to teach the Hawaiian language. “Here are the Japanese,” said the Honorable One, “they are caring for their mother tongue, and so too of the Chinese; but we, the native children of this land, our native language is disappearing from our own land. It is imperative that we try to perpetuate our beautiful language even just a little longer. I feel remorse in letting the beautiful language of our ancestors go. The government pays for travelling instructors to teach singing and lace making [hana lihilihi ?] in public schools, so why not choose people like that to go and teach for one hour every school day? It will not be a great expense like what is imagined by the committee.”

We believe that these are very wise responses by the Honorable One of Waimea, and if indeed means are not sought to perpetuate the beloved language of our birth land, then it will not be long before the Hawaiian language will disappear completely.

The Hoku gives its mahalo to the Honorable One of the Waiula Iliahi¹ of Waimea for his consideration and aloha for the beautiful language of the Paradise of the Pacific Ocean.

¹Waiula Iliahi is one of the two branches of the Waimea River, and the other being Waikea, and they merge at Kikiaola.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/30/1911, p. 2)

KA OLELO HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 5, Helu 47, Aoao 2. Maraki 30, 1911.