On the perpetuation of the Hawaiian Language, 1911.

THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE

Before the Legislature is a bill put forth by the Honorable W. J. Sheldon of Waimea, Kauai, which seeks to perpetuate the mother tongue of this land; but the committee announced that the bill will be tabled; to which the father of the bill asked that they wait for a bit until the following Saturday, April 1.

The intent of the bill is to allow for time in some schools to teach the Hawaiian language. “Here are the Japanese,” said the Honorable One, “they are caring for their mother tongue, and so too of the Chinese; but we, the native children of this land, our native language is disappearing from our own land. It is imperative that we try to perpetuate our beautiful language even just a little longer. I feel remorse in letting the beautiful language of our ancestors go. The government pays for travelling instructors to teach singing and lace making [hana lihilihi ?] in public schools, so why not choose people like that to go and teach for one hour every school day? It will not be a great expense like what is imagined by the committee.”

We believe that these are very wise responses by the Honorable One of Waimea, and if indeed means are not sought to perpetuate the beloved language of our birth land, then it will not be long before the Hawaiian language will disappear completely.

The Hoku gives its mahalo to the Honorable One of the Waiula Iliahi¹ of Waimea for his consideration and aloha for the beautiful language of the Paradise of the Pacific Ocean.

¹Waiula Iliahi is one of the two branches of the Waimea River, and the other being Waikea, and they merge at Kikiaola.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/30/1911, p. 2)

KA OLELO HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 5, Helu 47, Aoao 2. Maraki 30, 1911.

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