Meeting with Maori residents of Hawaii, 1920.

AUDIENCE WITH THE MAORI AT THE HOME OF MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

In the uplands of Manoa, at the home of Mrs. A. P. (Ahuena) Taylor, at “Luana Pua,” an audience was held to honor the Maori of New Zealand [Nu Kilani], living in this town; and attending were many Hawaiians, where they spent a long time, last night, meeting with the malihini, while they compared the old Hawaiian stories with that of the Maori people.

This is the second time which the Maoris appeared at the home of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, on that night, because of the desire of these malihini to have proper time for them to meet and discuss with the descendents of the important families of Hawaii nei.

Present were the descendents of the line of Kamehameha and Kalakaua on that night, there also were some kamaaina who had a deep understanding of the history of the Hawaiian people, to satisfy the desire of the malihini.

Within Mrs. A. P. Taylor, as well as in all of the people who gathered there last night, was the wish to find the genealogy shared between the Hawaiians and the Maori people, and that it be in accordance with the stories memorized by the Maori; and it is their true belief that the Maori came from the Hawaiians by Hawaiians travelling to New Zealand.

This night was spent with talking between the malihini and kamaaina, as the crowd was entertained by singing, while light foods were passed before all who were invited.

Amongst those present at this meeting was: Princess Kawananakoa, Kaukaualii Stella Keomailani Kea, Kaukaualii Kekaaniau Pratt, Judge S. B. Dole, Mrs. Mary Jane Montano, Edwin Kea, Kaukaualii Lucy K. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. E. Henriques, Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, Mrs. Irene Holloway, Mrs. K. Hutchinson, Misses Lani Mercy and Misses Lani Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. K. Beckley, L. Beckley, G. H. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Kahea, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Taylor, Miss Mabel Taylor, Mrs. E. Straus, Mrs. K. Kali, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Lane, Mr. and Mrs. C. Maertens, Miss Anna Maertens, Mrs. E. M. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Burns, Mr. and Mrs. H. Afong, Mrs. J. M. Riggs, Col. and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea, Mr. and Mrs. M. Ahia, Mrs. N. Mahelona, Misses Mahelona, Mrs. M. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Hoapili, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Hoapili, Miss Hoapili, A. Hoapili, K. Hoapili, G. Kealohapauole, Mrs. K. Mahoe, Mr. and Mrs. Hans Gittel, Mr. and Mrs. W. Simerson, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Harbottle, Rev. and Mrs. S. Kamaiopili, Mr. and Mrs. E. Boyd, Mrs. K. Wallace, Judge and Mrs. A. G. M. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Chillingworth, Mr. and Mrs. S. Chillingworth, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Hons, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb, Mrs. E. S. Cunha, Miss Irene Dickson, W. A. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kamanoulu, Mrs. J. H. Wilson, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Mrs. Niau Iaukea, Mrs. S. Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Hind, Miss HInd, Miss Mary Low, Mr. and Mrs. Eben Low, Mrs. Hannah Paris, Mrs. Caroline Robinson, Miss Kathleen Ward, Miss Lucy Ward, Miss Kulamanu Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Hanohano, Mrs. K. Bishaw, Mr. and Mrs. C. Long, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Mana, Mrs. Myra Iona, Mr and Mrs. E. W. Burgess, Mrs. P. Phillips, Mrs. M. Fernandez, Mrs. Edwin Fernandez, Rev. and Mrs. Maikai, Mr. and Mrs. M. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Irwin, Mr. and Mrs. D. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cottrell, Mrs. Hilda Techera, Mrs. Kamaka Stillman, Mr. and Mrs. Cushingham, Mrs. Ellen Dwight, Misses Holt, Mrs. C. W. Spitz, Mrs. T. B. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Constable, Captain and Mrs. W. E. Miles, Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, Mr. and Mrs. W. Paikuli, H. L. Holstein, Carl Widemann.

[To have been a fly on the wall here…!]

(Kuokoa, 6/18/1920, p. 4)

KA AHA IKE A NA MAORI MA KA HOME O MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 24, Aoao 4. Iune 18, 1920.

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More Ernest Kaai—meeting a Hawaiian living in Australia, 1925.

That Hawaiian Wants to Come Back Here

Ernest Kaai Finds L. G. Kaainoa in Australia, and He Tells of His Desire to See Once Again His Land

This is a picture of L. G. Kaainoa and Ernest Kaai. Mr. Kaai found Kaainoa in Australia, and he wants the help from Hawaiians to provide him a means for him to once again tread upon the land of his birth. From the left, L. G. Kaainoa, Ernest Kaai.

L. G. Kaainoa has been away from Hawaii for 50 years now without his family’s knowledge, or knowing even if he has ohana left alive here; Ernest Kaai sent a letter to the Ahahui Mamakakaua [Sons and Daughters of Hawaiian Warriors] telling them of the desire of Kaainoa (who now lives in New South Wales, Australia), to return to his homeland were he to receive assistance from Hawaii’s people to pay his expenses for the return.

According to the explanation in the letter of Ernest Kaai, L. G. Kaainoa is now 72 years old, and being that he is very old, the government provides him a pension of 4 dollars a week.

Ernest Kaai says he found Kaainoa at a place called Murwillumbah. He left Hawaii nei in his youth and it is there that he lived until his old age.

He married a woman, but she died 12 years earlier. He is infirm and cannot do hard labor. But he is given benefits by the government of 4 dollars every week.

Kaainoa is well liked by the people there, and when he met with Ernest Kaai, he made clear his hope to return to his homeland, if not for any other reason, but for his desire to leave his bones in Hawaii nei.

He is still very good at Hawaiian, yet is somewhat clumsy, but he is most fluent in English.

According to Kaai in his letter, he was staying along with his fellow musicians at a place called Tweed Heads, where they were waiting for the arrival of a ship to take them to Murbah. When the ship arrived, and after they loaded their belongings aboard, it was then they saw Mr. Kaainoa. He came all the way to meet with Kaai folk, and to welcome him to his town where he has lived for 50 years.

At their meeting, Kaainoa gave his hand, saying, “Aloha, aloha, aloha!” His heart was full while he expressed his great aloha as his tears flowed, while some others joined in with him.

After those feelings of aloha calmed within him, and his crying stopped, it was then that he began to speak, asking about some people in Hawaii nei. And as Kaai did not know them, he told him so. All he could think of that Kaainoa could ask of was the alii of Hawaii nei.

Kaai and his musical group spent two nights at Murbah, and on those two nights, they saw Kaainoa sitting way up front of the theater house. And when the singing was over, he continued to stomp on the floor as if he was so proud of this singing of his very own people.

The main reason Mr. Kaai wrote to the Ahahui Mamakakaua by way of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, the president of the Association, was to look for assistance; if she could ask the other Hawaiian associations to join in on this charitable endeavor to bring Kaainoa back to Hawaii nei for him to leave his bones in the soil of his homeland.

To follow through on this plea, Mrs. Taylor met with the president of the Hawaiian Civic Club [Kalapu Hoeueu Hawaii], and the secretary of the Kaahumanu Society; and in the upcoming days, the other Hawaiian organizations will learn about this assistance of their fellow Hawaiian.

(Kuokoa 3/5/1925, p. 1)

Makemake ia Hawaii e Hoi mai no ka Aina Nei

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIV, Helu 10, Aoao 1. Maraki 5, 1925.

Kamehameha III’s Feather Cape returned to Hawaii, 1927.

THE FEATHER-CAPE OF KAMEHAMEHA IS RETURNED

Ceremony in Respect to the Ahuula is Carried Out in the Crown Room of the Palace Last Monday

In the morning of last Monday, the throne room of the palace was filled with visitors to see the ahuula of Kamehameha III gifted to Commodore James Lawrence Kernny, and now becoming a treasure for Hawaii nei, through the generosity of Walter Dillingham, the one who purchased the ahuula.

The ahuula arrived aboard the steamer Malolo which arrived in town, and was entrusted to the safekeeping of the national archives, and on that Monday was returned to the throne room with ceremony befitting the ahuula, along with the singing of patriotic songs of Hawaii nei, as well as the hearing by the crowd of speeches given by A. P. Taylor of the national arvhives, Governor W. R. Farrington, and Walter Dillingham.

The ahuula was returned and draped upon the throne, and to the right was the Princess Kalanianaole, while the throne room was filled with members of the Mamakakaua Association and heads of businesses and the multitudes there in that room.

The Story of the Ahuula

After hearing some songs for Kamehameha III, composed by some Hawaiian ladies, the crowd entered while singing the anthem of Hawaii. And Mr. A. P. Taylor explained the history of the ahuula.

According to him, this was an ahuula gifted to Commodore James Lawrence Kearny of the warship Constellation, by Kamehameha III, in the year 1843. He was the one who saved Hawaii from the subjugation by George Paulet.

The ahuula was inherited by the child of Commodore Kearny, and from there to his cousin, James Lawrence Boggs of New Jersey.

After the explanation of its story, the ahuula was presented before the governor for the makaainana of Hawaii nei, whereupon the governor spoke a bit, while giving his thanks and appreciation for it being returned here to be cared for in Hawaii nei.

Given to the Museum

The honor was given to Walter Dillingham for his return of the ahuula for stewardship by the museum up above Kamehameha, and he gave a short speech and placed the ahuula under the care of A. F. Judd, one of the members of the board of the Trust of Pauahi Bishop. After his speech, Mrs. Mary Kekinookalani Padeken presented a chant composed by her, “Aalii Ku Makani.”

[If this sounds familiar, I am reposting it from the old Facebook site. Posts on FB are not easily searched, and so periodically I am thinking of doing reposts of those articles…]

(Kuokoa, 12/1/1927, p. 1)

HOIHOI HOU IA MAI NEI KA AHUULA O KAMEHAMEHA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 53, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 1, 1927.

Opposition to Hula in West Coast of the U. S., 1916.

Opposition to Hawaiian Hula in the West.

A. P. Taylor, the Secretary of the Promotion Committee of Hawaii, received a letter from J. Walter Scott, the representative of the Promotion Committee on the West Coast of America, speaking of their preparations to oppose Hawaiian Hula.

Here is what was said in the letter: “The kind of hula that we are witnessing here, it is not according to what is wanted, and is something that has become abhorred. This is what I think: For the honor of the Islands of Paradise, and for its good name, we rise as one to obliterate for good that act from amongst us.

We will begin this opposition immediately, and I trust it will move forward in no time.

(Puuhonua, 9/1/1916, p. 5)

Kueia ka Hula Hawaii ma ke Komohana.

Ka Puuhonua, Buke III, Helu 33, Aoao 5. Sepatemaba 1, 1916.