Books to teach Maori English arrive, 1878.

Maori Books.

We return our hearty thanks to a Brother Editor of the New Zealand Press for some nice Maori books forwarded by last mail. They are destined for the instruction of the Maoris in the English language. The Maori title of one of these books is:—He Akoranga i te reo Ingarihi mo te kura Maori, or, “Lessons in the English Language for Maori Schools.” Published at Wellington “by authority” by George Didsbury, Government Printer. Continue reading

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Meeting with Maori residents of Hawaii, 1920.

AUDIENCE WITH THE MAORI AT THE HOME OF MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

In the uplands of Manoa, at the home of Mrs. A. P. (Ahuena) Taylor, at “Luana Pua,” an audience was held to honor the Maori of New Zealand [Nu Kilani], living in this town; and attending were many Hawaiians, where they spent a long time, last night, meeting with the malihini, while they compared the old Hawaiian stories with that of the Maori people.

This is the second time which the Maoris appeared at the home of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, on that night, because of the desire of these malihini to have proper time for them to meet and discuss with the descendents of the important families of Hawaii nei.

Present were the descendents of the line of Kamehameha and Kalakaua on that night, there also were some kamaaina who had a deep understanding of the history of the Hawaiian people, to satisfy the desire of the malihini.

Within Mrs. A. P. Taylor, as well as in all of the people who gathered there last night, was the wish to find the genealogy shared between the Hawaiians and the Maori people, and that it be in accordance with the stories memorized by the Maori; and it is their true belief that the Maori came from the Hawaiians by Hawaiians travelling to New Zealand.

This night was spent with talking between the malihini and kamaaina, as the crowd was entertained by singing, while light foods were passed before all who were invited.

Amongst those present at this meeting was: Princess Kawananakoa, Kaukaualii Stella Keomailani Kea, Kaukaualii Kekaaniau Pratt, Judge S. B. Dole, Mrs. Mary Jane Montano, Edwin Kea, Kaukaualii Lucy K. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. E. Henriques, Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, Mrs. Irene Holloway, Mrs. K. Hutchinson, Misses Lani Mercy and Misses Lani Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. K. Beckley, L. Beckley, G. H. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Kahea, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Taylor, Miss Mabel Taylor, Mrs. E. Straus, Mrs. K. Kali, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Lane, Mr. and Mrs. C. Maertens, Miss Anna Maertens, Mrs. E. M. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Burns, Mr. and Mrs. H. Afong, Mrs. J. M. Riggs, Col. and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea, Mr. and Mrs. M. Ahia, Mrs. N. Mahelona, Misses Mahelona, Mrs. M. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Hoapili, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Hoapili, Miss Hoapili, A. Hoapili, K. Hoapili, G. Kealohapauole, Mrs. K. Mahoe, Mr. and Mrs. Hans Gittel, Mr. and Mrs. W. Simerson, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Harbottle, Rev. and Mrs. S. Kamaiopili, Mr. and Mrs. E. Boyd, Mrs. K. Wallace, Judge and Mrs. A. G. M. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Chillingworth, Mr. and Mrs. S. Chillingworth, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Hons, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb, Mrs. E. S. Cunha, Miss Irene Dickson, W. A. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kamanoulu, Mrs. J. H. Wilson, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Mrs. Niau Iaukea, Mrs. S. Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Hind, Miss HInd, Miss Mary Low, Mr. and Mrs. Eben Low, Mrs. Hannah Paris, Mrs. Caroline Robinson, Miss Kathleen Ward, Miss Lucy Ward, Miss Kulamanu Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Hanohano, Mrs. K. Bishaw, Mr. and Mrs. C. Long, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Mana, Mrs. Myra Iona, Mr and Mrs. E. W. Burgess, Mrs. P. Phillips, Mrs. M. Fernandez, Mrs. Edwin Fernandez, Rev. and Mrs. Maikai, Mr. and Mrs. M. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Irwin, Mr. and Mrs. D. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cottrell, Mrs. Hilda Techera, Mrs. Kamaka Stillman, Mr. and Mrs. Cushingham, Mrs. Ellen Dwight, Misses Holt, Mrs. C. W. Spitz, Mrs. T. B. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Constable, Captain and Mrs. W. E. Miles, Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, Mr. and Mrs. W. Paikuli, H. L. Holstein, Carl Widemann.

[To have been a fly on the wall here…!]

(Kuokoa, 6/18/1920, p. 4)

KA AHA IKE A NA MAORI MA KA HOME O MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 24, Aoao 4. Iune 18, 1920.

Ara, the Maori Wizard, 1912.

ARA, THE MAORI WIZARD

[Here is an image of Ara, mentioned in the previous post. See the rest of the article here: A Trip Around the World.

Also see more English-language coverage in Chronicling America!]

(Hawaiian Star, 2/10/1912, p. 12)

ARA, THE MAORI WIZARD

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XIX, Number 6198, Page 12. February 10, 1912.

Maori in Hawaii, 1912.

A New Zealand Theater Group.

A New Zealand theater troupe under the leadership of Ara, a man from the Maori people who performs astonishing acts, arrived in Honolulu. After they left their own land, they visited the lands of the South: New Guinea, Fiji, Samoa, the Solomon Islands, and then arrived here. They are taking beautiful shots of Hawaii nei, and when they perform, they have some nice scenes of these islands.

They will also show some pictures of New Zealand, the lifestyle of the Maori, the Hot Volcanic Springs, Palorous Jack [Pelorus Jack], that astonishing piloting fish that guides the way before sailboats when they enter into the harbor of Wellington, and for which a law was made protecting its life, as well as some other lovely pictures of New Zealand. One day in March, they will hold their performance at the Hale Mele Hou [Opera House].

(Aloha Aina, 2/17/1912, p. 1)

HE PUALI KEAKA NU KILANI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 7, Aoao 1. Feberuari 17, 1912.

Hawaiian Dictionary, 1913.

Hawaiian Word Dictionary

A great number of experts makes a Book a highly valuable Book, divided into many categories, each of which is given to a certain leader to think over, should it be intended to become a useful book; however, if it is composed by just one or two, the explanations will be limited and not complete.

When the English Dictionary, known as the “Standard Dictionary,” was published, it is said that the number of people who produced it is 500 or more, and that is one of the most complete dictionaries of the English language known these days. Within it, there are some Hawaiian words found within the language of the Maoris. And so too with the Hawaiian language, the producing of a Dictionary which clearly defines each word, is now being considered.

We have been told that our Queen Liliuokalani has been asked to help in this great endeavor, and she agreed. It is true, our Queen is very adept at English and understands that language, as well as her own mother tongue, and it is rare to find a person like her amongst the Hawaiians; therefore, it is proper that she agreed to give her assistance to this big project which will become an unforgettable monument for her people and for all people in the future.

(Holomua, 10/4/1913, p. 4)

Ka Buke Wehewehe Huaolelo Hawaii

Holomua, Buke I, Helu 1, Aoao 4. Okatoba 4, 1913