Maori in Hawaii, 1899.

Speech of the New Zealander.

Wheraliko Rawei, a man from New Zealand [Nu Kilani], gave [a speech] in the YMCA building [Hale o ka Hui Opio] of Honolulu nei. The topic of his presentation pertained to New Zealand, the land of the Maori people.

He is a native New Zealander, and is fluent in English. He was well educated in that language in schools of the land of his birth.

His presentation was enhanced with lime light pictures [kii hoolele aka]; these pictures were of the very famous places of his homeland. His speech was made very delightful with songs of New Zealand.

There were many people of this town who showed up to listen to his speech. All of the seats were filled by the spectators, and some people stood. He gave another presentation on this past Thursday.

(Kuokoa, 9/29/1899, p. 1)

Haiolelo a ka Nu Kilani.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXVIII, Helu 39, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 29, 1899.

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A New Year’s Gift: a Genealogy of Rulers, 1874.

A NEW YEAR’S GIFT.

The Kuokoa, on this first issue of its proud days of 1874, wants to gift this Genealogical List of the Rulers over the Hawaian people, starting from Kahiko Luamea, from the pen of S. M. Kamakau. It was upon Oahu that the ancient ones first lived, and the genealogy from before this is not from here in Hawaii, but it is said that they were from the sky [lewa]. The first people in this genealogy, it is widely stated that they are from the Islands of the South Pacific, New Zealand, and the islands to the Western North Pacific. And the listing of Alii Genealogy below just pertains to those who were Aliiaimoku. From Kahiko Luamea to Kapawa, they just ruled on Oahu. From Kapawa to Palena, most of the Alii were on Oahu and Maui; one was from Kauai, Luanuu; and two on Hawaii, Wahieloa and Pohukaina; and from Palena is where Hawaii’s royal Ancestry from Maui come from. And from Palena was born Hana, thereafter Maui’s and Hawaii’s chiefly line have been born until this time. It began from Abraham, being that the laws were the same, the genealogy was the same, and the circumcision was the same. Here are the alii listed out:

Kahiko Luamea,
Awakea [Wakea],
Haloa,
Waia,
Hinanalo,
Nanakahili,
Wailoa,
Kio,
Ole,
Pupue,
Manaku,
Lukahakoa,
Kahiko,
Luanuu,
Kii,
Ulu,
Nana,
Nanaia,
Nanaialani,
Waikulani,
Kuheleimoana,
Konohiki,
Wawana,
Akalana,
Mauiakalana,
Nanamaoa,
Nanakulai,
Nanakaoko,
Kapawa,
Heleipawa,
Hulumanailani,
Aikanaka,
Hema,
Kahai,
Wahieloa,
Laka,
Luanuu,
Kamea,
Pohukaina,
Hua,
Pau,
Paumakua,
Huanuiikalailai,
Haho,
Palena,
Hana,
Lanakawai,
Laau,
Pili,
Koa,
Loe,
Kukahoulani,
Kaniuhu,
(Kanipahu Kalapana)
Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou,
Kalaunuiohua,
Kuaiwa,
Kahoukapu,
Kauhola,
Kiha,
Liloa,
Hakau,
Umi,
Keliiokala,
Keawenuiaumi,
Kanaloakuaana,
Umiokalani,
Lonoikamakahiki,
Iwikauikaua,
Keakakamahana (w [wahine])
Keakealani (w),
Keaweikekahialiiokamoku,
(Kalaninuiiamamao Keeaumoku),
Alapai a Kauaua,
Keaweopala,
Kaleiopuu,
Kiwalao,
Kamehameha I.
Liholiho (Kamehameha II),
Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III),
Liholiho II (Kamehameha IV),
Kapuaiwa (Kamehameha V),
Lunalilo.

[This seems to be a little different from what is seen in the appendix of Kamakau’s “Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii”.]

(Kuokoa, 1/3/1874, p. 2)

HE MAKANA MAKAHIKI HOU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 1, Aoao 2. Ianuari 3, 1874.

And more on the Maori, 1920.

Comparison of New Zealand and Hawaii, the Hawaiian People and the Maori.

In the English morning newspaper [Pacific Commercial Advertiser] of the 17th of June, that mouthpiece published a clarification between the island of New Zealand and Hawaii, the population of the Maori lahui living today and that of the Hawaiian lahui.

That English paper said the area of New Zealand is 160,000 square miles, and that there are 50,00 Maori living today. As for Hawaii, it is 6,500 square miles, and there are 20,000 of its lahui living currently; and these two people are very much alike in language and genealogy.

However, the Maori have 500,000 heads of sheep, 60,000 heads of cattle, and 50,000 heads of horses. In Hawaii nei, the job of raising livestock is left to the other ethnicities, and the Hawaiians themselves, they raise a few chickens and a couple or three pigs.

In comparing these islands, New Zealand is fifteen times as big as Hawaii nei, but the total Hawaiians are more than the Maori per square miles; the comparisons put forth by the English paper are correct, all but what was said about our few chickens and pigs.

That comparison criticizes  and ridicules the Hawaiian people. But the one who wrote these comparisons pertaining to the chickens and pigs is not far from these things of which he mocks the Hawaiian people about, for his wife is a Hawaiian, and he is a Kolea bird¹ from America.

¹The kolea is the migrating plover, that is used to symbolize people who come to Hawaii, and like these birds, feed off of the riches only to leave after getting fat.

[I will have to check on who the writer was. Too bad the Advertiser is not online!]

(Aloha Aina, 7/4/1920, p. 4)

Na Hoohalike ana ia New Zealand me Hawaii, ka lahui Hawaii a me ka Maori

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XXXX, Helu 43, Aoao 4. July 3, 1920.

More on Maori visit, 1920.

[Found under: “On The Other Islands”]

Returns Green Stone—Because the visiting Maoris from New Zealand declined to be initiated on Sunday into the Hale o na Alii, Princess Kawananakoa returned to the Maoris the beautiful green New Zealand stone which they had presented her at her reception in their honor.

(Maui News, 7/2/1920, p. 6)

Returns Green Stone

The Maui News. 21st Year, Number 1059, Page 6. July 2, 1920.

Maori visit Hawaii, 1920.

This is Mr. J. K. Mokumaia with the Maori malihini, photographed before the statue of Kamehameha; they are Mr. and Mrs. Clark of New Zealand. The woman is the last kaukau alii [kaukaualii hope loa ??], and they came to do good works by strengthening the missionaries of the Latter Day.

[The text is pretty clear, but during the last decades of the newspapers, you will notice more and more typos, as you can see here.

If the newspapers were reshot clearly, the image would no doubt be much more crisp.]

(Kuokoa, 7/9/1920, p. 3)

Mr. J. K. Mokumaia keia...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 3. Iulai 9, 1920.

Meeting with Maori residents of Hawaii, 1920.

AUDIENCE WITH THE MAORI AT THE HOME OF MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

In the uplands of Manoa, at the home of Mrs. A. P. (Ahuena) Taylor, at “Luana Pua,” an audience was held to honor the Maori of New Zealand [Nu Kilani], living in this town; and attending were many Hawaiians, where they spent a long time, last night, meeting with the malihini, while they compared the old Hawaiian stories with that of the Maori people.

This is the second time which the Maoris appeared at the home of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, on that night, because of the desire of these malihini to have proper time for them to meet and discuss with the descendents of the important families of Hawaii nei.

Present were the descendents of the line of Kamehameha and Kalakaua on that night, there also were some kamaaina who had a deep understanding of the history of the Hawaiian people, to satisfy the desire of the malihini.

Within Mrs. A. P. Taylor, as well as in all of the people who gathered there last night, was the wish to find the genealogy shared between the Hawaiians and the Maori people, and that it be in accordance with the stories memorized by the Maori; and it is their true belief that the Maori came from the Hawaiians by Hawaiians travelling to New Zealand.

This night was spent with talking between the malihini and kamaaina, as the crowd was entertained by singing, while light foods were passed before all who were invited.

Amongst those present at this meeting was: Princess Kawananakoa, Kaukaualii Stella Keomailani Kea, Kaukaualii Kekaaniau Pratt, Judge S. B. Dole, Mrs. Mary Jane Montano, Edwin Kea, Kaukaualii Lucy K. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. E. Henriques, Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, Mrs. Irene Holloway, Mrs. K. Hutchinson, Misses Lani Mercy and Misses Lani Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. K. Beckley, L. Beckley, G. H. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Kahea, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Taylor, Miss Mabel Taylor, Mrs. E. Straus, Mrs. K. Kali, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Lane, Mr. and Mrs. C. Maertens, Miss Anna Maertens, Mrs. E. M. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Burns, Mr. and Mrs. H. Afong, Mrs. J. M. Riggs, Col. and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea, Mr. and Mrs. M. Ahia, Mrs. N. Mahelona, Misses Mahelona, Mrs. M. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Hoapili, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Hoapili, Miss Hoapili, A. Hoapili, K. Hoapili, G. Kealohapauole, Mrs. K. Mahoe, Mr. and Mrs. Hans Gittel, Mr. and Mrs. W. Simerson, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Harbottle, Rev. and Mrs. S. Kamaiopili, Mr. and Mrs. E. Boyd, Mrs. K. Wallace, Judge and Mrs. A. G. M. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Chillingworth, Mr. and Mrs. S. Chillingworth, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Hons, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb, Mrs. E. S. Cunha, Miss Irene Dickson, W. A. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kamanoulu, Mrs. J. H. Wilson, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Mrs. Niau Iaukea, Mrs. S. Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Hind, Miss HInd, Miss Mary Low, Mr. and Mrs. Eben Low, Mrs. Hannah Paris, Mrs. Caroline Robinson, Miss Kathleen Ward, Miss Lucy Ward, Miss Kulamanu Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Hanohano, Mrs. K. Bishaw, Mr. and Mrs. C. Long, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Mana, Mrs. Myra Iona, Mr and Mrs. E. W. Burgess, Mrs. P. Phillips, Mrs. M. Fernandez, Mrs. Edwin Fernandez, Rev. and Mrs. Maikai, Mr. and Mrs. M. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Irwin, Mr. and Mrs. D. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cottrell, Mrs. Hilda Techera, Mrs. Kamaka Stillman, Mr. and Mrs. Cushingham, Mrs. Ellen Dwight, Misses Holt, Mrs. C. W. Spitz, Mrs. T. B. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Constable, Captain and Mrs. W. E. Miles, Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, Mr. and Mrs. W. Paikuli, H. L. Holstein, Carl Widemann.

[To have been a fly on the wall here…!]

(Kuokoa, 6/18/1920, p. 4)

KA AHA IKE A NA MAORI MA KA HOME O MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 24, Aoao 4. Iune 18, 1920.

Ara, the Maori Wizard, 1912.

ARA, THE MAORI WIZARD

[Here is an image of Ara, mentioned in the previous post. See the rest of the article here: A Trip Around the World.

Also see more English-language coverage in Chronicling America!]

(Hawaiian Star, 2/10/1912, p. 12)

ARA, THE MAORI WIZARD

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XIX, Number 6198, Page 12. February 10, 1912.