Helen H. Roberts, ethnomusicologist, collecting mele from across the islands, 1923.

SOMETHING WORTHWHILE HELPING

In this past Legislative session, $5,000 was set aside for the cost to prepare a book of “Ancient Hawaiian Music”. This endeavor has been given to Kamehameha School, and they are now utilizing this to preserve the “old mele olioli” of Hawaii nei. Miss Helen H. Roberts has been sent by the Trustees of the Kamehameha School to go amongst the Hawaiians and to search out ancient mele of Hawaii nei.

She is accompanied by a phonograph [ponotalapa (ipu malama olelo)], and is looking to have people chant ancient mele into the phonograph and to record and save it for generations to come. Not only mele olioli are being sought after, but also wanted are mele hula hoaeae of the Hawaiians. Many years from now the people who know these old mele will be gone, but these mele olioli and mele hoaeae will become something to look back to the history of the Hawaiian Lahui.

This will be something that will look for where the Hawaiians came from, whereas also being sought are mele of other Polynesians while comparing these ancient mele with the ancient mele of Hawaii.

This is something that the old people who are fluent for instance in the old mele hoaeae of Hawaii nei should assist in.

This is not being done for monetary profit, but to seek the ancient things of the beloved Kupuna of this Lahui; and for all Hawaiians who have pride in the fame of their Lahui, there is no reason for them to withhold these ancient things of the Kupuna and to go to the grave without leaving these blessings for those coming after them. We ask Rev. W. M. Kalaiwaa and Rev. William Kamau of the Kohala districts to support this great endeavor for the acclaim of the Hawaiian Lahui. We are also helping to move this project along with what little we have, being that this will help to perpetuate the great Moolelo of the Hawaiian People.

[The opening to the book “Ancient Hawaiian Music” reads:

A survey of ancient Hawaiian music was conducted, 1923–24, by Miss Helen H. Roberts under the auspices of the Hawaiian Folk-Lore Commission represented by John R. Galt, chairman; Edna J. Hill, secretary; Mrs. Emma Ahuena Taylor, Hawaiian member. In cooperation with the Commission, manuscripts resulting from the survey are published by Bernice P. Bishop Museum.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/6/1923, p. 2)

HE HANA MAIKAI E KOKUA IA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XVII, Helu 28, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 6, 1923.

Advertisements

Portuguese laborers, 1911.

MORE LABORERS TO BE OBTAINED.

On this Saturday, A. J. Campbell will leave Honolulu once again to go to get more laborers for the sugarcane plantations; it is believed that this mission to obtain laborers will be easier than the earlier ones.

Portuguese laborers are wanted most to come to Hawaii nei because of the belief that they are the best laborers, and being that there are many Portuguese now working in the sugar plantations, and that they wrote letters to their families behind, it has made them excited to come to Hawaii nei, and thus it is believed that his journey to fetch laborers will go smoothly.

When the board of immigration [oihana hoopae limahana] was asked if they were thinking about Chinese laborers, they denied this because the authorities in Washington are strongly against the importation of those people into the land; they are only in favor of European stock.

The entire expenses of Mr. Campbell’s travels will be paid by the board of labor [papa limahana], along with his salary of ten-thousand dollars a year.

[Here is a related publication available online:

FIRST REPORT OF THE BOARD OF IMMIGRATION TO THE GOVERNOR OF THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII.” Honolulu : Bulletin Pub. Co., Ltd., 1907-1911.]

(Kuokoa, 7/14/1911, p. 7)

E KII HOU ANA I MAU LIMAHANA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 28, Aoao 7. Iulai 14, 1911.

Meeting with Maori residents of Hawaii, 1920.

AUDIENCE WITH THE MAORI AT THE HOME OF MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

In the uplands of Manoa, at the home of Mrs. A. P. (Ahuena) Taylor, at “Luana Pua,” an audience was held to honor the Maori of New Zealand [Nu Kilani], living in this town; and attending were many Hawaiians, where they spent a long time, last night, meeting with the malihini, while they compared the old Hawaiian stories with that of the Maori people.

This is the second time which the Maoris appeared at the home of Mrs. A. P. Taylor, on that night, because of the desire of these malihini to have proper time for them to meet and discuss with the descendents of the important families of Hawaii nei.

Present were the descendents of the line of Kamehameha and Kalakaua on that night, there also were some kamaaina who had a deep understanding of the history of the Hawaiian people, to satisfy the desire of the malihini.

Within Mrs. A. P. Taylor, as well as in all of the people who gathered there last night, was the wish to find the genealogy shared between the Hawaiians and the Maori people, and that it be in accordance with the stories memorized by the Maori; and it is their true belief that the Maori came from the Hawaiians by Hawaiians travelling to New Zealand.

This night was spent with talking between the malihini and kamaaina, as the crowd was entertained by singing, while light foods were passed before all who were invited.

Amongst those present at this meeting was: Princess Kawananakoa, Kaukaualii Stella Keomailani Kea, Kaukaualii Kekaaniau Pratt, Judge S. B. Dole, Mrs. Mary Jane Montano, Edwin Kea, Kaukaualii Lucy K. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. E. Henriques, Mrs. E. M. Nakuina, Mrs. Irene Holloway, Mrs. K. Hutchinson, Misses Lani Mercy and Misses Lani Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. K. Beckley, L. Beckley, G. H. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Kahea, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. Taylor, Miss Mabel Taylor, Mrs. E. Straus, Mrs. K. Kali, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Lane, Mr. and Mrs. C. Maertens, Miss Anna Maertens, Mrs. E. M. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. I. R. Burns, Mr. and Mrs. H. Afong, Mrs. J. M. Riggs, Col. and Mrs. C. P. Iaukea, Mr. and Mrs. M. Ahia, Mrs. N. Mahelona, Misses Mahelona, Mrs. M. Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. D. Hoapili, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Hoapili, Miss Hoapili, A. Hoapili, K. Hoapili, G. Kealohapauole, Mrs. K. Mahoe, Mr. and Mrs. Hans Gittel, Mr. and Mrs. W. Simerson, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Harbottle, Rev. and Mrs. S. Kamaiopili, Mr. and Mrs. E. Boyd, Mrs. K. Wallace, Judge and Mrs. A. G. M. Robertson, Mr. and Mrs. Chillingworth, Mr. and Mrs. S. Chillingworth, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. F. Hons, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb, Mrs. E. S. Cunha, Miss Irene Dickson, W. A. Beckley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Kamanoulu, Mrs. J. H. Wilson, Rev. Akaiko Akana, Mrs. Niau Iaukea, Mrs. S. Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Hind, Miss HInd, Miss Mary Low, Mr. and Mrs. Eben Low, Mrs. Hannah Paris, Mrs. Caroline Robinson, Miss Kathleen Ward, Miss Lucy Ward, Miss Kulamanu Ward, Mr. and Mrs. Hanohano, Mrs. K. Bishaw, Mr. and Mrs. C. Long, Mrs. Lewis, Mrs. Mana, Mrs. Myra Iona, Mr and Mrs. E. W. Burgess, Mrs. P. Phillips, Mrs. M. Fernandez, Mrs. Edwin Fernandez, Rev. and Mrs. Maikai, Mr. and Mrs. M. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Irwin, Mr. and Mrs. D. Peterson, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Cottrell, Mrs. Hilda Techera, Mrs. Kamaka Stillman, Mr. and Mrs. Cushingham, Mrs. Ellen Dwight, Misses Holt, Mrs. C. W. Spitz, Mrs. T. B. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Constable, Captain and Mrs. W. E. Miles, Mrs. Victoria Buffandeau, Mr. and Mrs. W. Paikuli, H. L. Holstein, Carl Widemann.

[To have been a fly on the wall here…!]

(Kuokoa, 6/18/1920, p. 4)

KA AHA IKE A NA MAORI MA KA HOME O MRS. A. P. TAYLOR.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVIII, Helu 24, Aoao 4. Iune 18, 1920.