More on the sugarcane called, “pua ole,” 1858.

Pertaining to the non-flowering sugarcane.

The readers of the Hae Hawaii saw the statement of John Richardson [Ioane Richardson] pertaining to the non-flowering sugarcane of Waikapu, Maui. So that the accuracy or inaccuracy of this statement is made known to the people of Waikapu about this thing, here below is his letter speaking about their thoughts. Continue reading

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A sugarcane called “puaole” in Haiku, 1858.

Waikapu, Maui, October 14, 1858.

Rev. R. Armstrong.

Aloha oe:—I received your letter of the 9th of this month pertaining to the planting of our sugarcane [ko] in Haiku.

There is this, I have here in Waikapu a sugarcane called non-flowering sugarcane [ko pua ole]; perhaps there is a half an acre of this sugarcane growing in my fields. This sugarcane does not flower at all; and I know the truth of it not flowering, in 1849, 1850, and 1851. Continue reading

Impressions of Hawaiians and the Mammoth Anti-Annexation Petitions, 1897.

OUR NEW DIALECT.

How the Coffee-Colored Gentleman From Hawaii Greets Us.

Washington Post.

Four coffee-colored gentlemen, native Hawaiians, were at the capitol yesterday, at work against annexation. Their cards read as follows:

Hon. David Kolauokalani [Kalauokalani], president Hawaiian Association Hui.

Joseph Helehuhe [Heleluhe], K. C. K., secretary and agent H. M. Liliuokalani, commissioner Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Hon. James K. Kaulia, president Hawaiian Patriotic League.

Colonel John Richardson, K. C. K., commissioner Hawaiian Patriotic League. Continue reading

More on the Liliuokalani Church clock, 1892.

THE QUEEN AT WAIALUA.

Her Majesty’s Gift to Liliuokalani Church.

Her Majesty the Queen returned from her New Year’s trip to Waialua by yesterday afternoon’s train from Manana. The Queen and party greatly enjoyed their short stay at Waialua. There was no function given at the place except the presentation of a clock to Liliuokalani Church by the Queen, after whom the new church was called at dedication. Continue reading

Commission carrying the anti-annexation petitions, 1897.

THE APPEARANCES OF THE REPRESENTATIVES ARE FINE.

We have just seen in the newspaper the “Call” of San Francisco, portraits of the Representatives of the Lahui which were published in that newspaper, with appreciation and delight. Looking closely at all four of their portraits, they each appear fine and dignified, as if those are truly them from top to bottom; there is nothing for the eye to criticize. Also, that newspaper reports of their safe arrival, as well as a conversation of some of the Representatives with a reporter of the newspaper about annexation.

On their sides are portraits of Senators R. F. Pettigrew and Dubois, and both of their stories, from their arrival in Honolulu on the way to Japan, all the way to their return to America. Both of them are true friends to the Hawaiian, wherever they went and came in contact with our native people, but it will be the Senate that will confirm the truth of the words they planted in the hearts of the true Hawaiian people; we hope that the true outcome of their efforts for the good of the land, the people, and the Monarchy arises, and may God in His endless patience bolster their endeavors and progress, so that the journey of our Representatives is helped along. Let Hawaii live forever.

[See the issue of the San Francisco Call (11/28/1897, pp. 1 & 2) referred to in this article here.]

(Aloha Aina, 12/11/1897, p. 2)

ULUMAHIEHIE NA HELEHELENA O NA ELELE.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 11, 1897.

Excerpts of “Strangling Hands…” appearing in the Hawaiian-Language Newspaper. 1897.

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

[This article is taken from the famed “Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat” article by Miriam Michelson, which appears in the San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3. The introductory paragraphs go:]

For the benefit of our readers, we are taking some ideas printed in the newspaper San Francisco Call, written by the pen of Miss Miriam Michelson, on the deck of the ship, Australia, on the 22nd of September.

Remember that this woman newspaper reporter was the woman reporter present at the meeting of the Patriotic League of Hilo held at the meeting house of the Salvation Army in Hilo Town, and this is what she reported: . . .

(Aloha Aina, 10/16/1897, pp. 6 & 7.)

NA LIMA KAKAUHA MALUNA O KA PUA-I O KEKAHI LAHUI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 6. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Mai ka aoao eono mai.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke III, Helu 42, Aoao 7. Okatoba 16, 1897.

Strangling Hands upon a Nation’s Throat. 1897.

STRANGLING HANDS UPON A NATION’S THROAT.

[This is the famous article by Miriam Michelson who went to Hilo and wrote of an anti-annexation petition drive held there.]

(San Francisco Call, 9/30/1897, pp. 1–3.)

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1897-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/