The sugarcane called puaole grew 21 feet tall? 1866.

There is nothing longer. [Aohe no o ka loa.]—We just saw this Friday, in front of the Post Office, there was brought the longest sugarcane, propagated in the yard of Halaaniani, the town home of that son, the Great Major [William Luther Moehonua]. Continue reading

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More on the sugarcane called, “pua ole,” 1858.

Pertaining to the non-flowering sugarcane.

The readers of the Hae Hawaii saw the statement of John Richardson [Ioane Richardson] pertaining to the non-flowering sugarcane of Waikapu, Maui. So that the accuracy or inaccuracy of this statement is made known to the people of Waikapu about this thing, here below is his letter speaking about their thoughts. Continue reading

A sugarcane called “puaole” in Haiku, 1858.

Waikapu, Maui, October 14, 1858.

Rev. R. Armstrong.

Aloha oe:—I received your letter of the 9th of this month pertaining to the planting of our sugarcane [ko] in Haiku.

There is this, I have here in Waikapu a sugarcane called non-flowering sugarcane [ko pua ole]; perhaps there is a half an acre of this sugarcane growing in my fields. This sugarcane does not flower at all; and I know the truth of it not flowering, in 1849, 1850, and 1851. Continue reading