More from the Kawaihau Glee Club, 1905.

Loaa Ko Puni Kauoha.

Lihilihi o ka Lehua
Aala o ka Hinano
He nahele kii wai a ka ua
Koolua e lia mau nei. Continue reading

Kawaihau Glee Club, 1905.

HUI HIMENI KAWAIHAU.

The Kawaihau Glee Club will give a free concert at the Emma Square musical assembly this Tuesday, April 3. There will be performed enthusiastically, songs recently composed by Mekia Kealakai, Jim  Shaw and Solomon Hiram, some of the experts of that famous glee club from the time of the Monarchy. They will be fully attired in their uniform that they wore when they travelled the length and breadth of America. For the benefit of the lovers of songs of the Aloha Aina newspaper, we are printing those heart-grabbing songs that will be played that night. Continue reading

Kawaiahau Glee Club performs at Progress Hall, 1904.

A NIGHT OF PLEASURE OF HALALII.*

The Kawaihau Glee Club announced that it will hold a night of pleasure of Halalii at Progress Hall, on the Ewa corner of Beritania and Fort Streets, tomorrow night. The club will get together with all its eighteen members, offering their merry voices and joyous music, while those who go there will spin with their partners. Continue reading

“E O E Kalani Kaulilua” by Major Kealakai, 1924.

CORRECTION.

To the Kuokoa Newspaper; Aloha nui: So that people know the truth, I am Mekia Kealakai, the one who composed the kanikau of King Kalakaua, “E O E Kalani Kaulilua,” of the Kawaihau Glee Club which existed then. The ones who sang this dirge were these: Continue reading

A mele for Queen Kapiolani by the Kawaihau Glee Club, 1879.

HE LEI NO KAPIOLANI

[Composed by the Kawaihau Glee Club, Kapaa, Kauai]

1

E aha ana Moikeha
I ka lihi-kai o Puna?
E ana ana i ka loa,
I ka laula o Kapaa.

Cho.—O ka pa kolonahe a ke Kiu,
Hoolale waianuhea,
Kilikilihune mai ana,
I ka liko lehua a Pane [apane]. Continue reading

Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.

KAWAIHAU GIVES A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO THE BAND

KA HUI HIMENI ALII KAWAIHAU

Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)

HOOHAUOLI KALIKIMAKA KAWAIHAU I KA BANA

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Hawaii Ponoi Society performance, 1907.

ANCIENT HAWAII ON STAGE

The members of the Hawaii Ponoi Society will give an entertainment illustrating ancient Hawaiian customs at the Opera House on Saturday evening when the following program will be presented:

PROGRAM:

Overture

Kawaihau Glee Club

Tableau

Kaahumanu, Queen of Kamehameha I.

(At a hookupu function, the act of giving gifts by the people and the acceptance of same by the Queen, or by one in authority, as in other instances, being an ancient Hawaiian custom.)

Mrs. Kahaleohu.

Nose Flute Solo

Kaumaka.

Hula Uliuli (Gourd Rattle Dance)

Selection

Waikiki Mandolin Club.

Tableau

Liholiho and Kamamalu (Kamehameha II. and His Queen).

Ukeke Solo (Mouth instrument of wood and strings)

Kaumaka.

Solo

Miss Hao.

Hula Puili (Split Bamboo Dance)

Kaumaka.

Orchestra

Kawaihau Glee Club.

Tableau

Kaikilani, ancient Queen of Hawaii Island.

(a) The queen and her lord, Lonoikamakahiki, playing at a game of konane, similar to draughts; (b) a voice calls the queen; (c) her lord is enraged thereat, believing it an evidence of infidelity; (d) she is struck down; (e) the king deserts the queen, leaving her for dead; (f) their reconciliation.

INTERMISSION.

Orcestra

Kawaihau Glee Club.

Tableau

Keawe-nui-a-Umi, King of Hawaii Island, on a journey in search of his once favorite pilot and body servant, Kuapakaa.

Quartet

Hickey’s Quartet.

Hula Olapa (Swaying Dance)

Tableau

Boki and Liliha, his wife.

(The companions of Kamehameha II. and his queen on their trip to England, and who, upon their return with the corpses of their majesties (who both died in London in 1826) left the islands with a large retinue in several large canoes and were never heard of again.)

Waikiki Mandolin Club.

Solo

Mesdames Rose Kane and Punua.

Tableau

Kamehameha I.

(a) Kamehameha attacked by Ahia and his followers in a pitched battle; (b) he comes out victorious by breaking Ahia’s back in mid-air; (c) the Kamehameha statue, the whole concluding with a chorus.

FINALE.

J. W. L. McGuire, stage manager.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 3/15/1907, p. 6)

ANCIENT HAWAII ON THE STAGE

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLV, Number 7675, Page 6. March 15, 1907.

The Kawaihau Glee Club, 1904.

[Found under: “SOCIETY”]

The famous Kawaihau club, now reorganized under Charles Hopkins, who has done so much for Hawaiian music, and which has delighted society with its playing from the time of Kalakaua until now, gives, under the patronage of the Princess Kawananakoa, a dance at the Young Hotel on Friday evening next for which tickets are on sale at the drug stores, Wall Nichols, McInerny’s and Wichman’s.

Eighteen first class musicians, players and singers both, will give dancers a treat never before planned on such a scale. The musicians of the club are: Major Kealakai, Charles Palikapu, Sam Nainoa, John Edwards, John K. Nahaolelua, George K. Nahaolelua, Z. Kapule, Solomon Hiram, Jim Shaw, Jim Kulolia, Joe Kulolia, H. Keaweamahi, H. Paakea, Duke Kahanamoku, William H. Keawe, Ben Jones, Kalani Peters, and the program starting with a grand march at 8:30, and including a schotische and medley, reads as follows:

1.  Grand March and Waltz ….. Amistad
2.  Two Step ….. Hula o Makee
3.  Waltz ….. Wahikaahuula (Princess Kawananakoa)
4.  Two Step ….. Manoa Anuanu Wau
5.  Waltz ….. Waialae
6.  Two Step ….. He Manao
7.  Waltz ….. Hiu No Wau
8.  Two Step ….. Maunaloa

Ten Minutes Intermission.

9.  Waltz ….. Ko Leo
10. Schottische ….. Koni Au Ika Wai
11.  Two Step ….. Tomi, Tomi
12.  Waltz ….. Pulu Pe Ike Anu
13.  Two Step ….. Ai Aka Honehone Ana
14.  Medley ….. E Maliu Mai

EXTRAS.

1.  Two Step ….. Waikiki Mermaid
2.  Waltz ….. Halona
3.  Two Step ….. Lau Vabine
4.  Waltz ….. Puu o Hulu

Sonny Cunha is to be floor manager.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 6/19/1904, p. 6)

The famous Kawaihau club...

Sunday Advertiser, Volume II, Number 77, Page 6. June 19, 1904.

Hawaiian Music, an editorial, 1911.

How Hawaiian Music is Being Misconstrued!

Perhaps the thoughts of the Kuokoa may not be the same as those of others about the way Hawaiian music is being sung these days, but because we hold dear listening to the beauty and the sweet sounds along with the joy of the voices, therefore the Kuokoa takes up this matter.

It is not something that we Hawaiians should criticize, that singing is something we are proud of, and something that makes this race famous all around the world, by tourists who visit Hawaii nei and hear us singing our enjoyable and entertaining songs, as well as by singing groups being seen travelling about America.

If we were to turn back in time, to many years past, when the Kawaihau Glee Club and many other groups were famous for singing, we will see when comparing them to those performing today, the differences between them; our admiration will be taken by the singing of the old days, which many groups in some places around Hawaii nei still practice that way of singing Hawaiian songs.

Our Hawaiian mele are composed with their many kaona, and it is by how they are sung, if it is not made clear by the lyrics, that give appreciation and admiration to the listener, from Hawaiians to those that don’t know our language, because it is only through the melody of the song that that listener is entertained.

These days however, our singers are following haole style singing; and when songs that we are used to hearing along with their tunes which fill us with energy and enthrallment are changed, when listening to that it is like ridicule, for we are not used to hearing that kind of melody, and Hawaiian songs are not famous for that style of singing.

Our people, from the men to the women are talented with fine singing voices; it is a talent not widely spread amongst other people of the world, but it is not by the the way some people now are singing, but by singing songs as they were sung in years past.

Perhaps the vibrato and the slow and drawn out of singing matches haole songs of this age, but by changing the way Hawaiian songs are sung in this way, we at the Kuokoa are not mistaken when we say that it is insulting to the listener.

We don’t wish to call this person or that one not a good singers, but should we want our goal to be to preserve this fame through song, there is only one arena for us to stand before the other races, that is through expressing what God has given to every Hawaiian man and woman, without mimicking or emulating what other people are doing; lest what is seen by us as good becomes something that is not good.

We have nothing to say to those who are studying music in books; that will be a great benefit to some, but the good seen in one aspect will not get better by changing another aspect; so it is with our Hawaiian music, by changing how they are sung, it will not make them better.

Each and every Hawaiian is the true witness, and they are the perfect judge to weigh what we now discuss, not to criticize or to assail upon someone with words of persecution, but for our affection of the grandeur and true beauty of Hawaiian mele which each and every one of us all love and cherish.

[On a somewhat related topic about tradition and kuleana and mele, there is a very thought-provoking essay for composers and non-composers alike, by Kainani Kahaunaele, printed in The Value of Hawaii 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions, just recently out. In fact, if you haven’t got your copy yet, there are many stories by a wide range of writers in there that we should look at, and perhaps the many moolelo within the collection will then push us into thinking what we ourselves feel the value of Hawaii nei is and where we should be headed and what it is we need to do to get us there.]

(Kuokoa, 9/8/1911, p. 4)

PEHEA E HOOHEPAIA MAI NEI NA HIMENI HAWAII!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVII, Helu 36, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 8, 1911.