Royal Kawaihau Glee Club honors the Hawaiian Band, 1906.



Just as was announced last week that the Kawaihau Glee Club would give presents to the children of the band boys, that Glee Club did indeed do so on this past Friday night at Progress Hall.

There was a Christmas tree for the children with presents weighing down on its branches, which were given generously [for] the band members to see, things to give joy to their children; however, they were shocked by being each given envelopes with three dollars and sixty-five cents as a Christmas gift, something they did not bef0re dream of, that they too would receive Christmas presents.

This tree was brought some weeks ago from the…

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 1)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

…forests of Oregon, and it was right in the middle of the room where the tree was stood, with strings of tinsel glistening and candles shining on the branches swaying with snowballs filled with candy; and because of the low light in the room, the beauty of the festooned tree was clearly seen.

The Kawaihau Glee Club took their place atop the stage [awai], and there they opened with the song “Aloha oe,” and after they were done with that song, they played the “Kawaihau Waltz,” and that was when Santa Claus came in, that being O. Swain, and said that his sleigh was broken which was why the presents didn’t comewith him, but they were at the door, and some young singers brought the presents over to Santa Claus and he distributed them to the children and the room was just like a musical instrument shop with all the noise coming from the instruments of the children. Each of the children played trumpets like the Hawaiian Band (of Children).

The most amazing thing that night was the handing over of envelops to each of the band members with a present within, and after the presents were done being handed out, Mr. Naone stood representing the members of the Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] and gave their thanks to Sam Nainoa and his fellow members of the Glee Club for their honoring them; it wasn’t just something surprising for them, but something that gave them joy.

Sam K. Nainoa responded from the Glee Club and was appreciative that what was planned went smoothly, and for him were given cheers of joy.

There was also a light meal set out for the families of the band members, and they ate their fill of that food, and those that desired to dance, they went at it; were it not for the sleepy children the activities of the night would not have let out so quickly.

Let it be recalled that the money used for this gift giving, that being the money that Mr. Nainoa and his Glee Club worked for by holding a dance at the Young Hotel to help the Hawaiian Band who was at Nevada. The profit from that activity was two hundred and thirty-one (231) dollars.

(Kuokoa, 12/28/1906, p. 5)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLV, Helu 52, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 28, 1906.

Christmas at Washington Place, 1858.


Christmas—passed off in the good old fashioned style. The eve was ushered in by the assemblage, about 7 o’clock, of a large number of children and their parents at Washington Place, the Mansion of Mrs. Dominis, where Santa Claus had given out that he would hold his court, and distribute the gifts which he had ordered for the occasion. A magnificent “Christmas Tree” had been provided in one of the upper chambers, and the little folks, as they gathered about it with sparkling eyes and clattering tongues, found it all lighted up with candles, and the branches bending under the weight of gifts. Prompt as old father Time ever was, the bells were heard at the windows announcing:

“A miniature sleigh with eight tiny reindeer,
With a little old driver so lively and queer.” Continue reading

Mere Karikimaka, 1901.


Nearly 1,200 People Went to See.

Nearly 12 hundred People Went to See.

On Friday night last week, the Sunday School students of Kawaiahao were made happy because of the docking of the ship Alameida [Alameda] that evening with a kind, big old man named “Santa Claus.”

Before the time announced that the old man would be arriving, the great room of that church was packed with the Sunday School children and their parents, and in that crowd, the elders were seen:—Mr. and Mrs. Henry Waterhouse, Mother Castle, Rev. H. H. Parker, Mrs. Haalelea, Rev. S. L. Desha, and our other white friends.

Right before the pulpit, an arch [pio] was erected decorated with pine branches, and amongst these branches the light of electric lights could be seen, in the colors of the American flag: white, red and blue. In the middle of the arch was placed a large star made to be like the Star of Bethlehem which guided the wise men of the East to where the Messiah was born. In the Star was placed a picture of Maria with Christ in her loving bosom. It is truly lovely and beautiful for the heart of man to say.—”It is true, a Messiah was indeed born.”

Under this arch lay a table laden with presents that were made ready to give to the students.

Before the arrival of Santa Claus, hymns were sung and short speeches were given by the girls of the Kawaiahao Boarding School [Kula Hanai o Kawaiahao] and the Youth Class [? Papa Pokii] of Mrs. May Wilcox. Their performance was truly beautiful and sincere, and if the One for whom these celebrations were being held was present in His Actual Body, they would not be without His clapping. The Head of the Sunday School of Kawaiahao, Hon. Henry Waterhouse, gave some praising remarks, as did Pastor Parker [Paleka] and the Pastor of Haili, Rev. S. L. Desha, and the people gathered to hear their voices were joyous.

Being that the one much awaited for was a very kind old man, after the singing of some songs called in English, “Christmas Carols,” there was heard the sound of a conch, at which time was seen Santa Claus entering with his Presents, and he circled about the room giving presents to the children.

Here is some of what he said.—”I am happy to be with all of you. This is one of the most amazing lands for me. Where I live, there are many feet of snow now. When I landed with the steamer Almeida this evening, I was shocked that there was no snow here, so I did not bring my sleigh nor my deer, being that you all have street cars [kaa uwila].

The gifts prepared were handed out. Everyone was thrilled.

(Kuokoa, 12/27/1901, p. 5)


Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIX, Helu 26, Aoao 5. Dekemaba 27, 1901.