The Kawaihau Glee Club, 1904.

[Found under: “SOCIETY”]

The famous Kawaihau club, now reorganized under Charles Hopkins, who has done so much for Hawaiian music, and which has delighted society with its playing from the time of Kalakaua until now, gives, under the patronage of the Princess Kawananakoa, a dance at the Young Hotel on Friday evening next for which tickets are on sale at the drug stores, Wall Nichols, McInerny’s and Wichman’s.

Eighteen first class musicians, players and singers both, will give dancers a treat never before planned on such a scale. The musicians of the club are: Major Kealakai, Charles Palikapu, Sam Nainoa, John Edwards, John K. Nahaolelua, George K. Nahaolelua, Z. Kapule, Solomon Hiram, Jim Shaw, Jim Kulolia, Joe Kulolia, H. Keaweamahi, H. Paakea, Duke Kahanamoku, William H. Keawe, Ben Jones, Kalani Peters, and the program starting with a grand march at 8:30, and including a schotische and medley, reads as follows:

1.  Grand March and Waltz ….. Amistad
2.  Two Step ….. Hula o Makee
3.  Waltz ….. Wahikaahuula (Princess Kawananakoa)
4.  Two Step ….. Manoa Anuanu Wau
5.  Waltz ….. Waialae
6.  Two Step ….. He Manao
7.  Waltz ….. Hiu No Wau
8.  Two Step ….. Maunaloa

Ten Minutes Intermission.

9.  Waltz ….. Ko Leo
10. Schottische ….. Koni Au Ika Wai
11.  Two Step ….. Tomi, Tomi
12.  Waltz ….. Pulu Pe Ike Anu
13.  Two Step ….. Ai Aka Honehone Ana
14.  Medley ….. E Maliu Mai

EXTRAS.

1.  Two Step ….. Waikiki Mermaid
2.  Waltz ….. Halona
3.  Two Step ….. Lau Vabine
4.  Waltz ….. Puu o Hulu

Sonny Cunha is to be floor manager.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 6/19/1904, p. 6)

The famous Kawaihau club...

Sunday Advertiser, Volume II, Number 77, Page 6. June 19, 1904.

Hawaiians all over America! 1913.

THE GOOD STANDING OF THE HAWAIIAN YOUTHS.

IN THEIR EMPLOYMENT IN AMERICA.

[The issue of this Aloha Aina is misprinted as 1/11/1912, but it should be 1/11/1913! This sort of thing happens once in a while, and if you are not careful, it can lead to wild goose chases. Case in point: i don’t know how long i spent looking for the English article that this was taken from because i was looking in 1912… This article originates from the Honolulu Star-Bulletin (1/4/1913).

See the Star-Bulletin article here.]

(Aloha Aina, 1/11/1912 [1913], p. 1)

KE KULANA MAIKAI O NA KEIKI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 2, Aoao 1. Ianuari 11, 1912* (1913).