The pillow mele for Kaahumanu, and the power of the newspapers, 1907.

One reason why the newspapers were/are so important was because they were “immediate,” just as I suppose Facebook and Twitter is today. One person claims something in the newspaper one day, and a few days later you could see more information or contradicting information by someone else, and not necessarily even in the same newspaper. Because people back in the day wanted the latest news, they would subscribe to the different newspapers being printed at the time, or at least would share them with each other. Continue reading

John Papa Ii speaks of his aunty, Kaneiakama, 1869.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MOOLELO HAWAII.”]

And perhaps because of the skill of Kaneiakama at composing mele, that the chiefess [Kaahumanu] had a liking for her, and maybe that is why that land [Waianae] went to the two of them [Kaneiakama and her husband, Paakonia].

[John Papa Ii’s columns on the history of Hawaii ran in the Kuokoa from 1866 through 1870. For more on Kaneiakama see more from this date, and in English, see “Fragments of Hawaiian History,” translated by Mary Kawena Pukui, and published by Bishop Museum Press.]

(Kuokoa, 7/17/1869, p. 1)

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Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VIII, Helu 29, Aoao 1. Iulai 17, 1869.