More on the Wahiawa “healing stones,” 1927.

THE SUPERNATURAL ROCKS WILL BE LEFT IN THEIR PLACE.

At the meeting of the Daughters of Hawaii last week Wednesday in the Home of Queen Emma Kaleleonalani in Nuuanu, the association decided not to move the “Healing Stones” from where the two stand in Wahiawa; they made no decision to perhaps not move them for a time between three and six months and after that time, to take up again the question of those rocks.

When ayes and nays were asked for per the request explained earlier by Mrs. Julie Judd Swanzy and added to with small changes made by Mrs. F. A. Potter, there were three members who were opposed to the changes.

The decision by the association agreed upon that day, was in accordance with the decision by the President of the Board of Health, F. E. Trotter, that there would be no action upon on the matter of the rocks and that they’d be left where they stand now without being moved. With this decision by the Daughters of Hawaii, the ones who have responsibility over the rocks, dashed was the hope and request of 400 citizens of Wahiawa made to this association in a petition to remove the rocks from Wahiawa.

Another subject considered and decided upon by the association was this: there shall be no monuments built upon heiau. At that meeting, announced were pledges of $588, and cash donations of $1712, and funds of $341.72 for the restoration of that palace in Kailua, Kona, Hawaii [Hulihee].

Because of the rumor that the enthusiasm over the healing powers of the rocks are dwindling, which was known because less people go to worship the stones and because of less donations, this is the reason for the postponement by the association on action to be taken in regard to the rocks, with their belief that perhaps in a short few months the craze of the people over worshiping them will decrease drastically.

At that meeting of the association, there were many letters read by the President, Mrs. Swanzy, in front of the members gathered there, from different people dealing with the stones.

One of these letters was a petition by 400 people of Wahiawa asking to remove these rocks from there; three of the people who signed their names to the document asked that their names not be publicized and to take out their names from the list; there was a letter against the moving of the rocks to the Bishop Museum, where the stones would just be a “Collection” there; in another letter, it was asked to move the rocks to an area near the new road in Koko Head.

Mrs. Charles Clark asked to return these stones to the grounds of Kukaniloko; her idea was opposed by the majority of the members for the reason that the ancient history of these stones have nothing to do with the history dealing with the alii born at Kukaniloko, and therefore, it is not right to move them there. The rocks were moved to Kukaniloko at the order of Galbraith, because he thought they might be broken up where they stood beneath the stream.  The association does not want to return the stones there; they have been something much cared for by the Filipinos and others, and other stones of Kukaniloko have been cracked because of candles placed upon them, and the grounds are full of rotting fruits and flowers; and seeing those things which marred the beauty of the area was why they were moved to where they stand now. Those stones will not be considered again for return to Kukaniloko.

As for the $3000 in the bank, it is from donations made by people who went to worship the stones, but the association has not agreed to take a cent of the money, but it will instead be appropriated for use for works benefiting the people of Wahiawa.

(Kuokoa, 11/24/1927, p. 4)

E WAIHOIA ANA NO NA POHAKU KUPUA MA KO LAUA WAHI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXVI, Helu 52, Aoao 4. Novemaba 24, 1927.

Healing Stone (?) of Wahiawa, 1927.

Supernatural Rock of Wahiawa

Honolulu, Oct. 26—This rock being visited by people to worship these days is becoming something that truly is stirring the thoughts of some people here in Honolulu, and some who are living near Wahiawa are appealing to the Government and to the power of the Board of Health to move that rock from where it first stood, because in their opinion, this action by the people will cause an epidemic to grow here where all ethnicities are going and touching themselves against the bodies of others, and this will perhaps cause sicknesses to spread from one to another.

The Board of Health refused to step in and block this action by people who believe their ailments will be healed by touching the sick area to that rock of Wahiawa, and the birthing stones of the High Chiefs of this land in ancient times.

Some people have said that their weakness due to rheumatism by them going there and touching their areas of pain to that rock. Some say that their weak areas were not cured by touching the rock.

If the Naha Stone was not moved to the mauka side of the Hilo Library here, and it was left where it was from olden times, then the healing powers of these Birthing Stones of the sacred Alii of Hawaii and the Stone that Kamehameha the Great flipped over and which became a symbol of his victory over this entire Archipelago, and for which Kamehameha spoke these words:

“He Naha oe, a he Naha hoi kou mea e neeu ai. He Niau-pio hoi wau, ao ka Niau-pio hoi o ka Wao.”¹

With these words did Kamehameha put his shoulders up to the Naha Stone [Naha Pohaku], and flipped it over, being this was a stone that could not be moved by five men. Perhaps some sick with rheumatism will rub up their ailing places against the Naha Stone in the future.

[I was reminded of this by a picture of two stones with the caption “Sacred Stones at Wahiawa” from the Lani Nedbalek Collection displayed at the Pineapple Festival today.]

¹”You are a Naha, and it will be a Naha who will move you. I am a Niaupio, the Niaupio of the Forest.”

(Hoku o Hawaii, 11/1/1927, p. 3)

Ka Pohaku Kupua o Wahiawa

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXI, Helu 23, Aoao 3. Novemaba 1, 1927.