Child of Robert Waipa Parker born, 1889.

At 7:30 in the evening of this Sabbath at Hauhaukoi, Honolulu nei, born to the wife of Lieutenant Robert Waipa Parker, was a plump boy. The child was named Kawiwoole, because of the steadfastness of his father not to surrender the Palace on the day of the overthrow of the government [hookahuli aupuni] which R. W. Wilcox lazily dreamt up and was thwarted.

(Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, 8/10/1889, p. 1)

I ka hora 7:30 ahiahi...

Ko Hawaii Pae Aina, Buke XII, Helu 32, Aoao 1. Augate 10, 1889.

Columbia Records in Hawaii, 1911.

TO RECORD HAWAIIAN SINGING.

H. L. Marker, an employee of the Columbia Phonograph Company, arrived aboard the steamship Amerika Maru, and the main reason for his trip is to record Hawaiian singing in a horn [ipu leo] of the Company for which he works. There have been many a fake recording of Hawaiian songs, and after a close check, it was found that they weren’t Hawaiian songs.

Therefore, so as no more people purchasing music from this Phonograph Company will be deceived, that haole was sent here. Hawaiian songs and hula songs and chanting is what this haole will be recording in his horns. He will be travelling around the islands to accomplish this great effort, and when his work here is done, he will be going to Japan and China to do this job of recording songs of those people.

(Aloha Aina, 6/24/1911, p. 1)

NO KA HOOPAA ANA I NA LEO HIMENI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 25, Aoao 1. Iune 24, 1911.

Henry May & Co., Ltd. advertisement, 1919.

Tastigood

OLEOMARGARINE

Be careful about pronouncing the name correctly, and check if your merchant gave you the right package. Cut out this picture, and show it to your grocer, then he will know what to retrieve to give to you. He can get it from

Henry May & Co., Ltd.

Distributors [Poe Hoolawa]  Honolulu

SPREAD YOUR BREAD WITH

Tastigood

(meaning “Really tasty”)

Tastigood is a good condiment for spreading on bread, and at a much less expense than anything else, because it is low priced, keeps for a long time, and good to eat, and truly delicious.

(Kuokoa, 3/7/1919, p. 3)

Tastigood

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 10, Aoao 3. Maraki 7, 1919.

Autobiography of Joseph Kawai Opunui, 1929.

THE STORY OF JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AND HIS DESCENDANTS

Joseph Kawai Opunui was born on June 16, 1853 of Hapuku Opunui (m) and Kauhailama Waiwaiole (f) at Kalapana, Puna, Hawaii; and when he grew older, he would go around Kapoho, Puna; and when he was 15, came to Honolulu. Here he entered the English school at Kawaiahao in 1868, on the 3rd day of the month of May; David Malo was the teacher there. He stopped attending that school on July 20, 1870, and entered the Royal School of Kehehuna [Kula Alii o Kahehuna] in 1871. He left that school on April 6, 1872 and went to work for C. P. Ward [Ka Pepee] at Old Plantation as a grass cutter, as a pond worker at the pond of Koula, and as a coconut tree planter of the coconut grove growing there to the present.

He took a wife on October 6, 1873, and had his first child on September 29, 1874. My wife gave birth in Honolulu.

I took care of the jitney cart [kaa kika-ne] for my boss, Mr. Ward, for wages of four dollars a week. That was a lot of money in those days. After that, I went to work for Henry May & Co., food purveyors, weighing coffee, rice, sugar, potatoes, and so forth. They pay was ten dollars per week. I stayed with that employer until they merged with J. T. Waterhouse and McIntyer under the company name of Henry May & Co. It is still in operation today.

From there, I went to work for the government on roads for $1.25 a day, for 15 years. This was under the territory, and then 12 years under the county. I am retired now, but am receiving a pension.

This past 16th of June, I made 76 years old.

We have 1 son and 3 daughters from our loins;

Philamina, Joseph, Christina and Kealohapauole.

Philamina had 17 children. She was married twice. Her first husband was Herman Kaouli, and the second was William Keiki. With him she had six children, and with H. K. Ha’o she had eleven children.

The second child of Joseph Jr. died at the age of three.

One child is living in China. Kealohapauole is childless.

Between Philamina and Herman Kaouli, 2 children are living; with H. K. Ha’o, 2 children are living.

The first child is Margaret; the second child is Victoria. Margaret married J. Kaakua, and they had two children: Mary Laniwahine (deceased) and the second child, Hiram K. Kaakua.

Victoria married Isaac K. Kaawa and they had three children: Thomas K., Margaret Kahalelaulani, and Victoria.

The one living child of William K. Keiki is Clara, and she has five children: Philamina Nohokula, Manuel Kawai, Clara Hiilani, William Weheikekapu, and Frank.

Andrade is the name of Clara’s husband, and he is the father of those children.

I have three generations. With aloha.

Joseph Kawai Opunui

1805 Kalani St., Honolulu.

[I came across this interesting autobiography the other day. Usually, this type of information is submitted by someone else when a person dies, but here, Joseph Kawai Opunui is telling his own story.]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/27/1929, p. 4)

HE MOOLELO NO JOSEPH KAWAI OPUNUI AME KANA MAU MAMO

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 27, 1929.

Kuu Aina Hanau E. 1871.

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

1. Kuu aina hanau e,
Nou au e mele nei,
Aina maikai,
O na makua o’u,
Me na keiki pu,
E o, mai o a o,
Kuu mele nei.

2. Kuu aina hanau e,
Kuu aina makamae,
Aloha au
I kou mau kahawai,
Na kualono e,
Na kula uli mau,
He oli ko’u.

3. Hookani na laau,
Na aheahe hau
I kou maikai;
Poha na leo e
Mai na pohaku mai,
Kanaka, kamalii,
Hookani ae.

4. E ka Makua e,
Nou mai ka malu nei,
E haliu mai,
Hoomau i na maikai,
Ka maluhia e,
A nou ko makou ‘Lii
Ka hoomaikai.

Mele Kula Sabati.

My Dear Land of Birth.

1. My dear land of birth,
For thee I sing,
Beautiful land,
Of my parents,
And my children,
Respond from far and wide
To my song.

2. My dear land of birth,
My cherished land,
I love
Your rivers,
The mountain ridges,
The ever-green plains,
I am jubilant.

3. The trees sound forth,
The gentle cool breezes
Of your splendor;
The voices boom
From the rocks,
Men, children,
Sounding forth.

4. O Father,
From whom comes our protection,
Look down upon us,
Let the goodness continue,
The peace,
And for you, our King
Is the praise.

Sunday School Song.

[This is the song sung at the opening of the first meeting of the Kona chapter of the Kaahumanu Society held on  March 30, 1913. It is one of the many compositions of Lorenzo Lyons. The song was sung to the tune of “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,” and it seems some of the sentiment was taken from its lyrics as well.]

(Lau Oliva, 2/1871, p. 1)

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

Ka Lau Oliva, Buke I, Helu 2, Aoao 1. Feberuari, 1871.

Lei o Kaahumanu, 1916.

LEI O KAAHUMANU.

Lei Kaahumanu i ke aloha,
Lei haaheo i ka lanakila;
Lei i ka mamo hulu melemele,
Lei Hawaii i kou inoa.

Hui:

E ala e ka I ame ka Mahi,
E ala na kini o ka aina;
Hookahi puuwai me ka lokahi,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.

Eia ko lei e lei ai,
Na ke aloha i lawe mai nei;
I lei hoohie mau ia nou,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.

LEI OF KAAHUMANU.

Kaahumanu is adorned with a lei of aloha,
A proud lei in victory;
Adorned with the yellow-feathered mamo,
Hawaii is adorned by your name.

Chorus:

Rise, O I and Mahi,
Rise, O People of the land;
With one heart and in unity,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

Here is the lei for you to wear,
Carried here by aloha;
It is an ever distinguished lei for you,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

(Kuokoa, 12/29/1916, p. 2)

LEI O KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 29, 1916.

Kaahumanu Society Chapter V of Kona a century old! 1913 / 2013.

KAAHUMANU SOCIETY ESTABLISHED.

At 3:30 p. m. on Sunday, and through the kindness of Rev. E. S. Timoteo of the Church of Kealakekua, he allowed the coconut frond lanai of his home to hold the meeting to establish the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu] of the calm of Kona.

The members of the various branches of Kohala, Waimea, Hamakua, Laupahoehoe and the society of the famous rain of Hilo Hanakahi; they were members who came for duties of the Evangelical Association [Ahahui Euanelio], Sunday School Association [Ahahui Kula Sabati], and Christian Endeavor Association [Ahahui C. E.].

The meeting was presided over by the head president of the Parent Association of Honolulu, Miss Lucy K. Peabody, and the secretary of that parent association, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb took the minutes of the meeting.

The meeting was begun with the singing of the hymn, “Kuu aina hanau e” and a prayer given by S. L. Desha.  The proclamation was read by Mrs. Lahilahi Webb for the establishment of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, and at the completion of the reading of the text of the proclamation from the parent association of Honolulu, the establishing members of the new Association, Chapter Five, was made known.

There were twenty members who signed the membership book, and in that way, the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five was started; and at that time, an election was held to choose the officers of this association whose names are below:

Mrs. Esther Baker, president; Mrs. Kealoha Kamauoha, vice president; Miss Maggie Hooper, treasurer; Miss Sarah Kamauoha, secretary; Mrs. Lydia Kekuewa, vice secretary; Mrs. Kaai, auditor; and Mrs. Emily Haae,  committee of the whole [? komite nui].

After the election of the officers was over, all the members of the many associations stood along with the new members of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five, and the new members were adorned with paper lei, and at that time the members of Chapter Three of Hilo sang the song “Ka Lei o Kaahumanu.”

When that truly lovely song was being sung, the members were filled with awe and tears welled up in some, and the two mothers who established this junior Kaahumanu society felt that this was perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring initiations seen;  and after the song was over, the new association was blessed with a prayer by the brother of the Ahahui Kaahumanu, Rev. S. J. Desha of the Church of Haili, the one who is a great help to the efforts of the mothers of this association.

The money donated for the treasury of this new association was 27.75.

The sisters of the Kaahumanu committees who arrived and participated in the activities were these below:

Mrs. Hattie Hapai, the honorary president of the association of Hilo; Mrs. Alai Akana, president of the Association of Hilo; Mrs. Beke Keliikahi, secretary of Hilo; Mrs. Sarah Kaiwi, Mrs. Mary Kahenui, Mrs. Elena Mahaiula, Mrs. Helela, and Miss Kaimi Mahaiula, member of Hilo; Mrs. Emma Laeha, president of the association of Laupahoehoe, Mrs. Kealalaina Ne, from the association of Kohala, as well as Mr. Annie Hussey. Mrs. Becky Kawai and Mrs. Eliza Maguire from the association of Waimea, Mrs. Esther K. Haina, secretary of the association of Hamakua; Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana, Mrs. Haili Timoteo and Mrs. Bessie Kopa, from the parent association of Honolulu.

There were letters from Mrs. Aima Nawahi and Mrs. J. Saffery, the president of the Kaahumanu Society of Hamakua, expressing to their sisters of their aloha and of their support for this endeavor.

As for the two of us, the mothers who came to endorse this endeavor, we extend our unending thanks to the officers and members of the Evangelical association of the Island of Hawaii for their generosity in allowing us time to carry out our work for which we travelled over the ocean.

We also give our appreciation to the good kamaaina, Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Kamauoha, for their very kind hospitality in their comfortable home; and the head of the Church, Rev. E. S. Timoteo and his amiable wife, and we extend our thanks to the members of all the associations which joined in to help us for the good of the junior association of the calm of Kona. We also thank the brother of the Kaahumanu members, Rev. S. L. Desha, for his great assistance, as well as to our good sister: Mrs. Aima Nawahi for her assistance in planning to move the endeavor forward; and we also extend our thoughts of aloha and unending blessings to our kind kamaaina who lent her car to take us to where our duties took us, that being Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana of Honolulu.

We pray to our Heavenly Father to give great blessings upon us all; and we hope that with the assistance of benevolent God that you younger sisters of Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five  will move forward, and your works will progress, and may the sisterly love amongst us all last forever.

The two of us,

Lucy K. Peabody, president of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter 1.

Lahilahi Webb, Secretary.

March 31, 1913.

(Kuokoa, 4/11/1913, p. 2)

KU KA AHAHUI KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 11, 1913.

Mrs. Kiliwehi Hoapili Kaauwai passes on. 1873.

Mrs. Kiliwehi Kaauwai Dies.

On Wednesday, the 5th of November, the breath of this descendant of chiefs left her, after being sick for a long while. Perhaps some four months ago, she travelled to East Maui, and a short while after she reached there, it was heard that she was ill, and she remained in this state until returning to Honolulu, and at the request of her friends, she was taken to the Queen’s Hospital. There, Dr. McKibbin [Kauka Makibine], said that she had sickness that was curable if she followed closely the Doctor’s advice. She remained at the Hospital for a number of weeks, and when it was seen that she was becoming very weak, she was taken by her royal companion, Mrs. P. B. Bishop, to live with her these past days, and this was Kiliwehi’s last home where she dwelt until her death. This young chiefess is indeed one of the descendants of rulers, according to what we hear, of Kamehameha of Maui, who was called Kamehameha Ailuau; and not as was mistakenly heard, that she was a direct descendant of Kamehameha I. She died at the age of 33. At her funeral, she was escorted by her friends and her husband [Hoapili Kaauwai], and at the edge of her grave, her husband heart let out its regret with:

Adorned by a lei of pride
In friendless lands,
The link that has been severed,
From the companion—O Hoapili—e,
Much Aloha.

(Kuokoa, 11/8/1873, p. 2)

Make o Mrs. Kiliwehi Kaauwai.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 45, Aoao 2. Novemaba 8, 1873.

Kiliwehi Hoapili Kaauwai, 1873.

[Found under: “Local News.”]

Last Saturday, brought to Honolulu from Wailuku was one of the royal women who had gone on a tour of the world, that being Mrs. Kiliwehi Hoapili Kaauwai, with an ailing body, and here she is now at the Queen’s Hospital being treated. She had many a friend when she was in good health, but now, she perhaps is lacking in this medicine.

(Kuokoa, 10/18/1873, p. 2)

Ma ka Poaono aku nei i hala...

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XII, Helu 42, Aoao 2. Okatoba 18, 1873.