Columbia Records in Hawaii, 1911.

TO RECORD HAWAIIAN SINGING.

H. L. Marker, an employee of the Columbia Phonograph Company, arrived aboard the steamship Amerika Maru, and the main reason for his trip is to record Hawaiian singing in a horn [ipu leo] of the Company for which he works. There have been many a fake recording of Hawaiian songs, and after a close check, it was found that they weren’t Hawaiian songs.

Therefore, so as no more people purchasing music from this Phonograph Company will be deceived, that haole was sent here. Hawaiian songs and hula songs and chanting is what this haole will be recording in his horns. He will be travelling around the islands to accomplish this great effort, and when his work here is done, he will be going to Japan and China to do this job of recording songs of those people.

(Aloha Aina, 6/24/1911, p. 1)

NO KA HOOPAA ANA I NA LEO HIMENI HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVI, Helu 25, Aoao 1. Iune 24, 1911.