Thought while watching today’s happenings, 1/6/2021.

I ka ʻōlelo nō ke ola. I ka ʻōlelo nō ka make.

[Words to remember, whenever using words…]

(Olelo Noeau, p. 129)

Mary Kawena Pukui’s ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings, Bishop Museum Press, 1983.

Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society and the importing of plants and animals, 1865.

[Communicated.]

Mr. Editor:—The eminent success which has attended Dr. Hillebrand’s first consignment of plants and birds per Alberto for the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, ought certainly to operate as a stimulus to all who feel interested in the material progress of these islands, to lend a helping hand to enable him to avail freely of the facilities and opportunities he now possesses of procuring and forwarding here the vast number of plants, &c., suitable to our climate, Continue reading

On huli and planting and the ebook coming out from Bishop Museum Press, 1857/2020.

[Found under: “NO KA MAHIAI.”]

Not all kinds of huli are suitable for planting in wet patches. If the corm has been too closely cut off from the bottom of the huli and the huli itself is too small, it is not good for planting. If the taro has rotted and only a third remains good, Continue reading

Kalo planting and an ebook from Bishop Museum Press, 1922/2020.

[Found under: “KE ANO O KE KALAIAINA.”]

On  making loʻi if it was not done previously. I learned to make wet patches for four years at Lahainaluna. If it was desirable to convert a piece of dry land into a wet patch, they looked to see how water could be brought to it, because water was important. . . . If the patch was 20 fathoms long and 10 fathoms [anana, arm span] wide, we made them with shovels and the few pickaxes that we had. The soil near the banks was tossed up on them. The banks were made well, they were solid and thick. In digging with the shovel from the upper to the lower end and from one side to the other there was no part of the patch that was not dug. It looked level and even. Then the water was run into it and then the uneven places were seen, some deep, some high. The deep places were filled in. When it was seen that it was level then water was allowed to run in. We brought the oxen, that pulled the carts over the plains, and put them into the newly made patch and the oxen trampled on the earth up and down, to-and-fro. If we wanted some fun like the oxen, we increased the water in which to play. . . . Continue reading

Waters that cause one to droop.

This is similar to the saying about Pāʻieʻie in Hilo:

Luhe i ka wai o Pāʻieʻie. “Drooped over the pool of Pāʻieʻie.”

I seems Hilo was the place for that wai hooluhe.

[By the way, if you already did not know, ʻŌlelo Noʻeau is back in print! See the Bishop Museum Press website to order your copy!]

Mary Kawena Pukui, “ʻŌlelo Noʻeau: Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings” Bishop Museum Press.

It wasn’t only Kaʻū that dispatched oppressive aliʻi, 1865.

[Found under: KA MOOLELO O HAWAII NEI. HELU 14.]

During the period of Lonoikamakahiki, a section went to his older brother, Kanaloakuaana; Kona, Kohala, and Hamakua were ruled by Kanaloakuaana. Kau, Puna, and Hilo were ruled by Lonoikamakahiki.

There were many chiefs of Hawaii [island] who were warring, and there were many alii that were killed by the makaainana for their tyranny and for plundering the belongings of the makaainana. Continue reading

How bad leaders and their advisers were dealt with in Kaʻū, 1890.

INCIDENTS IN HAWAIIAN HISTORY.

Before Kamehameha the First had reduced the island of Hawaii to his subjection the various districts were ruled over by petty kings or high chiefs. Anecdotes of three of these aliis who successively ruled over the large district of Kau, are still current among the natives. They are not mythical, but actual events.

Koihala the alii of Kau was about making a voyage from Kona to Kau in his fleet of canoes. He sent word to his people of Kau to meet him with supplies of food on a certain day at Kapua.

The people cooked hogs, dogs and potatoes and prepared poi, water in calabashes and other supplies in sufficient quantities for the chief and his retainers, and started afoot with their burdens to meet him. On arriving at Kapua the fleet came along but did not stop. The alii called to the people ashore to go back to the next landing towards South Point. They resumed their burdens and retraced their steps to this place, the king proceeding by sea. At this place they were told to go on still further to another landing. This was repeated several times and they were finally told to climb the steep pali and meet the king at Kaalualu around and east of South Point. The people were tired, foot sore and hungry from their wearisome travel over the lava and determined upon a different reception to their alii from what he expected. They said “we will teach these chiefs a lesson not to wear us out with their capricious whims. We are hungry and we will eat the food and give him another article of diet instead.” So they sat down and ate up the food and filled the ti-leaf containers with stones and proceeded to near the coast and sat on a slight hill to await the coming of the chief and his party. He landed and proceeded up the ascent to receive his hookupu (tribute of food). When near, the people stood up and, taking the stones from the containers, threw them at the king and his retainers saying, “Here is your pig,” “Here is your dog,” “Here are your potatoes,” etc., and Koihala was killed. The stone, a short way on the road from Kaalualu to Waiohinu is still pointed out as the exact spot where Koihala—the exacting tyrant—met his death. Continue reading

Kawelo story, 1909 / 2009.

The Great Story

OF

KAWELO

The Foremost and the Powerful, the One Who Put
Down the Strength of Kauahoa, the Youthful Hero of Hanalei;

TO WHOM BELONGED THE FAMOUS CLUB KUIKAA,
AND HIS WAS THE TRIPPING CLUB-WIELDING WIFE,
KANEWAHINEIKIAOHA

The writer of this Moolelo gives first his New Year Aloha to the friends and companions of the Pride of the Nation [Ke Kuokoa Home Rula], before putting before them a short explanation about things pertaining to this story. Continue reading