Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto through the years, 2006.

WHAT LIES BENEATH: UNCOVERING ANCIENT TREASURES OF POLYNESIA

Photos courtesy of Yosihiko Sinoto

1955

A young Yosihiko Sinoto works at Makalai Cave, an archaeological site at South Point on the Big Island.

1961

Sinoto, right, and longtime colleague Kenneth Emory, at a dig on Maupiti in French Polynesia.

1982

On Huahine, Sinoto excavated planks, a paddle and, seen here, a mast from an ancient canoe.

(Advertiser, 4/9/2006, p. D1)

Advertiser_4_9_2006_D1.png

Honolulu Advertiser. April 9, 2006, p. D1.

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Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto and the great canoe, conclusion, 1978.

EXPEDITION CREW—Tim Lui-Kwan holds an unfinished canoe bailer found preserved on Huahine Island in Tahiti. Other early Polynesian artifacts on the table include Tahitian war clubs, called patus, and a tapa beater. From left are Elaine Rogers-Jourdane, Toni Han and archaeologist Yosihiko Sinoto.—Star-Bulletin Photo by Warren R. Roll.

PRESERVED LOG—A mastlike post is recovered from the Huahine pond.—Bishop Museum photo.

CANOE RELIC—Yosihiko Sinoto is shown digging a trench to look for the end of a plank believed to be part of an ancient double-hulled canoe.—Bishop Museum Photo.

Pieces of Ancient Canoe Found

Continued from Page One

…canoe plank, because of the L-shape, so what is it? That was the big question.

“SURPRISINGLY, we found a second piece about one foot below. The two pieces are the same size and the same shape.”

He said the logs that they found were round and well-worked and one was a boom to lash a canoe hull and an outrigger. “The form was very close to the Tahitian sailing canoe,” he noted.

After he returned to the museum, he began searching material on canoes in Oceania and studying canoe models to try and identify the large planks. Continue reading

Dr. Yosihiko Sinoto finds parts of great canoe, 1978.

Most Important Link to East Polynesian History

Parts of Ancient Canoe Found on Society Isle

By Helen Altonn
Star-Bulletin Writer

A Hawaii archaeologist has discovered what he believes are the remnants of an ancient double-hulled canoe such as described in Polynesian legends.

They are two large L-shaped boards, apparently the end splash boards of a double canoe.

“If it is a double canoe, the size is bigger than the Hokule’a,” said Yosihiko Sinoto, chairman of the Bishop Museum anthropology department.

He uncovered the boards and numerous other wooden objects, many associated with canoeing, in a pond on Huahine in the Society Islands.

Kenneth Emory, senior archaeologist as the museum, said the site is the most important found yet in revealing the early history of East Polynesia. “You have a cross-section of life at one moment of time before Hawaii and New Zealand were settled,” he said. Continue reading

Apapane flourishing, 1939.

Hawaiian Birds

We received word from the news released by the Hui Manuihi [?? Audubon Society ??] that there are now at Kilauea many apapane birds, and it is the one bird that is most widespread there.

Just like the work of those who research all sorts of things, there are some who made a move to study the different birds, and not only in other places, but here in Hawaii as well.

The activity of these people on Kilauea was to go into the forests to look at the Hawaiian Birds that are spread out there, and by them travelling the narrow paths in the Bird Park and entering into the Golf course and reaching the Soldier Camp at Kilauea and then arriving at Kilauea Iki; there were more Apapane than all the other birds put together.

With the research of the rangers of Kilauea National Park, they saw there was a large amount of bugs on the trees these days and that is was has caused an increase in the birds, for that is what the birds eat.

The number of kolea decreased and the mynah [piheekelo] birds are less, and it is believed because of the great cold.

Other Hawaiian birds seen at Kilauea these days are the amakihi and the elepaio.

Therefore according to this report shown, Hawaiian birds are indeed numerous, and the apapane is the most abundant.

[What about today? Are things better? Are things worse?]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/11/1939, p. 2)

Na Manu Hawaii

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXIII, Number 37, Aoao 2. Ianuari 11, 1939.

Greatest Mariners, 1938 / 2015.

POLYNESIANS AS MARINERS SEEN

Dr. Buck Terms Early Polynesians Greatest Mariners World Has Ever Known

HONOLULU, Nov. 29—Dr. Peter Buck, director of the Bishop Museum, last night termed the early Polynesians the greatest mariners the world has ever known.

Dr. Buck, who will leaves soon for Yale University to lecture on primitive religions, spoke at a dinner in his honor attended by almost 200 persons. He was introduced by Frank Atherton.

He said it was probable that some of the early Polynesians reached the shores of America. He traced the possibility in similarity of certain words, such as that for sweet potato itself was brought into the South Seas from the American continent. Continue reading

More blogs from the Bishop Museum: Anthropology, 2014.

This blog has been up for a little longer than the nupepa-hawaii.com blog has been up. If you are into anthropology of Hawaii and the Pacific, this is probably a blog you will enjoy. It is a little difficult to maneuver without any tags or many categories, but if you have the time to click back and forth, check them out.

ANTHROPOLOGY

Department of the Bishop Museum