Diamond Kekona passes away in Germany, 1922.

That Hawaiian Boy Dies in Germany

Diamond Kekona Grew Weary of This Life After One Week of Being Ill.

HIS WIFE WAS AT HIS DEATH BED

It was His Wife Who Announced the Sad News to Honolulu nei on Monday

On Monday, this town received the sad news about the death of Diamond Kekona, the son of D. K. Kekona of this town, in Berlin, Germany, on the 13th of last month, February.

It was Mrs. Diamond Kekona, the wife of Kekona, who sent the sad news of the death of her husband to Mekia Kealakai, the leader of the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii], because he was a friend of the young Kekona and his wife when they were all living in London.

A letter was also received by Mr. D. K. Kekona, the father of the young man, confirming the news about the passing of his son.

Diamond Kekona was born on the 6th of October, 1890, so at his death, he was thirty-three years old and some.

Diamond left Honolulu in 1905 for New York, with a group of singers and musicians. He spent many years in America in this occupation.

During the great war of the world, Diamond Kekona was in England, and he enlisted in the service under Britain, going off to war in France and Belgium. He married a British woman and had two children, however the two of them died.

At the end of the war, Mr. and Mrs. Kekona lived in Belgium, and just last year they went to Berlin, Germany, where they met up with Joe Puni, William Kanui, and Joseph Nihali [?]; but according to the letter of Mrs. Kekona, he did not get along with Joe Puni, and they did not talk.

Mr. Kekona was not sick for long before he died, it was just a week; and in the letter his wife wrote to Mr. D. K. Kekona, she told him of her intent to return the body of her husband to London to bury, in her homeland, close to her home.

With the passing of this Hawaiian youth in foreign lands, he left behind, grieving for him: his young British wife; his grandmother, Mrs. Makalohi, who is 91; his father, Mr. D. K. Kekona, working in the sheriff department and a pastor of the Christian Science Church [Hoomana Naauao]; two younger brothers named Hugo and August Kekona; and their sister, Mrs. Lonohira [Mrs. George Lonohiwa]; and a big family.

(Kuokoa, 3/22/1922, p. 1)

Make Ia Keiki Hawaii Maloko o Kelemania

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 12, Aoao 1. Maraki 22, 1922.

A Touching letter from Diamond Kekona, in far away Britain, to his father in Hawaii, 1916.

LETTER FROM BRITAIN

Dear Papa:–Here are some words for you; my wife and I are healthy, and we are believing that you and the family are doing likewise. My dear wife is completely cured of her sickness, after I put great efforts into finding a cure–partly as a result of the doctors and partly because of the Lord Jesus Christ–as I prayed all the time to the Lord to give health to my wife, as you instructed me earlier.

She was sick for 12 weeks from the time she gave birth, and because of God’s love she regained her health. I take her walking around every day for 2 hours, and she is beginning to eat and regain her weight.

Father, I have joined the armed forces, as I told you earlier. The doctor gave his permission, and I received my papers, to the regiment #30, of married men, under the command of Lord Derby. I wear the symbol of my regiment on my left arm, just as other soldiers do in the army of Britain. I will receive my orders in June or July to proceed to the battlefield without delay for the honor of the Hawaiian people and for the flag of the homeland of my beloved wife.

We will send you a picture on the next boat, and when I receive my uniform, I will send you a picture, and that will be my last picture for who knows how long, but I find my relief in God. Tell August Kekona, don’t come to this land; there are no jobs, no money, there is lack in daily needs; tell him to go to America because it is a land where you can make it, where you can make money and get other things to make you happy. I say this because I was there for many years. Tell him my advice. I am thinking this is enough writing for the time being. Papa, give my love to Kuku Makalohi and uncle, Mrs. Lonohiwa, Bro. August and Hugo Kekona, and the rest of my love, to you my Papa. You son,

DIAMOND KEKONA,
87 Blackwell St., Kidderminster, England.

Aloha Papa:–Here are some thoughts to you, those being these: I am doing well, I am over my sickness, because of the tireless efforts of my loving Daimana for me.

Papa, tell August Kekona, don’t leave Hawaii. If he listens to my advice, he will be happy; he should live in Honolulu with you. There is no work for men here; women work, and take care of their husbands. Women are more than half of the workforce here in Britain now. Also, the pay here is very low. Papa, you are probably puzzled that my Daimana has joined the 30th regiment of married men, under the command of Lord Derby. I believe that this war is one of the worst; I am very afraid. There will be many more casualties of the men joining this war–both from the Allied side and the German side, before the war is over.

Daimana and I sent our picture to you, but my picture isn’t so good because I have just recovered from my sickness. I will go again later to take a picture and send it to you. I look at my picture and it is as if I am a totally different girl. I think I will end here. I wish you and everyone there the best in this new year. Papa, don’t forget to give my aloha to Mrs. Lawe Lonohiwa (I will write her when I have some time). Give my love to August Kekona. Your daughter,

AMY KEKONA.
78 Blackwell St., Kidderminister, England.

(Kuokoa, 2/18/1916, p. 2)

LETA MAI PELEKANE MAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 7, Aoao 2. Feberuari 18, 1916.