Kohala Hula Club and Emma Moniz, 1936.

HAWAIIAN TABLEAU TO BE PRESENTED HERE

The Resurrection of Kaha, a Hawaiian tableau directed by Mrs. Emma Moniz, of Kohala, will be staged next Saturday, April 18, at the Halai community Hall, Hilo, under the auspices of the Kohala Studio, beginning at 7:30 p. m.

Besides the tableau, based on a native legend, Mrs. Moniz will stage a program of ancient and modern hula dances featuring several of her most talented pupils. There will be some 40 performers, all of them from Kohala, including a number of Filipino, Japanese and Portuguese dancing girls, besides Hawaiian.

Two novelty number by Eko [? Eiko] Takata, four-year old Japanese girl, and Elsie Adana, two-year old Filipino girl, will be featured. The program will be followed by a dance, with Kualii’s orchestra furnishing the music.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/15/1936, p. 1)

HAWAIIAN TABLEAU TO BE PRESENTED HERE

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXII, Number 39, Aoao 1. April 15, 1936.

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Sam Lia Kalainaina’s daughter weds, 1940.

A FINE MARRIAGE

MR. AND MRS. EMILIANO BARROGA

Joined in the holy covenant of marriage were Miss Anna Keolaanalani Lia Kalainaina, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Lia Kalainaina of Kukuihaele, Hamakua, with Emiliano Barroga, a Filipino youth, an Owner of some passenger buses between Kukuihaele, Honokaa, and based in Hilo, and he holds many shares in a Insurance group in Manila; by the Catholic Priest, Father Henry, at the Catholic Church of Honokaa, on August 31 at 6:00 P. M.

After the ceremony was over, married couple, the parents, and the crowd headed for Kukuihaele Hale, as the family and many friends of all ethnicities were waiting to welcome them with a great Banquet to honor the Young Couple. Continue reading

The passing of Jack Kuamoo, 1913.

JACK KUAMOO HAS PASSED AWAY.

He is one of the members of the Royal Hawaiian Band [Bana Hawaii] established by Professor Northcock, a British man, and under his instruction, Jack Kuamoo acquired a superior talent in playing the smaller drums. There is no one amongst the Hawaiian people and amongst those who play the smaller drums of our band these days that can follow after the talent that Jack Kuamoo had.

In 1895, the Royal Hawaiian Band went to America under the leadership of Professor Libornio, a Filipino, and his abilities in drumming smaller drums diminished in the places where we in the band played. He was a known expert in his talent taught to him until proficient, and it is the old kamaaina of Honolulu nei who are the witness to this.

With his death, he left behind three of his old friends still living: Frank Mahuka, living with his children, grandchildren and many of his family in Kalihi Camp; James Pohina, and the one writing this [Samuel K. Kamakea], still with the band today. All of the old ones of this profession in 1870 have died, and we are the old members left alive today. But we are to follow too on the same path, so who amongst us three will be the one to go after Jack Kuamoo.

Because of the unforgettable remembrances of Captain H. Berger for Jack Kuamoo, he was invited by the members of the Band to offer some dirges at the crypt of Manuel Silva, and the loving invitation by the band was accepted, and at half past three in the afternoon of this Wednesday, the band played some mele kanikau for Jack Kuamoo.

We, the old members of the band, are giving our right hand of true aloha, and join with you O Wife who is left without a husband, and grieve with you, and mourn with you, and carry with you the sadness borne upon you; and may the Heavens wash away all of the streaks of tears from you.

We with sincerity,

FRANK MAHUKA,

JAMES POHINA,

SAMUEL K. KAMAKEA.

[Does anyone know who the Professor Northcock mentioned refers to?]

(Kuokoa, 9/26/1913, p. 3)

O JACK KUAMOO UA HALA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 38, Aoao 3. Sepatemaba 26, 1913.

Birth announcement outside of the vital statistics column, 1913.

A ROSE BUD HAS BLOSSOMED IN A FOREIGN LAND.

When the steamship arrived last Tuesday, joyous news was received by Mr. Pahu, the birth father of Mr. S. K. Pahu who lives in Manila, about the blessing of their garden with the birth of a well-developed girl, on the 21st of this past month, August. The child is healthy, and so too are the parents.

The name of the newborn was soon called Muriel Evelyn Pahu; and the old man has become a grandfather! It is the prayer of the Kuokoa that the child lives long, and that her days be accompanied by many blessings!

(Kuokoa, 9/19/1913, p. 1)

HE OPUU ROSE UA MOHALA MA KA AINA MALIHINI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 37, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 19, 1913.

Sending mynahs to the Philippines, 1928.

PHILIPPINES TELEGRAPH TO SEND OVER BIRDS

For the first time it is believed that the mynahs have value, being that there was received a telegraph from the Philippines from R. H. King of Honolulu to send birds caught to him. This haole is advertising in the newspaper that he will give a half dollar for young and adult birds brought to him if they are alive and healthy. These birds are wanted in the thousands to be taken to the Philippines to kill off the locusts destroying the crops there.

This land and we as well will be blessed to be rid of these birds that take away food.

[This sounds a little messed up…]

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/28/1928, p. 4)

KELEKALAPA O PILIPINE I NA MANU E HOOUNA IA AKU

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 1, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 28, 1928.

D. S. K. Pahu writes from the Philippines, 1912.

OUR LETTER FROM THE PHILIPPINES.

THAT BOY TELLS HIS FATHER OF THE GREAT AMOUNT OF GOVERNMENT LAND.

Baguio, Benguet, Philippines.

O My Beloved Father:

Here we are, the two of us, now living in the mountains. We got back on the 17th. Live here is good; the air is brisk, and the only trees that grow in abundance on this mountain are pine. I am thinking that we will be here until the last week of June.

It is not certain whether I will stay here for a full three years. This is a fertile land if you have a lot of money. I met up with a haole man who is the secretary of a Filipino organization here, and he wants me to write about sugar in Hawaii and to publish it in the local papers. He tells me that there are vast and much government lands that are left unfarmed because of lack of funding. If I want land, he can definitely help me to ask for government land. Looking at the worth of sugar in Hawaii, I believe that money can be made through this endeavor. there are a lot of sugar lands here, however, the sugar mills are decrepit and sugar has been pushed to the side; the people here do not understand the sugar industry as they do in Hawaii. That is what makes me want to write about sugar. Here’s something else: Hawaii’s people have their eyes set on here, and a couple of weeks ago, a haole man came from Hawaii to look at the land here with the intent of building a modern sugar mill like in Hawaii. If everything goes well, I am determined to leave this job and to start a large sugar plantation here, and I’ll return to Hawaii to work out the selling of shares [kea] and the purchase of a mill and so forth; I have written to some people in Honolulu about this venture, and if things go well, I will come home to Hawaii in two years, but if they do not go well, I suppose I will wait it out.

I saw the Exposition here [Philippine Exposition held in Manila, February 3–11, 1912], and there are many goods from here. Sugar, coconuts, manila rope, rice, gold, silver, charcoal, and so forth were the things on display. The wood of this land is beautiful, used to make chairs and tables. One of the tables was 10 feet long across the middle, and 40 feet long across the edges, made out of one tree without the addition of other boards. The performances by school children was full of beauty; the lace, household furnishings, hats, clothing, and so forth were lovely and fine. Better than Hawaii.

With aloha from the daughter and from me as well.

Me.

D. S. K. PAHU.

(Aloha Aina, 7/27/1912, p. 1)

KA MAKOU LETA MAI MANILA MAI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 30, Aoao 1. Iulai 27, 1912.

Because February shouldn’t be the only Hawaiian Language month… 1948.

THE MOTHER TONGUE

We frequently speak to our dear readers about our Mother tongue, not about our teaching them the Hawaiian language, but that the light of our beloved language from our forefathers is being extinguished.

Being that this is a new era, and we see and realize that there is a drastic reduction in the number of our generations capable in our mother tongue. There are many of our youths these days who have no knowledge of our language, but when you listen to them singing, they sing Hawaiian songs. Sometimes when our children speak Hawaiian, their production of the language is so strange, and sometimes our naau [gut, heart] aches at their mispronunciation of words.

There are many Hawaiian songs sung with incorrect pronunciation. Our children are neglecting trying to acquire knowledge and proficiency in speaking the mother tongue. Look at the other ethnicities like the Filipinos and the Japanese, they haven’t forgotten their language. If parents spoke in their own language then the children would hear; and when we talk to them, they’ll ask, “he aha kau e olelo mai nei? [what are you saying?]”

Some people bewail, “If only Hawaiian-Language Schools were reopened, that would be a good thing because we’d get knowledge and proficiency in the Hawaiian language and it would revive our language.”

That is astonishing. Should a young Hawaiian have the desire to acquire knowledge and competency in the Hawaiian language, he should try to get this competency by studying diligently by himself and to get together with an adult for help and there would be great progress. Some say that Hawaiian can be gotten just like that, not like the languages of other people. Perhaps it is true, but if you go back and think with great seriousness, you will see that the Hawaiian language is not easy.

Within the many Hawaiian words, spellings might be the same, but the pronunciation and meanings of those words are different.

One thing that will give every youth proficiency is the reading of Hawaiian newspapers and Hawaiian books like perhaps the bible. Those things will give knowledge and competence in our native language.

We point out that because of the great love of a certain father, Joseph N. [Nihiaumoe] Koomoa, for the Hawaiian language, he thought it would be important to publish some Hawaiian songs and Hawaiian Hula and print some booklets, and through that someone could make time to read the Hawaiian language and perhaps that way the person could pronounce the words while understanding the kaona [underlying meanings].

This man sent those Hawaiian songs and hula to a Newspaper company to be printed in booklets, and it will be sold to the person or persons who want those books. This is a good idea of Joseph Koomoa’s, and we hope that your books that are being printed will become books that give knowledge to the Hawaiian youths of this age and of the future. Aloha to us, O Hawaiians.

Should you want one of those books, they will be available at the shop of that Hawaiian on Waianuenue Avenue, and also the former fire station [?] According to what was announced, the books will probably cost 35 cents each.

We want our youngsters to get a hold of this and and improve themselves to the best of their ability so that they can get proficiency in our mother tongue. Letting these go would be like forgetting our own selves.

“RISE YOUNG HAWAIIANS, GRASP OUR MOTHER TONGUE AND GO FORTH AND LET US BE TRIUMPHANT BY BEING PROFICIENT IN THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE.

Forge forward with no fear. So that you can get knowledge and proficiency in your own language—that will be your triumph.

We give our congratulations to you, Mr. Joseph Koomoa, for you attempt to revive the prized language of ours. You will be helping for all times [E kokua mau ia mai nohoi oe i na wa apau. ?]

Help ourselves Hawaiians, and don’t let the benefits go to those others [E kokua iho nohoi ia kaua Hawaii, aole hoi hoolele aku i na pomaikai ia lakou ma. ?]

[Anyone know of any copies of these music booklets by Joseph N. Koomoa still in existence???]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 2/11/1948, p. 2)

Ka Olelo Makuahine.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XLI, Number 19, Aoao 2. Pepeluali 11, 1948.