Death of Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai, 1928.

Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai Passed on.

At 10 o’clock P. M. of the evening of Wednesday, death visited the home of Mrs. E. A. Nawahi at Homelani, and took the life breathe of her youngest sister Mrs. Mihana K. Ai, at nearly 66 years of age. She was born here in Hilo, on the 24th of April in the year 1862 from the loins of Kahaoleaua and Ai-i, her father, one of the first Chinese who arrived in Hilo nei, and he arrived along with Hapai, Akau, Keoni Ina [John Ena], Akina, Keoniko, and Aiko, and these Chinese were the first ones to start Sugar Plantations at Amauulu, Paukaa, Kaupokuea [Kaupakuea], and Kohala.

Their parents had five of them, the first born was Mrs. Aana Kekoa, then next was Mrs. E. A. Nawahi [Emma Aima Nawahi], and Mrs. Alai Akana, and Mrs. Aoe Like who died earlier, and Mrs. Mihana Kalaniwahine Ai their youngest. She married Simeona Kealoha of Honomu in her youth, and after some years of them living in the bond of matrimony, they were separated, and Mrs. Mihana remarried with Mr. Ai who is now living. She was a member of the Haili Church, and she remained in that church until the time when death released her. She was a fine member of the Kaahumanu Society [Hui Kaahumanu] here in Hilo, and she was a good member of the Hale o na Alii. Continue reading

Mrs. J. P. Kahanamoku passes on, 1936.

MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU SETS THIS LIFE ASIDE

SHE WAS A MOTHER GREATLY BELOVED BY ALL

Mrs. Julia Paoa Kahanamoku left this life at 69 years old, and she is the mother of Sheriff Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. At 9 o’clock or so in the morning of this past Thursday, June 4, she left this life behind, at her residence at 1847 Ala Moana Road, after going into a decline through weakness for a long time. Her husband preceded her in death many years ago, Captain Duke H. Kahanamoku.

She was born here on Oahu, and she spent most of her life in Waikiki. She descended from the lines of the I and Mahi of Hawaii, …

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 1)

WAIHO MAI O MRS. J. P. KAHANAMOKU I KEIA OLA ANA

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 1. Iune 11, 1936.

…from ancient times, and her birth father, Mr. Hoolae Paoa, was one of the people who oversaw many ahupuaa during the monarchy. She was a full Hawaiian by birth, as well as was her husband.

During her healthy days, she participated in many promotional activities in this land. During the years of the great world war [WWI], she put herself out doing all the work of the Red Cross [Ahahui Ke’a Ulaula] in Honolulu;* she was a member of the Kapiolani Maternity Association, Daugthers of Hawaii, and a member of the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu].

Mrs. Kahanamoku had six sons, boys who each went off to find his own fortune, boys who participated greatly in promotional activities as well as body-strengthening events in this land. She has two girls who are living, and one who passed some year ago; the ones living are Bernice and Kapiolani, and the third who died was Maria.

Her ashes were buried at the cemetery in Nuuanu.

This Newspaper joins in on the grieving with this family of children who are bereft of their parents, as well as the rest of the family; and we humbly beseech that the sad thoughts of this family of children and all of the ohana as well be lightened.

*It is no surprise that Duke himself was knitting warm clothes for the Red Cross!

(Alakai o Hawaii, 6/11/1936, p. 4)

...au kahiko, a o kona luaui makuakane...

Ke Alakai o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 9, Aoao 4. Iune 11, 1836.

150 years ago—The beginnings of the Kaahumanu Society, 1864.

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

I am V. K. Kaninaulani, along with A. Pauahi,¹ and L. Kamakaeha, are the Officers of this Association, of the Town of Honolulu, Island of Oahu, of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Because of our desire to announce this fine endeavor amongst ourselves and the people, we come together to undertake these tasks.

CONSTITUTION.

Clause I. This Association was established at Kawaiahao, Honolulu, on this day the 8th of August, 1864. This Association is officially called, “Ahahui Kaahumanu.”

Clause II. The Officers of this Association are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary, the Vice Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause III. This Association was established to assist each other member of this Association when they are in need (in sickness, poverty, and death)

Clause IV. The yearly meeting of this Association will be on the second Monday of August of each year, and a yearly Banquet will be held on the last day of August every year in Honolulu nei, at the location designated.

Clause V. The Association will supply Record Books [Buke Oihana] of the Association, as well as any other expenses for the President, Secretary, and the Treasurer.

Clause VI. The President will select Executive Committees for this Association, and they will prepare lists of names of those who want to present themselves before the Association.

Clause VII. Should a member of this Association die, then the President or if not the President, then a representative will order by Executive Committee to gather in mourning attire at the place of the deceased for the funeral over her body.

Clause VIII. The President of this Association is empowered to establish other Associations on the other islands of this Nation.

Clause IX. The Association shall resolve all problems and difficulties brought before it from other lands.

Clause X. The Treasurer may expend all funds at her disposal with the approval of the President.

Clause XI. Members of this Association shall pay a dollar and a half ($1.50) yearly, or installments of an eighth ($0.12.1-2) every month; it is not prohibited to give more.

Clause XII. Clauses of this Constitution may be changed after one year.

¹Pauahi is often referred to as A. Pauahi. [Would there be anyone who knows what that initial stands for?]

(Kuokoa, 8/20/1864, p. 4)

Ahahui Kaahumanu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke III, Helu 34, Aoao 4. Augate 20, 1864.

Kuu Aina Hanau E. 1871.

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

1. Kuu aina hanau e,
Nou au e mele nei,
Aina maikai,
O na makua o’u,
Me na keiki pu,
E o, mai o a o,
Kuu mele nei.

2. Kuu aina hanau e,
Kuu aina makamae,
Aloha au
I kou mau kahawai,
Na kualono e,
Na kula uli mau,
He oli ko’u.

3. Hookani na laau,
Na aheahe hau
I kou maikai;
Poha na leo e
Mai na pohaku mai,
Kanaka, kamalii,
Hookani ae.

4. E ka Makua e,
Nou mai ka malu nei,
E haliu mai,
Hoomau i na maikai,
Ka maluhia e,
A nou ko makou ‘Lii
Ka hoomaikai.

Mele Kula Sabati.

My Dear Land of Birth.

1. My dear land of birth,
For thee I sing,
Beautiful land,
Of my parents,
And my children,
Respond from far and wide
To my song.

2. My dear land of birth,
My cherished land,
I love
Your rivers,
The mountain ridges,
The ever-green plains,
I am jubilant.

3. The trees sound forth,
The gentle cool breezes
Of your splendor;
The voices boom
From the rocks,
Men, children,
Sounding forth.

4. O Father,
From whom comes our protection,
Look down upon us,
Let the goodness continue,
The peace,
And for you, our King
Is the praise.

Sunday School Song.

[This is the song sung at the opening of the first meeting of the Kona chapter of the Kaahumanu Society held on  March 30, 1913. It is one of the many compositions of Lorenzo Lyons. The song was sung to the tune of “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,” and it seems some of the sentiment was taken from its lyrics as well.]

(Lau Oliva, 2/1871, p. 1)

Kuu Aina Hanau e.

Ka Lau Oliva, Buke I, Helu 2, Aoao 1. Feberuari, 1871.

Lei o Kaahumanu, 1916.

LEI O KAAHUMANU.

Lei Kaahumanu i ke aloha,
Lei haaheo i ka lanakila;
Lei i ka mamo hulu melemele,
Lei Hawaii i kou inoa.

Hui:

E ala e ka I ame ka Mahi,
E ala na kini o ka aina;
Hookahi puuwai me ka lokahi,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.

Eia ko lei e lei ai,
Na ke aloha i lawe mai nei;
I lei hoohie mau ia nou,
E ola ka inoa o Kaahumanu.

LEI OF KAAHUMANU.

Kaahumanu is adorned with a lei of aloha,
A proud lei in victory;
Adorned with the yellow-feathered mamo,
Hawaii is adorned by your name.

Chorus:

Rise, O I and Mahi,
Rise, O People of the land;
With one heart and in unity,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

Here is the lei for you to wear,
Carried here by aloha;
It is an ever distinguished lei for you,
May the name of Kaahumanu live.

(Kuokoa, 12/29/1916, p. 2)

LEI O KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LIV, Helu 52, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 29, 1916.

Kaahumanu Society Chapter V of Kona a century old! 1913 / 2013.

KAAHUMANU SOCIETY ESTABLISHED.

At 3:30 p. m. on Sunday, and through the kindness of Rev. E. S. Timoteo of the Church of Kealakekua, he allowed the coconut frond lanai of his home to hold the meeting to establish the Kaahumanu Society [Ahahui Kaahumanu] of the calm of Kona.

The members of the various branches of Kohala, Waimea, Hamakua, Laupahoehoe and the society of the famous rain of Hilo Hanakahi; they were members who came for duties of the Evangelical Association [Ahahui Euanelio], Sunday School Association [Ahahui Kula Sabati], and Christian Endeavor Association [Ahahui C. E.].

The meeting was presided over by the head president of the Parent Association of Honolulu, Miss Lucy K. Peabody, and the secretary of that parent association, Mrs. Lahilahi Webb took the minutes of the meeting.

The meeting was begun with the singing of the hymn, “Kuu aina hanau e” and a prayer given by S. L. Desha.  The proclamation was read by Mrs. Lahilahi Webb for the establishment of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, and at the completion of the reading of the text of the proclamation from the parent association of Honolulu, the establishing members of the new Association, Chapter Five, was made known.

There were twenty members who signed the membership book, and in that way, the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five was started; and at that time, an election was held to choose the officers of this association whose names are below:

Mrs. Esther Baker, president; Mrs. Kealoha Kamauoha, vice president; Miss Maggie Hooper, treasurer; Miss Sarah Kamauoha, secretary; Mrs. Lydia Kekuewa, vice secretary; Mrs. Kaai, auditor; and Mrs. Emily Haae,  committee of the whole [? komite nui].

After the election of the officers was over, all the members of the many associations stood along with the new members of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five, and the new members were adorned with paper lei, and at that time the members of Chapter Three of Hilo sang the song “Ka Lei o Kaahumanu.”

When that truly lovely song was being sung, the members were filled with awe and tears welled up in some, and the two mothers who established this junior Kaahumanu society felt that this was perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring initiations seen;  and after the song was over, the new association was blessed with a prayer by the brother of the Ahahui Kaahumanu, Rev. S. J. Desha of the Church of Haili, the one who is a great help to the efforts of the mothers of this association.

The money donated for the treasury of this new association was 27.75.

The sisters of the Kaahumanu committees who arrived and participated in the activities were these below:

Mrs. Hattie Hapai, the honorary president of the association of Hilo; Mrs. Alai Akana, president of the Association of Hilo; Mrs. Beke Keliikahi, secretary of Hilo; Mrs. Sarah Kaiwi, Mrs. Mary Kahenui, Mrs. Elena Mahaiula, Mrs. Helela, and Miss Kaimi Mahaiula, member of Hilo; Mrs. Emma Laeha, president of the association of Laupahoehoe, Mrs. Kealalaina Ne, from the association of Kohala, as well as Mr. Annie Hussey. Mrs. Becky Kawai and Mrs. Eliza Maguire from the association of Waimea, Mrs. Esther K. Haina, secretary of the association of Hamakua; Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana, Mrs. Haili Timoteo and Mrs. Bessie Kopa, from the parent association of Honolulu.

There were letters from Mrs. Aima Nawahi and Mrs. J. Saffery, the president of the Kaahumanu Society of Hamakua, expressing to their sisters of their aloha and of their support for this endeavor.

As for the two of us, the mothers who came to endorse this endeavor, we extend our unending thanks to the officers and members of the Evangelical association of the Island of Hawaii for their generosity in allowing us time to carry out our work for which we travelled over the ocean.

We also give our appreciation to the good kamaaina, Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Kamauoha, for their very kind hospitality in their comfortable home; and the head of the Church, Rev. E. S. Timoteo and his amiable wife, and we extend our thanks to the members of all the associations which joined in to help us for the good of the junior association of the calm of Kona. We also thank the brother of the Kaahumanu members, Rev. S. L. Desha, for his great assistance, as well as to our good sister: Mrs. Aima Nawahi for her assistance in planning to move the endeavor forward; and we also extend our thoughts of aloha and unending blessings to our kind kamaaina who lent her car to take us to where our duties took us, that being Mrs. Kelalaina Robikana of Honolulu.

We pray to our Heavenly Father to give great blessings upon us all; and we hope that with the assistance of benevolent God that you younger sisters of Kaahumanu Society Chapter Five  will move forward, and your works will progress, and may the sisterly love amongst us all last forever.

The two of us,

Lucy K. Peabody, president of the Kaahumanu Society Chapter 1.

Lahilahi Webb, Secretary.

March 31, 1913.

(Kuokoa, 4/11/1913, p. 2)

KU KA AHAHUI KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LI, Helu 14, Aoao 2. Aperila 11, 1913.

Kaahumanu Society elects new officers, 1922.

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE KAAHUMANU SOCIETY.

At three in the afternoon on Wednesday of last week, the Ahahui Kaahumanu held its seventeenth annual meeting at the usual place, to elect the new officers of the association, and to listen to the annual report of the officers.

During the year, there were twelve members who left this life; nine members were each paid for by the society for their burials, and three members who died left benefits after they left this life to the society. The expenses for those members who died reached a total of $665.

The expenses to assist ailing members of the society reached $479.30; according to the many testimonies, the society is progressing well.

There were twelve new members included into the society on that day, and their names are below:

Jennie Kapahu Wilson, Mrs. Bernice Kaehanaoleokalani Kaaiakawaha Spitz, Mrs. Stella Kalikokalani Hanohano, Miss Miriam Kahakuhaakoi Kinney, Annie Paahana Laipila, Mrs. Elizabeth Holoaumoku Gittel, Miss Erna Holoaumoku Gittel, Mrs. Elizabeth Keliinoi Kinolahilahi Bayless, Mrs. Molly Kameeaulani Kapuaokekau Cummings, Miss Mary Kahale Cummings, Miss Haumealani Sheldon, Mrs. Elizabeth Kalaulaokalani Mitchell.

The society was thrilled at the joining of the young members, because the time will come that they will the place of the old members to move the endeavors of the society forward.

The old officers were reelected at this annual meeting; some of the officers held on to each of their positions for the past seventeen years. Here are the names of the officers who were reelected:

Miss Lucy Kamalalehua Kaheiheimalie Peabody, president [peresidena]; Mrs. Helen Kaukuikamokuikekapuokanehunamoku Kamaiopili, vice president [hope peresidena]; Mrs. Elizabeth Lahilahi Napuaikaumakani Webb, secretary [kakauolelo]; Mrs. Lilia Kahuakaiulaakanani Aholo, assistant secretary [kokua kakauolelo]; Mrs. Esther Kailihao Wilson Kelle, treasurer [puuku]; Mrs. Ellen Hooipoinalanielua Dwight, auditor [lunahooia].

Miss Mary Kanailani Sylva, committe to look after the ailing members of the society.

The member of the executive committe [papa hooko]: Mrs. Irene Ii Haalou Kahalelaukoa Holloway, Mrs. Louise Iehu Hapai Ahrens, Mrs. Caroline Kapuaianahulu Robinson, Mrs. Aha Kawehiokalani Ayau, Mrs. Elizabeth Nalehua Kukalia Kahookano, Mrs. Julia Paakonia Kahanamoku, Mrs. Mary Nanea Luana Simeson, Mrs. Caroline Ke Kaua Kuamoo Wallace. Henry Smith, pastor [kahu].

After the meeting was adjourned, there was light refreshments to satisfy all who gathered at the meeting.

(Kuokoa, 6/22/1922, p. 7)

KA HALAWAI MAKAHIKI A KA AHAHUI KAAHUMANU.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 25, Aoao 7. Iune 22, 1922.