Hana mourns the death of the Queen, 1917.

QUEEN’S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

News From Maui Tells of Services at Which Respect is Paid to the Dead

(Special Star-Bulletin Correspondence.)

HANA, Maui, Nov. 23.—In all the islands there is no place more intensely loyal to the noble traditions of the Hawaiian race than in Hana. A queen of Kamehameha I was born at Hana. Queen Kaahumanu was born in a cave on Kauiki Head. Royalty often visited at the home of her parents.

At Wananalua church on Sunday morning a large and representative audience gathered to pay the last honors to the late Queen Liliuokalani. The ancient Hawaiian building was very attractively decorated with flags, royal palms and many beautiful flowers.

William Lennox of the Hana store very kindly loaned his valuable and beautiful collection of royal Hawaiian and other flags. “Old Glory” was there floating over all.

The music and all parts of the service were especially appropriate. The sermon of the morning in English and Hawaiian was upon the text Acts 16:14, Lydia the God Queen. Representative citizens of the Hana district spoke. William P. Haia, Mr. George P. Kauimakaole, Rev. Mr. Mitchell and P. Kamohe called to mind the many virtues of the queen. Mr. Kemohe is the oldest Hawaiian in all this section.

Hana “did itself proud.” The occasion was a notable one and the Wananalua church arose to the opportunity. The day and the celebration will not be forgotten in many years.

(Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 11/24/1917, p. 37)

QUEEN'S DEATH WIDELY MOURNED AROUND ISLANDS

Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Volume XXV, Number 7993, Page 37. November 24, 1917.

James A. E. Kinney and his ohana, 1943.

At Sea

The picture above is of James A. E. Kinney, the son of K. W. Kinney of Hana, Maui, and one of the writers to Ka Hoku o Hawaii. It is believed that A. E. Kinney is at Sea with the Air Force, doing air surveillance [kilo ea]. He graduated from the air surveillance school in Grand Rapids, Michigan this past April and returned to his post at West Palm Beach, Florida, and thereafter it was decided to send him to sea.

A Hawaiian Youth

James Apollo Everett Kinney was born of the loins of Mr. K. W. [Kihapiilani William] and Mrs. Sarah Kaleo Kinney, at the McBryde Sugar Plantation in Kauai, when his father was working burning cane, and he was 32 years old. Continue reading