A. A. Montano pictures of Kilauea! 1881.

[Found under: “ISLAND LOCALS.: About Town.”]

We have on our table a very fine set of photos of Kilauea Volcano, and some distant views of the lava flow, as well as some of the pahoehoe, taken by Montano. Truly our photographers are adventurous. Mr. Montano has certainly struck out a bold line in taking Kilauea.

[This is something I would like to see. Anybody know of any?]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 8/31/1881, p. 3)

HawaiianGazette_8_31_1881_3

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XVII, Number 35, Page 3. August 31, 1881.

All kinds of random things in the local news column, 1866.

LOCAL  NEWS.

The number of whaling ships docked in the harbor by our count yesterday reached a total of 30.

Some haole people went touring aboard the warship Vanderbilt on this past Tuesday and Wednesday.

We saw a number of new Pianos in the Shop of Melchers & Co. being for sale to those who want them.

Queen Emalani returned to the premises of her mother, that being the estate of Dr. Rooke [Kauka Ruka]. She is there where she is finding comfort and it is there that she is finding relaxation.

Habor Dredger.—The Kaulu is performing its duties in digging up the mud from our harbor. But it is now seaside of Ainahou where it is cleaning. Continue reading

Nene being cared for by Herbert Shipman, etc. 1941.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Meahou o Hamakua Ame Kohala” by Mrs. Reinhardt.]

Last week, two men living and working at the Kilauea National Park came to Honokaa School, their names being Gunther Olsen and friend. The school was filled with its 496 students from 1st grade to 6th, to see pictures of the mountains of this island. Olsen described the different birds while his companion showed pictures of the birds on a white cloth. Truly beautiful were the pictures of the mamo, O-o, Elepaio, Iiwi, Apapane, and so forth. The names of the birds of ours were clearly pronounced in Hawaii by that man.

According what was said by this man, in Keaau is being cared for at the home of Herbert Shipman, NENE birds, which are believed to be going extinct, but they are increasing. Our birds were much more beautiful in the olden days before other birds were imported from all over, the birds that are a problem for the crops growing in our gardens. They eat flowers of the peppers [nioi], and that is why the nioi doesn’t fruit as they did in years past.

After the pictures of the birds were shown, pictures were shown of the burning fires of Pele atop Mokuaweoweo last year. These men climbed up Mokuaweoweo on horseback and when they reached a certain point, the horses were left and they went on foot until the crater. Where they were was scorching. While the fires were boiling, snow was seen on both sides covering the ground. Continue reading

Explosive eruption, 1924.

The Deeds of Madame Pele, the Woman of the Pit, are Mystical.

Many Lives Were Spared from the Volcanic Rocks.

Rocks and Ash were Spewed into the Air When the Volcanic Explosion Occurred Last Tuesday

Hilo, May 13.—Many lives were spared this evening, because of the foreseeing of trouble by Thomas E. Boles, the superintendent of the national parks [paka lahui] of Hawaii, and by him preventing people from going to see the volcanic crater of Halemaumau a few minutes before the strong volcanic explosion, sending large rocks to a distance of 2000 feet. Volcanic ash was spewed 1800 [feet] in the air above the crater. Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, part 3, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Meeting with Kolomu’o and Pahinahina.

When the woman left that place at the seaside of Kaelehuluhulu, she arrived in the uplands of Keoneeli, a place that is renown to this day called Kepuhiapele [‘the scorching of Pele’], a heap of aa lava that is almost 200 Feet high, downside of the place where J. A. MaGuire [known also as Keoni Kaimana] is living.

When the woman arrived there, there were two girls named Kolomu’o and Pahinahina broiling breadfruit, while the parents were away farming. This was a huge town during those days, with many people living there. When the woman met up with the girls broiling ulu. The woman said, “The ulu that you are cooking is done.” One of the girls responded, “We are cooking ulu, but it is not totally done.”

The woman went on, “When you ulu is cooked, who will partake of it first?” “La’i, my god, will eat first.” “So La’i is a powerful akua?” “Yes, La’i is powerful.” The name of this girl was Kolomu’o, and the area beneath that scorching of Pele is famous to this day and called Kolomu’o, and famous too is the Opelu fishing shrine [Ko’a] at the beach of Kaupulehu.

Then the woman asked the other girl, Pahinahina, “And when your ulu is done, who is it for?” “It is for Pele Honuamea, my god.” “Then it is our ulu; your ulu is cooked, let the two of us partake in it.” Pahinahina agreed, and the ulu was peeled [makikoe²] and eaten up. Continue reading

Paaiea Pond, from the pen of J. W. H. Isaac Kihe, 1914.

SOME STORIED LANDS OF KONA

Written for the Hoku o Hawaii by ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu¹

PAAIEA POND

Paaiea was a great pond almost like the ponds of Wainanalii and Kiholo. In the olden days, when the great ruling chiefs were living, and when these fish ponds were full of the riches of Awa, Anae, and Ahole, along with all sorts of fish which swam within.

During that time, Konohiki were stationed, and he was the guard of the pond that watched over the pond and all things, as here we are talking about Paaiea Pond which was destroyed by lava and became pahoehoe lava which remains today, which is what the writer is introducing to the readers of the Hoku o Hawaii.

In the correct and trues story of this pond, its boundaries began from Kaelehuluhulu on the north and on the south was at the place called Wawaloli, and the distance from one end to the other was 3 miles or more, and that was the length of this pond; and today within these boundaries, there are a number of pools [lua wai loko] remaining during this time that the writer is speaking before the readers of the Hoku.

The great Overseer [Konohiki] who cared for this pond was Kepaalani, and everything fell under him: the storehouses [hale papaa] where poi and fish were stored, the halau for the fishing canoes, the nets and all thing, and from him the fishermen and the retainers of the court would obtain their sustenance.

And at this time when the pond was destroyed by lava, Kamehameha was residing in Hilo for the purpose of waging war, and this war was called Kaipalaoa; during this war, Namakehaikalani died and was offered atop the Heiau of Piihonua in Hilo; and this was Kamehameha’s final war, and his enemies lived quietly without uprising once again. This was the time between 1798 until 1801, and it is said that this is when lava destroyed this pond that was full of riches, and turned it into a land of pahoehoe lava which remains to this day. Continue reading

Alika, South Kona, 1886.

The story of how Alika was named.

Alika was a man and Hina was his wahine, and their occupation was farming. Before they would begin farming, they would vow that should their crops mature, they would consume it along with Pele, the god. But when the crops reached maturity, the two of them didn’t carry out their promise, and the day that they ate of their crops, that was when they soon died.

This is how it happened: Hina urged Alika to eat sweet potato, and so Alika went to dig up some, and after finding some, he baked it in the umu¹ until done and then they ate it all; then the forest began to speak as if it were a man, echoing all about them. During which time, the man soon thought of their vow. Alika said to Hina, “We will die because of you,” and before he was done speaking, lava soon flamed forth and they perished.

And it is for this man that this land is called by that name until this day; if you look at the aftermath of the lava, in this area, the burnt homes of Kaupo stand jagged because of the spreading flames²; the land is horrid in appearance in every way; but the kamaaina love it here, and it is only the malihini who disparage it.

Pohakuekaha was the aikane of Alika and Ko-aka; Kiapea was the woman of all of them; they died and their bodies transformed into rocks; Pohakuekaha is a stone that is visited often by malihini who are in the area.

The amazing thing about this rock is that if the visitor climbs atop of the rock and throws pebbles into the sea, the sea will turn rough, but not in any other area, just right there.

As for Ko-aka, if the sea is calm right above it, during low tide, this is a sign that will be rough seas; this rock is now located in down in the deep, while Pohakuekaha is on the sand.

These things above deal with the story of this land as was heard by Kahinalua, the kamaaina of this place.

Yours truly,

M. K. KIAMOKU

Alika, S. Kona, Hawaii.

¹Umu is another word for imu, the underground oven (as in the name, Kaumualii).

²I am not sure if this is a reference to the actual place called Kaupo in South Kona, or to the famous saying “Kū ke ʻā i ka hale o Kaupō” from the story of Pāmano…

(Kuokoa, 8/7/1886, p. 3)

Ka moolelo i loaa ai ka inoa Alika.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 32, Aoao 3. Augate 7, 1886.

Another Antiques Roadshow find? 1868.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS: Oahu”]

Painting of Lava.—On the morning of this past Wednesday, placed outside the Bookstore of Whitney was a painting of a river of lava flowing and entering the sea of Kahioipakini [ka Hioipakini] in Kau, done by H. M. Whitney and sent here to Honolulu. A copy of that was painted by Joseph Nawahi [Iosepa Nawahi], (Kahooluhi), and it is placed at the entrance of our business office to show to the public. There have been many hundreds of men, women, and children who have come in droves to see it starting on that day. The people were filled with fright and fear at this frightful representation of the deeds of Almighty God. Seen are four volcanic cones ablaze upland of the house of Captain Brown in Kahuku.

(Kuokoa 4/18/1868, p. 3)

Ke kii o ke Ahi Pele.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 16, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1868.

Tragic and frightening Pele in action, 1868.

Latest News!

LAVA ERUPTED SEASIDE of KAHIOIPAKINI!

77 PEOPLE PERISHED TERRIFYINGLY!

THERE WAS MUCH LOSS IN PROPERTY!

SOME 1000s OF ANIMALS DIE!

3000 OR MORE TREMORS SHAKE KAU!

THE LATEST WORD FROM KAU!

Through the kindness of our loving friend, the Honorable W. T. Martin of Kau, the one who came from where the Fiery lava is wreaking havoc, we have obtained the information below, and we put before our readers the things he witnessed with his eyes, and heard with his ears:

According to the native son of Naihe of Kau, a river of lava is flowing from Maunaloa until the sea at Kahioipakini [Ka Hioipakini], and so the people of Kona cannot set foot in Kau and so too for Kau’s people to Kona.

Five craters of lava opened up at Puuolokuana, right in the middle of the land between the sea and the Mountain.

The height that the fire is shooting up from those craters of lava is five hundred feet or more. From the plumes headed upland and down; and from the rivers of lava from Puuolokuana to the shore and entering the sea; flashes were seen like lightning in the dark, reddish-gray, green, and white clouds. Also heard booming louder than cannon.

When the lava exited to the sea, a large heap of sand appeared in the water, creeping along, being pushed forward to the side going to Kona. The lava is creating new hills, and perhaps there will be many hereafter.

A frightening rumbling was heard beneath Waiohinu and the neighboring areas when the lava was flowing. This rumbling was still going on at the time the Kona Packet [Kona Pakeke] recently left Kau.

Before the lava appeared in Puuolokuana on the evening of the 7th of April, volcanic ash had already covered the houses from Kahuku all the way to Ninole, on the night of the 6th. The kamaaina and the haole were alarmed then, thinking that this was the end, because of the explanation of a knowledgeable haole.

The great stone church standing in Waiohinu was driven to the ground, and there was not one stone left upon another; so too of all the stone buildings around that area. The wooden structures were all smashed and were pushed to the Kona side from where they first stood. From Puaao until the sea of Waikapuna, the land was cracked open on the 2nd of April, by a powerful earthquake that was seen by all of us around the area, and the quake did not subside to the moment when the ship left. A few days prior to the eruption, the fissure closed up, but where it came together did not match up as before; it is uneven.

The settlements at Kaalualu, Paiahaa, Honuapo, Hokukano, Kaalaiki, the two Hilea, Ninole, Wailau, Punaluu, all the way to the sea of Keauhou: all of those houses were lost to the sea, “by the onslaught of the great seas of the woman of the pit.”

The kind of sea that struck the settlements above, it was ocean water joined with water coming up from the ground. The height that the ocean reached was like the height of the coconut trees near the homes. These waters were not like the ocean seen on our other islands; it was terribly unusual. If it was a tsunami [kai hooee], then there would be no human toll, but what came ashore was a swirling sea [kai owili].

There is volcanic ash in the wind, which was seen at Keaiwa during the time spoken of above (Apr. 2). The area covered by ash is nearly three-forth mile in length. And under the area covered over by ash is a river of water. As the wind stretches out, the sea cliffs of Kamehame and Mahuka were swept. Soon after, is when the water appeared, devastating those spoken of in the settlements above.

It is estimated that the number of cows covered over by the eruption [luai pele] at Kapaliuka was no less than five hundred, and the goats were no less than two thousand.

The number of animals killed by the lava in Kahuku and the two Pakini, all the way to Kamaoa, is thought to be no less than one thousand cows and horses. As for the goats and sheep, their number is unknown.

The lands which turned into pahoehoe, partially engulfed by lava, was the lands of Robert Brown [Rabati Baraunu], W. T. Martin, Kamamalu, W. C. Lunalilo, government land, and lands of other kamaaina people, lying outstretched from Kahuku to Puueo. These were all fertile lands.

It is guessed that the damages of all lands destroyed by lava included with property, is no less than seventy-thousand dollars ($70,000) should it be properly  tallied. The earthquake began in Kau from the last days of March until the 10th of April; it is believed that there were three thousand quakes that shook. Some were powerful while others were weak, but there was one that was the biggest, that being the quake of the 2nd of April, from which the many below perished.

We put forward the list of those who died as spoken of above.

Perished in the Eruption at Kapaliuka, Kau, Hawaii.

Kanakaole (m.), Kailo (m.), Puoina (m.), Kalamahiai (m.), Kahuhu (m.), Kuaehu (m.), Kaawa (m.), Kuaki (m.), Pupule (m.), Kaili (m.), Kaaihue (m.), Kuikahi (m.), Kahuhu (m.), Kamaliiwahine (f.), Kalakala (f.), Mireta (f.), Mere (f.), Kekahuna (f.), Kauinui (f.), Haolelo (f.), Kumaiea (f.), Aulani (f.), Kaaiwaiwai (f.), Kahikina (f.), Kikalaole (f.), Keliinohola (f.), Honuakaha (f.), Keahiwela (f.), Waimaka (f.), Luukia (f.), Kamaka (f.).

Died at sea at Makaka & Moaula.

Kliinui [Keliinui] (m.), Awihi (m.), Ahia (m.), Kamalii (m.), Kahamo (m.), Nakamaa (m.), Kalua (m.), Keliimakawela (m.), Halelaau (f.), Kahaipo (f.), Kapuni (f.), Kapela (f.).

From Punaluu was Kalawaialiiliii (f.)

From Ninole was Kapuuhonua (m.), Hanoa (m.), Kamoka (f.).

From Kawa was Nailieha (m.), Keahialoa (m.).

From Honuapo was Keaweaheulu (m.), Haole (f.), Moeawa (m.), Moehuliole (f.), Kaumuahana (f.), Piimoku (f.), Kukona (m.), Kaina (m.), Kaumu (f.), Kiniakua (f.), Kalaiku (m.), Palapala (f.), Kailipeleuli (f.), Kauha (f.), Puhiea (m.), Moku (m.), Mahoe (m.), Keliikipi (f.), Naholoaa (f.), Kamaliikane (m.), Pupuka (f.), Apua (m.).

Died at sea at Kaalualu & Paiahaa.

Kapela (f.), Kahinakea (f.).

Surrounded by the Eruption of Kahuku.

Pau (m.), Mauae (m.), Hueu (m.), Pauwahine (m.).

People who barely survived the tsunami from Punaluu to Paiahaa in Kau, Hawaii, numbered twenty three (23), other than those who died met with disaster in Keauhou, who are not counted here. Here are those that are living atop the hills:—Puu o Haao, Kahilipaliuka, about 400 or so; in the lands of Hilea & Kaala, 80 or more; and the majority fled to Hilo & Kona. The people of Waiohinu and the devastated areas, are gathered on the hill of Haao; it is there that they sleep, but perhaps a fraction has returned back to their own place. They will probably be facing difficulty from lack of food. The farms from Pakini until the sea of Kamaoa are covered over.

(Kuokoa, 4/18/1868, p. 2)

Nu Hou Hope Loa!

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 16, Aoao 2. Aperila 18, 1868.

Sun blocked out, 1868.

[Found under: “LOCAL NEWS: Oahu”]

Sun Blocked by Smoke.—Last week, the sun was totally covered over by the smoke blown from the volcano of Kau on Hawaii, and the sun appeared red. On Monday, the Kona winds blew in the evening, and much heavy rains fell in Honolulu nei. On Tuesday evening, it turned into strong winds which are still blowing now.

(Kuokoa, 4/18/1868, p. 3)

Paa ka La i ka uahi.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke VII, Helu 16, Aoao 3. Aperila 18, 1868.