Laieikawai published as a book, 1863.

NEW HAWAIIAN BOOK!

E PLURIBUS UNUM.

LAIEIKAWAI!

THE

Precious One of Paliuli

The Woman of the Twilight. Continue reading

Opening of S. N. Haleole’s telling of the story of Laieikawai, 1862.

THE STORY

OF

LAIEIKAWAI.

INTRODUCTION.

{Pertaining to Laieikawai.—The Moolelo Kaao was held by the one publishing this story in his Book of Moolelo for eighteen years and three months, beginning in the month of August, 1844. And the one with the Book of Moolelo comes Kailiokalauokekoa. But it is not only these stories in the Book of Moolelo; the moolelo of Painahala as well, has been preserved in the month of October, 1847. The length of this story is like the story whose title appears in this introduction; being that Laieikawai is 375 pages and Painahala is 363; but the telling of Painahala is almost the same as Keamalu, except the grandmother is different. Continue reading

All kinds of random things in the local news column, 1866.

LOCAL  NEWS.

The number of whaling ships docked in the harbor by our count yesterday reached a total of 30.

Some haole people went touring aboard the warship Vanderbilt on this past Tuesday and Wednesday.

We saw a number of new Pianos in the Shop of Melchers & Co. being for sale to those who want them.

Queen Emalani returned to the premises of her mother, that being the estate of Dr. Rooke [Kauka Ruka]. She is there where she is finding comfort and it is there that she is finding relaxation.

Habor Dredger.—The Kaulu is performing its duties in digging up the mud from our harbor. But it is now seaside of Ainahou where it is cleaning. Continue reading

Kawelo story, 1909 / 2009.

The Great Story

OF

KAWELO

The Foremost and the Powerful, the One Who Put
Down the Strength of Kauahoa, the Youthful Hero of Hanalei;

TO WHOM BELONGED THE FAMOUS CLUB KUIKAA,
AND HIS WAS THE TRIPPING CLUB-WIELDING WIFE,
KANEWAHINEIKIAOHA

The writer of this Moolelo gives first his New Year Aloha to the friends and companions of the Pride of the Nation [Ke Kuokoa Home Rula], before putting before them a short explanation about things pertaining to this story. Continue reading

More on traditional stories, and variation within, 1862.

About Kaao and Moolelo.

O Readers of kaao, we have seen the story of Kailiokalauokekoa that was published by S. Hinau, and it was just completed with the 5th installment [this series, “He Moolelo no Kailiokalauokekoa,” probably started on 10/24/1861 (which is missing) and S. Hinau closes his telling on 12/5/1861]; S. N. Haleole has just started that story again [which begins with genealogy, on 12/12/1861, restarts with installment 6 on 12/19/1861, and probably ended with installment 10, on 1/30/1862 (which sadly is also missing)], and with that retelling of the story, there has been quite the uproar. Those who are with Hinau say that his is correct, and those that read Hinau’s first fault Haleole’s publishing of Kailiokalauokekoa, as if there is but one person who retained this story on this solid earth. The actions of these people are unbelievable.

Those people go on and on saying, “oh please! this series is so misguided and not like Hinau’s”; further more, “Who has heard those oli which were chanted by Kailiokalauokekoa? and who kept those mele?” Auwe! Is there only one school where it was taught? Is it only Hinau who has kept this story? No, there are many people today. So stop with your unfounded ideas.

(Hoku o ka Pakipika, 1/16/1862)

No na Kaao a me na Moolelo.

Ka Hoku o ka Pakipika, Buke 1, Helu 17, Aoao 4. Ianuari 16, 1862.