Eruption 150 years ago, 1868.

THE ERUPTION!

Up to Wednesday, 29th ult., there has been no further accounts of volcanic action on Hawaii. The earthquakes have ceased in violence and frequency, although the whole islands is still moved by slight vibrations. There was a smart shock felt in Kohala on Thursday, also the same day, a slight vibration here in Honolulu.

There are reports that the lava has again broken out in Kapapala, but we do not credit it.

We are happy to give our readers a clear and intelligent account of the late volcanic action on Hawaii, from the pen of the Hon. William Hillebrand, M. D., who has just returned from a close examination of the disturbed districts.

The account of the lava fissure at Kahuku, is entirely new to the public. H. I. M.’s Commissioner and Consul, M. Beranger, who made the tour with Dr. Hillebrand, has made a number of sketches of the most interesting volcanic appearances. Continue reading

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Nene being cared for by Herbert Shipman, etc. 1941.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Meahou o Hamakua Ame Kohala” by Mrs. Reinhardt.]

Last week, two men living and working at the Kilauea National Park came to Honokaa School, their names being Gunther Olsen and friend. The school was filled with its 496 students from 1st grade to 6th, to see pictures of the mountains of this island. Olsen described the different birds while his companion showed pictures of the birds on a white cloth. Truly beautiful were the pictures of the mamo, O-o, Elepaio, Iiwi, Apapane, and so forth. The names of the birds of ours were clearly pronounced in Hawaii by that man.

According what was said by this man, in Keaau is being cared for at the home of Herbert Shipman, NENE birds, which are believed to be going extinct, but they are increasing. Our birds were much more beautiful in the olden days before other birds were imported from all over, the birds that are a problem for the crops growing in our gardens. They eat flowers of the peppers [nioi], and that is why the nioi doesn’t fruit as they did in years past.

After the pictures of the birds were shown, pictures were shown of the burning fires of Pele atop Mokuaweoweo last year. These men climbed up Mokuaweoweo on horseback and when they reached a certain point, the horses were left and they went on foot until the crater. Where they were was scorching. While the fires were boiling, snow was seen on both sides covering the ground. Continue reading

Pele makes appearance atop Mokuaweoweo, 1914.

FIRES BURN ABOVE MOKUAWEOWEO

On the evening of Wednesday the burning of lava above the crater of Mokuaweoweo was clearly known. At the arrival of the steamship Mauna Kea in the port of Awapaakai on Maui, on the Wednesday eve, the glow of fire atop Mauna Loa was witnessed by her passengers, and the fires above the Mountain was soon learned. These past days, word of the very intense fires above Mauna Loa has arrived, yet it did not pour over the side of the Mountain. However it was clear to the folks of Kawaihae and North and South Kona the power of the spouting of the fires above, and in the estimation of some people, the strength of the lava shooting above the crater was perhaps several hundred feet. The skies on the Kona side was illuminated, and it is being watched for where the lava will erupt from the mountain as is usual when eruptions occur atop Mokuaweoweo. Some people think that the strongest eruption will occur on the Kona side of the crater, and some predict that the flow will indeed happen on the Kona side. But the return of the person watching for the lava flow of Kilauea is awaited for being that he is now atop Mauna Loa.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/3/1914, p. 2)

 

OWELA KE AHI ILUNA O MOKUAWEOWEO

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 9, Helu 26, Aoao 2. Decemaba 3, 1914.

Lava destroys the village of Hoopuloa, Kona. 1926.

The Harbor of Hoopuloa is Destroyed by Lava.

On this past Sunday [4/18/1926], the fire of woman of Mokuaweoweo appeared and reached the sea and it swept aside the things blocking its path. When it got close to the upland of Hoopuloa, the flow of lava separated into two, and one of the flows went straight for the village of Hoopuloa and the harbor, and the second flow went towards the village of Milolii. The fiery lava engulfed the harbor and village of Hoopuloa, and now they are but a heap of pahoehoe lava.

According to eyewitnesses of this engulfing lava, it was frightening seeing the lava coming down, and others say that it was truly awesome watching the flowing lava and its sweeping aside of all obstructions in its path.

The last word heard before the the Hoku went to the press was that this Wondrous Woman of Halemaumau returned to her Palace at Kilauea, and she is bringing to life her fires at the famed crater of Halemaumau.

Perhaps her rage has been quenched as the skin of that woman has touched the sea, but the memory of the tragedy which befell the people of that section of Kona is heartbreaking.

[And check out this awesome picture of the tragic event taken by Tai Sing Loo, put up by the Hawaiian Historical Society!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 4/20/1926, p. 2)

Pau ka Uwapo o Hoopuloa i ke Ahi Pele

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XIX, Helu 48, Aoao 2. Aperila 20, 1926.