Hawaiian birds and the law, 1865.

ANNOUNCEMENT.

KNOW YOU ALL BY THIS Announcement; prohibited totally is the catching and the killing of Oo and Mamo birds living on the personal lands of King Kamehameha V, and from this day forward, no Oo is to be injured or killed on the lands of the Monarch; not by using lime [ke kapili kepau ana], not by snaring [ka ahele puka kaula], not by shooting [ke ki pu ana]; it is totally kapu. The person or persons who go against the words above, they each can be prosecuted.

R. KEELIKOLANI,

Governor of Hawaii.

Hilo, Hawaii, August 1, 1865.

[Might any of you law people know if there were any Kingdom laws on the books that outlawed the catching or killing of native birds? I have seen laws prohibiting the killing of non-native birds, but not native birds.]

(Au Okoa, 9/4/1865, p. 4)

OLELO HOOLAHA.

Ke Au Okoa, Buke I, Helu 20, Aoao 4. Sepatemaba 4, 1865.

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Select committee to decide whether to protect birds, 1876.

[Found under: “Ke Kau Ahaolelo o M. H. 1876: La Hana 88—Poakolu, Augate 16.”]

Order of the Day.

The bill to protect the oo, iiwi, mamo, and akakane birds for the king, so that they are not killed, was read for the third time. It was left to the select committee [komite wae], Kaai, Aholo, Kahanu, Nahaku, and Wana.

[This is found in the minutes of the 1876 Session of the Legislature.]

(Kuokoa, 9/2/1876, p. 1)

Na Hana o ka La.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XV, Helu 36, Aoao 1. Sepatemaba 2, 1876.

Nene being cared for by Herbert Shipman, etc. 1941.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Meahou o Hamakua Ame Kohala” by Mrs. Reinhardt.]

Last week, two men living and working at the Kilauea National Park came to Honokaa School, their names being Gunther Olsen and friend. The school was filled with its 496 students from 1st grade to 6th, to see pictures of the mountains of this island. Olsen described the different birds while his companion showed pictures of the birds on a white cloth. Truly beautiful were the pictures of the mamo, O-o, Elepaio, Iiwi, Apapane, and so forth. The names of the birds of ours were clearly pronounced in Hawaii by that man.

According what was said by this man, in Keaau is being cared for at the home of Herbert Shipman, NENE birds, which are believed to be going extinct, but they are increasing. Our birds were much more beautiful in the olden days before other birds were imported from all over, the birds that are a problem for the crops growing in our gardens. They eat flowers of the peppers [nioi], and that is why the nioi doesn’t fruit as they did in years past.

After the pictures of the birds were shown, pictures were shown of the burning fires of Pele atop Mokuaweoweo last year. These men climbed up Mokuaweoweo on horseback and when they reached a certain point, the horses were left and they went on foot until the crater. Where they were was scorching. While the fires were boiling, snow was seen on both sides covering the ground. Continue reading

The story of Kana, from William Hyde Rice, 1908.

A STORY

ABOUT

KANA, THE ROPE GRANDSON OF ULI

THE EXPERT OF HAWAII, AND THE MYSTERIOUS ONE WHO LOWERED THE FAMOUS PEAK OF HAUPU WHICH REACHED INTO THE HEAVENS—THE ONE WHO ALSO FETCHED THE SUN AT KUKULU O KAHIKI.

Hookaakaa ka Lani
Kakaa ka Iloli
Wehiwehi ka Mauna
Palamoa ka Opua

E Kana—e
Hina ia i o Uli ala
Ko Kupunawahine.
* ∗ * ∗ * ∗

[The Heavens Turn
Rolling are the pangs of pregnancy
Bedecked are the mountains
Dense are the clouds

O Kana
It is Hina and Uli is there
Your Grandmother.
* ∗ * ∗ * ∗]

(By the kindness of Hon. W. H. Rice of the Island Sun-Snatching Island.)

Uli (f) dwelt with Ku (m), born was Hakalani-leo (f), and she was called another name, Kuahuula. Kuahuula (f) dwelt with Haka (m), born was Kukahikapo (m), Halekamakamaole (m), Kuluakapo (m), Kukolukapo (m), Hanalolo (m), Ouwaikaaha (m), Paukukaula (m), Awepumaia (m), Kaeekowali (m), Pinawelewele (m), Niheu (m) and Kana. Uli (f) was born in Hilo, Hawaii, and she had a number of siblings. Manu (m) is from below in Milu, and Wakea (m) is from below in Papanuihanaumoku. They were high chiefs. Uli’s work was planting all growing things and making kapa. Continue reading