On Pele’s departure from Kahiki, 1906.

[Found under: “He Moolelo no Hiiakaikapoli-o-Pele.]

KAU HELU UMI-KUMAMAKAHI A HIIAKA.

1. Mai Kahiki ka wahine o Pele
2. Mai ka aina i Polapola
3. Mai ka punohu a Kane
4. Mai ke ao lalapa i ka lani
5. Mai ka opu la i Kahiki
6. Lapuka i Hawaii ka wahine o Pele
7. Kalai ka waa o Honuaiakea
8. Ko waa o Kamohoalii
9. Hoa mai ka moku a paa
10. Ua oki ka waa o ke akua
11. Ka waa o Kalaihonuamea
12. Holo mai ke au aeae Pele
13. Aeae ka lani, ai puni ka moku
14. Aeae kini o ke akua
15. Ia wai ka uli, ka hope o ka waa?
16. Ia Kamohoalii
17. Ia Ehu-a-menehune Continue reading

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More from Evelyn Desha and Steven Desha Jr., 1944.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS [of Kona]

Kealakekua, Monday, May 1, 1944. At Mokuaekaua [Mokuaikaua], Kailua, was where our prayer was yesterday, and it was carried out as usual. The Holy Communion [ahaaina a ka Haku] was carried out with great reverence. There were some malihini as well who came to this worship. Continue reading

More Hokulea past, 1975.

Keaulana: ‘It was beautiful.’

First cruise proves craft a humdinger

By BUNKY BAKUTIS
Advertiser Staff Writer

After the dust had settled from the day’s ceremony and the crew relaxed around beer coolers and luau food, Buffalo Keaulana, one of the two steersmen for the sailing canoe’s maiden voyage, summed up the brief cruise: “It was beautiful.

“It (the canoe) turned real easy. And when the paddling was right and the canoe was moving, it was a breeze to handle,” said Keaulana, who has been practicing sailing a smaller version of the double-hulled canoe this past year in preparation for the Tahiti trip.

SOME OF THE PADDLERS for yesterday’s ceremonial cruise into Kaneohe Bay also sung the craft’s praises. Continue reading

Early days of the Hokulea, 1975.

Canoes blessed, voyaging society tests the water

By BRUCE BENSON
Advertiser Science Writer

At least a thousand people sat silent on the beach yesterday, watching a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual not seen since the days of Kamehameha.

Then with hoots and hollers from the crowd, a hundred hands tugged on the lines to send a spanking-new double-hulled canoe down the ways and into Kaneohe Bay. After some two years of dreaming, the Polynesian Voyaging Society was afloat.

The society is a nonprofit group made up of everyone from just average folks to highly skilled artisans and scientists and they are all pursuing the same goal:

To attempt to send the 6–foot canoe launched yesterday to Tahiti and back next summer, using the methods and tools of the Polynesians who first sailed to Hawaii more than a thousand years ago. Continue reading

Hokulea! 1975

Photo by Robert B. Goodman for Polynesian Voyaging Society

Not since Kamehameha…

The place is Kaneohe Bay; the date, 1975. But not since the days of Kamehameha has such a Polynesian canoe-blessing ritual been seen in Hawaii. The occasion was yesterday’s launching of a double-hulled craft which the Polynesian Voyaging Society will attempt to sail to Tahiti and back next summer. For more pictures and the story, see Hawaii Report on Page A-3.

(Star-Bulletin & Advertiser, 5/9/1975, p. 1)

Star&Advertiser_3_9_1975_1.png

Sunday Star-Bulletin and Advertiser, Page A1, March 9, 1975.

 

News out of Lahaina, 1867.

From Lahaina.

Pertaining to the Queen.—Queen Emma has returned from her tour of Wailuku on this past Tuesday evening of May, and it was at 8 o’clock that she reached here in Lahaina. She was accompanied by the distinguished ones of the valley shade [ka malu hekuawa], and she returned with her attendants who went along, His Ex. P. Nahaolelua, Col. D. Kalakaua, Hon. P. Y. Kekuaokalani, Hon. A. M. Kahalewai and Mrs. Kalakaua.

Exhibit of paintings.—This past Thursday night, there was a great exhibit of illustrations at the School of the English Mission; there were many portraits shown that night, all of Hawaii’s Alii; and we admired all of the paintings, and they were done with skill; in attendance as well was the Queen.

A Party.—On the evening of Thursday, Reverend G. Mason held a party to honor the Queen, and those who were instructed, and everything carried out at the party was gracious, and the tables were laden with things of all sorts, and we ate until satiated, and a most was leftover. Continue reading

S. K. Maialoha sent to Kalaupapa, 1905.

LEAVES THE LAND

SEES THE LAND OF SUFFERING AS A STRANGER.

O Swift Messenger of the communities of Hawaii, floating all the way foreign lands, Ke Aloha Aina Newspaper. Greetings:—

On the 12th of this September, in the morning hours, there was crying as people walked outside of the grounds of that hallowed castle, and at 8 o’clock or so was when our belongings were readied. The wailing was heard of women for their husbands, men for their wives, parents for their children, children for their parents, family for family.

And at 11 o’clock, the patients were called to board the car; a veil was spread, and people could no more see us; the cars left the grounds, and great mourning was heard; your writer saw his dear mama and our child for the last time; and the writer heard the calling of my beloved Ape, “O Papa, come back to me.” Continue reading