Reminiscences of Haena,

THE STORIED PLACES OF HAENA

Some years ago, you would go by horse to see the wet caves at Haena. Now, the tourists can go easily and get to these wet caves; you travel on the pali to get to Haena.

Now cars can go and look into one of the waters called by the name Waiakanaloa.

One of these wet caves is above another wet cave; you climb up and get to where you can look down and ?????? the frigid waters like ice.

However before you reach this wet cave mentioned before, you will see a dry cave, and that is Maniniholo.

In previous times of Haena, Kakuai, some sightseers ???? into these wet caves, they boarded canoes and entered and jumped into the cold waters. Some people say that the body of the bathers turn white like snow, and the water is very cold when it touches the skin.

It is not known where the water comes from, but there is water there, it is as if these famous wet caves come up from the earth.

Maniniholo is not a wet cave; you can go in it but it is not like before when people just stood at one place, because dirt has been spread, so some places are stable, and it is filled over with sand from the beach. There are a lot of different things that are being told by those writing about storied places of these areas and the stories of the very old past. You leave these caves and you get to the cliffs where firebrands were thrown in the early days of this land. Leave there and then you see the heiau where Lohiau stayed, and now, in that place is the beautiful home of the Brown brothers [hoahanau Balaunu], the children of Mrs. Irene Kahalelaukoa [Ii] Brown before, but recently Mrs. C. S. Holloway.

That is where you see the stone foundation where Lohiau lived, and there he danced hula [???? hula ???? hele] with Hiiakaikapoliopele after Hiiaka sought to save Lohiau, and after he was revived, they left on their travels to Hawaii Island.

There are many fine things in this area of Haena along with their stories which are being greatly sought after by those writing the history of Hawaii.

[This article continues on, but it gets harder and harder to read. Hopefully the original is clearer so one day we can see what the article actually says!]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/6/1931, p. 2)

HokuoHawaii_1_6_1931_2

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke XXIV, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Ianuari 6, 1931.

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