Memorial Day advertisement, 1907.

Flowers for Memorial Day.

You can find Daisies, Marigolds [Hope Oioi],* Ferns, and many other varieties, for a very reasonable price at the Nursery of S. K. Nakapaahu (Hawaiian Nursery) mauka of Auwaiolimu. Therefore, don’t forget to visit to buy your flowers there for the coming Memorial Day [La Kau Pua].

*Marigolds are usually known by the more common “Okole Oioi”.

(Aloha Aina, 5/25/1907, p. 7)

AlohaAina_5_25_1907_7.png

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XII, Helu 21, Aoao 7. Mei 25, 1907.

Memorial Day past, 1902.

Honoring Alii

In the early morning of this past memorial day [la kau pua], Prince David Kawananakoa and his friends glided quietly up to the grave of our Alii.

As he entered, he placed flowers and beautiful lei upon the coffins there. It is good that he honored them, and we believe this to be aloha for the alii. We are with him in his actions.

[Let us not remember those who we aloha just on this one day of the year…]

(Kuokoa, 6/6/1902, p. 2)

Ka Hoomanao Alii

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XL, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Iune 6, 1902.

Decoration Day, 1909.

“DAY TO STREW FLOWERS”

As has been the custom in previous years, that is the observation of memorial day [la lupua], the town is similarly decorating the graves of their loved ones with flowers of every type, and the cemeteries of the many who have passed are truly beautiful to see.

The 30th of May has been taken as a day to “strew flowers,” being that it is the month in which many flowers are seen, and also it is the final day the soldiers served as soldiers in the great war [kaua huliamahi].

The number of the [national] cemeteries in the different States of the United States, for the soldiers who sacrificed their lives for their land, is about seventy-seven, and within them they hold about four-hundred fifty thousand bodies. It is for them that the day is set aside; it is a time for the living to show their loving remembrances for those who bore suffering for the welfare of the people who enjoy the rights and blessings for which they sought after.

In the year 1882, the parades and speeches for those who died on the battlefields were initiated, and that is what happened this past Monday by the soldiers of this town.

Taking the words of General John B. Gordon, “It is impossible for us who are today joyful, to deny the truth of these things, that being, those who are living should be as true brothers of those people who suffered injuries for the blessings of this land. They stood and fought for the righteousness of the law and for independence, and that is how this generation then should remain and defend the very same right, continually pushing America on higher in all areas of progress.”

(Kuokoa, 6/9/1909, p. 4)

KA LA LUPUA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 23, Aoao 4. Iune 9, 1909.

A day to remember, 1924.

THE “DAY TO PLACE FLOWERS” WAS OBSERVED HERE IN HONOLULU

Just as in years past where Decoration Day [La Kaupua] was observed, so too has it come again on this past Friday, as the graves in the different cemeteries were decorated, and also a parade of soldiers was held upland of the cemetery of Nuuanu, where speeches were given as well as songs, for the observances on that day.

All of the cemeteries were decorated with flowers; from Thursday night the graves were being decorated until noon of the following Friday, showing that the observation of Decoration Day is given much thought to by the people these days.

A majority of the day was spent by the people going around from graveyard to graveyard looking at the adornments of the graves, and one thing heard amongst the people making their rounds was that the flowers and lei done with great care were beautiful.

At nine thirty in the morning, the parade of the soldiers and some organizations began from within the palace grounds up to the cemetery in Nuuanu, and being that some people were occupied with prayers at other cemeteries, this parade was not given any thought to, except by those who were not participating in decorating flowers on that day.

[Memorial Day (Decoration Day), which was held on the 30th of May and is now held on the last Monday of May, can be found in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers as La Kaupua (“day to place flowers”) or La Lupua (“day to strew flowers”).]

(Kuokoa, 6/5/1924, p. 1)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA KAUPUA MA HONOLULU NEI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 23, Aoao 1. Iune 5, 1924.