A day to remember, 1924.

THE “DAY TO PLACE FLOWERS” WAS OBSERVED HERE IN HONOLULU

Just as in years past where Decoration Day [La Kaupua] was observed, so too has it come again on this past Friday, as the graves in the different cemeteries were decorated, and also a parade of soldiers was held upland of the cemetery of Nuuanu, where speeches were given as well as songs, for the observances on that day.

All of the cemeteries were decorated with flowers; from Thursday night the graves were being decorated until noon of the following Friday, showing that the observation of Decoration Day is given much thought to by the people these days.

A majority of the day was spent by the people going around from graveyard to graveyard looking at the adornments of the graves, and one thing heard amongst the people making their rounds was that the flowers and lei done with great care were beautiful.

At nine thirty in the morning, the parade of the soldiers and some organizations began from within the palace grounds up to the cemetery in Nuuanu, and being that some people were occupied with prayers at other cemeteries, this parade was not given any thought to, except by those who were not participating in decorating flowers on that day.

[Memorial Day (Decoration Day), which was held on the 30th of May and is now held on the last Monday of May, can be found in the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers as La Kaupua (“day to place flowers”) or La Lupua (“day to strew flowers”).]

(Kuokoa, 6/5/1924, p. 1)

HOOMANAOIA KA LA KAUPUA MA HONOLULU NEI

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXIII, Helu 23, Aoao 1. Iune 5, 1924.

Another article covering the same story about the two ladies, 1912.

DIED AT GRAVESIDE

Attended the Funeral of Her Friend Who Died, and They Died Together.

THEY ARE TWO HAOLE WOMEN

Because of the Grief of One Over the Death of the Other is the Reason She Passed.

At the side of the grave where her friend was laid, on the afternoon of this past Monday, mauka at the cemetery of Maemae, is where an older haole woman collapsed and died when they were preparing to cover the coffin of her friend, Mrs. Margaret J. Healy with soil; her name was Mrs. Elizabeth Stevenson.

They were two woman who shared the bonds of aloha in their last days of their lives on this earth, and they left together to the other side, without one feeling sadness for the other in one dying before the other, and one being left behind in this world grieving.

They were both old ladies at the King’s Daughters’ Home which takes care of haole women in difficulty; but on this past Sunday, Mrs. Healy died, leaving the rest of the old ladies living in the home feeling very sad.

The remaining women were persistent in trying to get permission to attend the funeral of their friend who died, but their request was denied at first, however, because of their great sadness, they were all freely allowed to gather at the funeral in the church and mauka at the cemetery of Maemae.

When the coffin was lowered into the grave, and when the graveside service was over, that was when Mrs. Stevenson fainted, and in a short time, her last breath left her, and this made the grief of the friends gathered there increase twofold.

(Kuokoa, 2/9/1912, p. 1)

MAKE MA KA'E O KA LUA KUPAPAU

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 6, Aoao 1. Feberuari 9, 1912.