More on Kalaniopuu’s ahuula and mahiole, 1887.

Captain Cook Relics.

Speaking of the Captain Cook relics which have been secured for the New South Wales Government, our London correspondent says, writing on September 9:—”Sir Saul Samuel has secured for the New South Wales Government the whole of the interesting collection of Captain Cook’s relics which were on view at the late Colonial and Indian Exhibition. Some of them he has had to purchase, others have been presented as gift. Your…

(Sydney Mail, 10/22/1887, p. 868)

SydneyMail_10_22_1887_868

The Sydney Mail, Volume XLIV, Number 1424, Page 868. October 22, 1887.

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Lord St Oswald and the ahuula and mahiole of Kalaniopuu, 1912.

CAPTAIN COOK RELICS.

LORD ST. OSWALD’S GENEROUS GIFT TO NEW ZEALAND.

VALUABLE HAWAIIAN CLOAKS AND MAORI CARVINGS.

A visitor strolling into the dingy recesses of the Colonial Museum at Wellington (says the “Press”) might have noticed some peculiar looking feather cloaks and other curios of a dinginess in keeping with their worm-eaten domicile, and apparently of no great worth. In reality, however, they are articles of almost priceless value, genuine members of the great English circumnavigator, Captain Cook. Not only so, but they are connected intimately with his voyages and discoveries in the South Pacific and with the Hawaiian Islands and New Zealand in particular. They are the generous gift to New Zealand of Lord St. Oswald, whose forbears bought them at the sale of Bullock’s Museum on April 29, 1819. When Bullock died his famous collection was offered to the British Museum for £50,000, but refused, and it was subsequently disposed of at auction.

The main feature of Lord St. Oswald’s gift is the magnificent feather cloak and helmet presented to Captain Cook a short time before his death by the King of Owhyee. This robe is particularly described by Captain Cook in the account of his voyages. The cloak, which is in a remarkably fine state of preservation, is made mainly from countless small feathers of the Yellow Roo (Destia ral coxinia), a bird long since extinct. The feathers have, with inifinite patience, been woven one by one into a fibre base. The feather helmet is remarkable in that in shape it is almost a counterpart of the helmet in which our allegorical figure of Britannia is portrayed, with the crest of comb that was a characteristic of the Burgonet of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries particularly prominent, which can be traced back to the early Roman times. How the Hawaiians had got this idea of the mediæval helmet before the discovery of the islands by Captain Cook is somewhat of a mystery, unless it be that the Spanish had previously visited the islands. This seems highly probable. There is also an Hawaiian hat of the time of Captain Cook, a very rare exhibit. It is round, crowned, and broad-rimmed. One has seen many modern hats made on exactly the same lines; indeed, if one were to put a few larger feathers on it, and some modern trimming, it might almost pass muster on a racecourse or at a garden party of the present day. Continue reading

Ninipo Hoonipo Song in Australia, 1927.

AMUSEMENTS

THE HAWAIIAN TROUBADOURS. The soft lapping of Pacific breakers lazily breaking on Waikiki beach, moon light, soft breezes whispering through the palm trees, Hawaian maidens crooning a soft “Aloha,” a song of love, in which all the witchery of the tropical night comes stealing across the waters, are conveyed by Kaai’s Hawaian Troubadours, who again charmed a large audience last night at the National Theatre. Particularly effective was their singing of “Imi Au Oe,”¹ “Na Ke Aloha,” and “Ninipo,” In which the Troubadours greeted the dawn; “Ukulele Lady,” “Collegiate,” “Hawaian Blues.” of every known and unknown variety; as well as other items of past and present popularity. Not to be forgotten was Tuavivi, Greig’s “Persuasion” Hula, in which she revealed all the languid grace and symmetry of the dusky beauties of the south. The ensemble of the closing revue was another outstanding item of tropical colour and harmony. The season will terminate to-morrow night.

[Earlier, i posted Liliuokalani’s “Ninipo Hoonipo Song”, and strangely enough, i ran across this reference to it being sung all the way in Australia in 1928!]

¹”Imi Au Ia Oe”

(Examiner, 4/22/1927, p. 6)

AMUSEMENTS.

The Examiner, Volume LXXXV, Number 95, Page 6. April 22, 1927.

“Kaai’s Hawaiians” on TROVE, 1928.

KAAI’S HAWAIIANS.

Kaaiʻs Hawaiians, who will open at the Garden Theatre on March 3, have recently concluded a season of 120 nights in Sydney. They include the Moana Jazz Four, who were specially engaged at the Wembley Exhibition. The head of the company is Ernest Kaai, the composer of   “Aloha oe,” which is virtally the Hawaiiian national anthem. He has written and opera, which was successfully pro…

Miss Tuavivi Greig

…duced in London, and he has his own publishing house and an intsruments factory. The combination has been touring the world since 1906. There are nine men   and six women in the company, and there is every possibility that Queenie and   David Kaili, who are we know here, will join them for the Adelaide season. Tuavivi,   who is a member of the company, is a noted hula dancer.

[This comes from an Adelaide, South Australia newspaper, found on the National Library of Australia webside, TROVE. It seems unclear newspaper images is not something limited to Hawaii nei. However, at least the text on that site is correctable.]

(Advertiser, 2/23/1923, p. 11)

KAAI'S HAWAIIANS.

The Advertiser, Volume LXX, Number 21645, Page 11. February 23, 1928.

A couple of more days… 2013.

I will be away for a couple of more days. But in the meantime, click here to check out TROVE, the National Library of Australia website!

I am impressed by the wide range of capabilities. See what you all think.

Here for example you can see all the newspaper articles including the name Liliuokalani:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=Liliuokalani&sortby=dateAsc