Death of Capt. Alexander Adams, 1871.

The death of Kapena A. Adamu.—On this past Friday, Oct. 27, here in the town of Honolulu, Captain Alexander Adams [Alekanadero Adamu] died at 91 years and 10 month of age on this earth. He was born in Scotland in 1780, and he died on the sands of Kakuhihewa [Oahu]. He first came to Hawaii nei in the year 1810. Not long after, he was soon under the employment of Kamehameha the great. He was the Captain who sailed the double-masted ship Kamehameha to China with a cargo of sandalwood [iliahi], and that wood from Hawaii was heavily taxed. That was the first haole and pilot who entered the port of Kou [Honolulu]. He lived in Hawaii for 61 years becoming a local.

(Kuokoa, 11/4/1871, p. 2)

Ka make ana o Kapena A. Adamu.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke X, Helu 44, Aoao 2. Novemaba 4, 1871.

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Reforesting Puu Ohia, Oahu, 1900.

PERTAINING TO GROWING SANDALWOOD.

On the return of Governor Dole from his travels to Hawaii, he brought back some seed of trees growing in the mountains of that island to grow here on the ridges of Puu Ohia [Tantalus]. Among these were koa and iliahi seeds. This tree, the iliahi, will be increased; it was believed no longer existing on these islands because of abuse during the days of Kamehameha I. However, it is said that there is a great number of these trees growing in the mountains of Molokai. From here forth, the government will try to care well for these ancient tree of the land.

(Aloha Aina, 8/25/1900, p. 5)

NO KA HOOULU ANA I NA LAAU ILIAHI.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VI, Helu 34, Aoao 5. Augate 25, 1900.

Replanting of native plants, 1901!

HAWAIIAN PLANTS WILL BE GROWN AGAIN.

Under the direction of Mr. Haughs, the nurseryman of the government, the planting of Hawaiian plants in the valley of Nuuanu will be attempted, to make that valley verdant once again with native plants, so that it will be just as beautiful as it was fifty or more years ago. These seedlings were sent by Ebena Lo [Eben Low] from his residence at Puuwaawaa, Hawaii, to Commissioner Taylor, those being aaka, holei, aalii, ohia, kolea, opiko, akia, alahee, kauila, uhiuhi, iliahi, lama, and olapa.

It is said that it has been about 50 years that these plants were growing in abundance in Nuuanu Valley, for with the influx of animals and the mass cutting of trees for firewood, the beautiful forest of times gone by became a barren field.

The government will spend a sum of money to grow and foster this new forest, however, we believe that there is no way that the beauty of the forest which God grew originally and which was damaged by man will be attained by this new forest which is intended to be grown.

(Aloha Aina, 12/7/1901, p. 4)

E HOOULU HOU IA ANA NA LAAU HAWAII.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke VII, Helu 49, Aoao 4. Dekemaba 7, 1901.