Building for movies and entertainment to be built in Kalaupapa, 1915.

ANNOUNCEMENT

Because of the benevolence of the Board of Health [Papa Ola], by them taking up the building of a Movie and Entertainment House for the Patient Colony [Kahua Ma’i] here, we therefore revoke our Requests put out by us to the Fundraising Committees which were approved by us. As for the Committees that collected money for this endeavor, please send it to the Secretary of the Committee, Mr. Joseph Aiona, or to the Superintendent [Lunanui] of this Patient Colony, Mr. J. D. McVeigh.

By way of the Committee, the people of the Patient Colony send their boundless thanks to the Fundraising Committees [Komite Ohi Dala] for this work, and to all those who gave their donation. May God bless us all in the Name of Jesus, Amen.  JOSEPH AIONA,

Secretary.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/30/1915, p. 3)

OLELO HOOLAHA

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 10, Helu 30, Aoao 3. Dekemaba 30, 1915.

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More on the 11th of June in Kalaupapa, 1904.

11th of June

Sports at Kalaupapa

High holiday [Kamehameha Day] was kept by the inhabitants of the Leper Settlement throughout the 11th of June. As a matter of fact the jollification began on the eve of Kamehameha Day, with a concert by the “H. H. K.’s” [Hui Hooikaika Kino] or the Kalaupapa Athletic Club, in Beretania hall. The program consisted of athletic exercises, singing, etc.

At 7 a. m., on the 11th the boys of Baldwin Home, Kalawao, headed by their band, set out for Kalaupapa to attend the day’s sports and games. The first event was a shooting match for a dinner, between teams captained by Dr. Goodhue and Superintendent McVeigh. It began at 8 o’clock. The Kalawao band played at short intervals during the match. McVeigh’s team won, so that the doctor’s side had to provide the dinner. Following is the score, ten rounds each:

PROGRAM 11TH OF JUNE SPORTS AT KALAUPAPA.

Shooting match for a dinner furnished by the losing team. The match commenced at 8 a. m. Following are the scores:

FIRST TEAM.

J. D. McVeigh ….. 43
J. K. Waiamau ….. 38
Kea Kaehanui ….. 38
M. Klammer ….. 38
J. K. Alapai ….. 36
J. S. Wilmington ….. 32
W. Bruns ….. 31
E. Van Lil ….. 31
Chas. Roth ….. 31
John Forbes ….. 31
Kalani Kaena ….. 30
Wm. Paoo ….. 20
Alex. Smith ….. 19
Punilio ….. 17
Total ….. 435

SECOND TEAM.

W. J. Goodhue …. 37
Achong Holuk ….. 36
Jas. Amaka ….. 36
Haumea ….. 34
Kaaihue ….. 34
Geo. Kanikau ….. 34
Geo. Kaaepa ….. 32
Silas Carter ….. 31
J. H. Imihia ….. 31
N. Kealoha ….. 29
I. Hoolapa ….. 29
Chas. Manua ….. 24
D. N. Nawelu ….. 17
Kaha ….. 15
Total ….. 119

The horse races began at 12 o’clock on the quarter mile track. There was a great turnout of the people and enthusiasm ran high. Drays had been sent around the Settlement to fetch all who were unable to walk. The judges were: Jas. Harvest, chairman; George Kanikau, Achong Ho Luk, Jno. K. Waiamau and John T. Unea (teacher). Following is the program of the races with the winners noted:

HORSE RACES.

1. Match Race—½ mile. Purse, $10.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Spanish, by S. Carter. Won by Spanish.
2. Bicycle Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Jno. Fernandez, Kawehi, A. Galaspo. Won by A. Galespo.
3. Horse Race—½ mile. Free to all; for horses not entered in any race before. Purse, $7.00. Entries: Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kalaupapa Girl.
4. Relay Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. No entries.
5. Pony Race—½ mile. Free to all. Purse, $8.00. Entries: Baltimore, by R. Kekipi; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Kaukaiwa.
6. Wheelbarrow Race—¼ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: D. Ku, J. Kauhane, Kakae, Sol. Momoa. Won by Sol. Momoa.
7. Women’s Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Lively, by Kaupali; Billy Huihui, by Punohu. Won by Billy Huihui.
8. Barrel Race—¼ mile. Purse, $1.50. Entries: J. Kauhane, Sol. Momoa, Kakae, Hamauku, Kawehi. Won by Sol. Momoa.
9. Horse Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $5.00. Entries: Maluikeao, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukeano, by S. Carter. Winner undecided. Dead heat.
10. Foot Race—¼ mile. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Kauhane, Kawehi, Hulihee, Sol. Momoa. Won by J. Kauhane.
11. Pony Race—¼ mile. Free to all. Purse, $4.00. Entries: Bob, by J. Moloni; Keahi o Wailuku, by Jno. Naluai; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing; Kalaupapa Girl, by S. Carter. Won by Kaukaiwa.
12. Saddle Relay Race—½ mile. Purse, $4.00. Entries: 1st team—Kamaka, Levi, Holokahiki, Kaena; 2nd team—Nawelu, Kahaulelio, S. Kaai, Moloni. Won by first team.
13. Scrub Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $3.00. Entries: Midnight, by J. Moloni; Bay View, by J. Kapuni; Mikimiki, by S. Carter. Won by Bay View.
14. Foot Race—½ mile. For boys under 13 years of age. Purse, $2.00. Entries: J. Hanakahi, Kelii, J. Francisco. Won by J. Hanakahi.
15. Winners’ Horse Race—½ mile. Purse, $12.00. Entries: Spanish, by S. Carter; Kaukaiwa, by Ten Sing. Won by Spanish.

THE DINNER.

“It was a dandy dinner,” Superintendent McVeigh said yesterday, referring to the evening feast on the shooting match. All the concomitants of a first-class luau were provided, including a bounteous supply of roast pig, together with soda water and cake in abundance. About 120 of the people partook of the repast. The festivities lasted until 12 o’clock Saturday night. In the course of the luau a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the Honolulu contributors of funds for the day’s celebration, with special mention of Acting Governor Atkinson’s agency in soliciting contributions.

“There was never a better behaved crowd,” Mr. McVeigh said with reference to the sports. “At the shooting match nobody was allowed to speak while one was taking aim. They whooped it up, good and strong, after the match and at the horse races.”

PATRIOTIC DISPLAY.

A goodly display of flags was made during the day. The Stars and Stripes was flying on the schoolhouse, the storehouse, the Settlement office, the superintendent’s house and the doctor’s house.

A good day’s sport is expected at the Settlement on the Fourth of July, to consist of athletic exercises and games in the daytime and fireworks in the evening. The good-hearted Honolulu folks will no doubt make timely contributions of money and articles of values for prizes.

[This article followed the illustration by John K. Waiamau posted earlier today.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/17/1904, p. 5)

11th of June

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume XXXIX, Number 49, Page 5. June 17,

Dogs and the Leprosy Colony, 1903.

DOGS TO BE TAKEN

The Board of Health [Papa Ola] released a new rule which was approved by Governor S. B. Dole, ordering each and every leprosy patient and kokua of the leprosy colony of Molokai, that they may not keep more than one dog. The supervisor will enforce these new rules of the Board of Health.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 6)

HOPU IA NA ILIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 6. Aperila 25, 1903.

Complaint against police officers in Kalaupapa, 1903.

RESPONSE TO THE POLICE OF KALAUPAPA.

Mr. Editor of Ke Aloha Aina,

Aloha oe:—

May it please your honorable to allow me the mouth of our cannon, and may you flash so that the honored members of the Legislature may see this:

The officers of Kalaupapa nei have made a petition asking the Legislature to increase their salary to $30 per month, being that their current pay is just $20; the asking of the officers for $30 a month is very questionable. What great work do we see them doing; is it going around to the homes of the patients and entering without search warrants, or when the Sheriff gives them orders, these officers do as they please?

They brush aside the orders from their Sheriff and return; they did not put their petition before their head, J. K. Waiamau [Deputy Superintendent], and I hear that they were all admonished; I truly believe that $20 a month is enough for them.

Here is another thing, your writer has heard that five kokua are being sent out, two men and three women. They have only two weeks to ready their belongings. Our Superintendent [McVeigh] is bristling.  I stop my pen here, and to the metal typesetting boys goes my greeting of good-bye all.

H. K. AKAMU.

Kalaupapa, Molokai, April 21, 1903.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 8)

HE PANE I NA MAKAI O KALAUPAPA.

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 8. Aperila 25, 1903.

Kokua being sent out of Kalaupapa, 1903.

Desire to Live in Kalaupapa

According to reports, most of the assistants [kokua] and the people who have been diagnosed not to have leprosy have requested of the Board of Health to remain in Kalaupapa.

Amongst these requests, four have staunchly opposed their being removed from the place of the sick. In accordance with the thought of the Board of Health, some requests were granted while others were denied.

The petitions of Mrs. Jessie Kaeana and Mrs. Lahela Amaka for their husbands to go to the colony as kokua were approved, and Superintendent McVeigh [Lunanui Maka-we] helped in this.

C. Kopena, a kokua that was ordered by the Board of Health to leave, asked that the decision be changed. The Board of Health gave the 31st of August as his last day to live in the colony. Kopena stated that he lived there for a long time and has not in the least gone against the Board of Health. When he left for the colony, he sold all of his assets, believing that he would spend the rest of his days there; and now, he is unable to return to the outside world unless he has supplies. If the Board is set upon his leaving, he needs to be given a home outside, and if not, he will become a vagabond of the earth.

According to Superintendent McVeigh, Kopena refuses to work, and has tried to join in with the rest of the kokua to defy the power of the Board of Health. For this reason, the request was denied.

McVeigh stated that when telling Kopena the Board of Health decided to remove him from the colony, Kopena said, “ko ke hele”¹, and that he would be staying.

That was not the case of Mr. and Mrs. Imihia. They asked the Board to allow the two of them to live there because they have no ohana left living, and they don’t have enough money to sustain them for two days.

Mr. McVeigh asked that they live in the colony and he said that Imihia works hard and is a farmer. The request was approved.

The request of Simms was denied for him to continue living in the colony, because he was suspected of having leprosy, but he will be released after he receives his clearance.

According to the explanation of McVeigh, Simms is one of the most lazy blacks that he has seen, and he should be sent out to work for himself.

The request of Sam Kaaiko and his wife was approved to go to the colony to visit their child.

Mrs. H. K. Aylett’s request was denied to take her young child to the colony.

¹Hawaiianization of the phrase, “go to hell.”

(Kuokoa, 8/7/1903, p. 3)

Ua Makemake e Noho i Kalaupapa

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLI, Helu 32, Aoao 3. Augate 7, 1903.

Detailed list of patients being examined at Kalawao, 1909.

THE PATIENTS OF MOLOKAI ARE EXAMINED.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha no: Please allow me some space on your deck along with the captain’s passengers travelling aboard your ship (newspaper) and it is for you and your sailors to [anybody care to offer insight into this nautical allusion? “a nau ame kou mau luina e kulai pau iho i na nihoniho o ke ku’e keleawe o ka enekini uwila…”] and to send knowledge from Hawaii, the island of Keawe, all the way to Kauai of Manokalanipo.

Here are your loved ones, a husband, a wife, a child, a grandchild, a daughter, a grand, a great grand; and they turn towards home, to see and to smell once again the cool air of the land (should they return); the fish is an uku, a fish of Kahoolawe.¹

O Reader, shown will be the names and the years they have lived here in the land of the sick without counting the months and days.

Therefore, the number placed before [after] each name is the total years lived here in the land of the sick and the land where they were taken from; for the names without numbers, they don’t want it to be known, and some have not met with the writer; the writer put great effort into completing it, but he could not for it was a big task.

At 11:30 at night on the 13th of October, 1909, the S. S. Likelike arrived at the restless harbor of Kalaupapa; the wind was calm, but the disembarking of the passengers was still rough, they being J. D. McVeigh, Superintendent of the Leprosy Colony; Dr. Wayson; photographer Charles W. Weatherwax and Kikila the secretary of the doctors.

On the 14th, at 9 or so, the doctors W. J. Goodhue and Wayson arrived with the Secretary J. K. Keliikuli, interpreter at the dispensary; and the examination of the patients began; and to Kalawao went the honor of the first examination, as follows:

P. Kiha (m), Maui; Mary Maialoha (m), 3, Kawaihae, Hawaii; Heaekulani (m) 21, Honolulu; William Holokahiki (m), Waihee; Kinoole (f); Sarah Opu (f), Moloaa, Kauai; S. Kapela (m) 4, Honolulu; Ane Naholoholo (m) 15, Honolulu; Kealawaiole (m) 4, Honolulu; Ui Kapiioho (m); Holo Kapela (f) 17, Maui; L. M. Paianamu (m) 6, Honolulu; John Kaiu (m) 7, Kauai; George Mahiai (m), Maui; K. M. Kalunakaahele (m), Kauai; John Keawekane 4, Honolulu; Hulihee (m) 14, Molokai; Wehekaiaulu (m); Lau Chan (m), Honolulu; Naolulo (f) 1, Hilo; George Kahoukapu (m) 3; Kealoha Nalima (f) 22; D. Moae (m) 21, Kohala; Kekuni (m); Loika Pauole (f), Kauai; Pahupiula (f) 20, Honolulu; Lizzie Aiakamanu (f) 8, Kauai; Elia Kaaihue (m) 4, Puna; Kawai Hoy (f) 3, Honolulu; D. Noholoa (m) 13, Honolulu; Ellen Noholoa (f) 5, Honolulu; Solomon Momoa (m) 20, Honolulu; William Kaha (m) 24, Paholei, Maui; Kela Liilii (f) 25, Hawaii; Kaluna Ma (f) 30, Kipahulu, Maui; Sam Lowell (m) 4, Honolulu; Makanui D. Umi (f) 6, Honolulu; Pahia (m) 4, Kauai; Makanui (f) 8, Hanalei, Kauai; Kalani Silva (f) 6, Honolulu; Hattie Kalua (f) 4, Honolulu; Kawehi (m) 24, Lahaina; Kailiau (m) 3, Kohala; Mary Naeole (f), Kauai; Kaomi (m); Kalani (m); Palea (m); Pakoma (m) 3, Kauai; Joe Kauhane (m) 15, Honolulu; George Kahele; Komo (m); Pekelo (m), Honolulu; James Harvest (m) 18, Honolulu; Pika (m); Kahawaii (f) 4, Honolulu; Kelii Makakoa (m) 11, Honolulu; Hanapule (f) 4, Honolulu; J. A. Kamakele (m) 7, Kona; D. Ku (m) 22, Honolulu; Victoria Kaai (f) 20, Huelo, Maui; Kanamu Mokuhau (f) 20; Kamai (m) 8; Kaulana (m) 6, Molokai; Rose Meyers (f) 3; Kauwe (f) 3, Hilo; Nahua (m) 16, Kona; Kuhi (m) 4, Molokai; Ponepake (m) 22, Honolulu; Naihe Pukai (m) 22, Kauai; Halemano (m) 5, Honolulu; Hairama Pahau (m) 15, Honolulu; Annie Kekoa (f) 3, Hilo; Kaua Lihau (f) 14, Hamakua; C. Kaeha (m) 4, Honolulu; Kawaha (f) 26, Kauai; Liloa (m) 4, Maui; Kunihi (m) 28, Molokai; Kamai Naihe (f) 25, Honolulu; Nui (f) 28, Hilo; Kaaihue (m) 39, Maui; Emma Kuaokala (f) 4, Hilo; Kailianu (f) 80, Kalaupapa; Emily Kaihumua (f) 4, Honolulu; Maulia (m) 13, Honolulu; Annie McMillan (f), Honolulu; Ellena McMillan (f); Joe Lowell (m) 3, Kauai; Agnes Holstein (f), Kohala; Lui Hoolapa (m), Kona; D. N. Hoopilimeaai (m) 10, Maui; Malaia (f) 10, Kauai; Huleia (m) 16, Kauai; Pelekila Ioane (f) 4, Maui; Mary Kapukana (f), Hawaii; Peter Akua (m), Maui; Kuheleloa Nailima (m) 13, Kalaupapa; Kahaleuai Nailima (m) 12, Kalaupapa; Hoaeae Nailima (m) 14, Kalaupapa; William Kalimalu (m) 10, Hilo; Kanaue (m) 10, Honolulu; Kinoole (f) 27; Willie Kalani (m) 20, Puako, South Kohala; Moses Pauli (m) 21, Koolau, Oahu; Kahaleanu (m) 13, Hilo; Lilia Kepano (f) 4, Honolulu; Alika Smith (m) 19, Wailuku, Maui; Kaele (m) 20, Honolulu; Kawaiku (m) 6, Hana; K. Keaweamahi (m) 15, Honolulu; M. Mattson (m) 7, Maui; Mary Smith (f) 8, Honolulu; Ah Sin (m) 5, Wailuku; Kea Kaihanui (m) 21, Waihee; Charlotte Kaopua (f) 4, Kohala; Mary Ann (f) 4, Honolulu; Kakalina (f); Ah Sin (m) 3, Kohala; John Moke (m) 22; Alika (m) 23, Maui; William Kaleiheana (m) 13; Meliaka (f) 17, Kauai; Julia Manuia (f) 7, Waialua; Hukia Manu (m) 16, Maui; Sarah Alohikea (f) 20, Kohala; Mose Kaulahea (m) 2, Molokai; Mary Mokuahi 19; John Waiwaiole (m) 4, Hilo; Keala Kaike (f) 1, Puna, Hawaii; Kalani wahine (m) 3 months, Waimea, Hawaii; Mary Kamealani (f) 8, Kawaihapai, Waialua; Sam Kaluahine (m) 7; J. Uha (m) 22, Lahaina; Koloa (m) 20, Maui; Maraea Holokahiki (f) 3 months, Kalaupapa; Hawea Manini (f) 4, Wailuku, Maui; total 133.

There are names left; perhaps they are those who knew the troubles ahead, for the road ahead is unclear, as the path is not laid out well, and some will return in confusion; wise are those who did not sign, but there will come a time when this will end.

With great aloha,

S. K. M. NAHAUOWAILEIA.

Kalawao, Molokai, October 19, 1909.

¹”He uku ia he i’a no Kahoolawe.” A traditional saying playing off the word “uku “which is a type of fish, but also means reward or recompense.

[Wow… this took a long time, but i think it is an awesome document well worth the time put in. My aloha goes out to S. K. M. Nahauowaileia and the type-setting boys of the Kuokoa!!]

(Kuokoa, 10/29/1909, p. 6)

NANAIA NA MA'I O MOLOKAI.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVI, Helu 44, Aoao 6. Okatoba 29, 1909.

Patients of the leprosy settlement present gift to the Waipa Trio, 1922.

Presented by the Patients of Molokai

By way of the director of the leprosy settlement on Molokai, Mr. J. D. McVeigh, the patients gave a gift to the Band of John Waipa (The Waipa Twintett) [Waipa Trio]; that singing and musical group that travelled with Representative H. A. Baldwin, to Molokai, in his effort to increase voting; and on this past Monday, Director J. D. McVeigh carried out the duty given to him, by him appearing before Mr. John Waipa and presenting him with this gift, a sum of money donated by the patients of Molokai.

There are three people in that band: Mr. John Waipa, Mrs. Waipa, and Miss Flora Waipa; and because of the great joy and admiration that the patients had in the band, they showed this through the sending of this present; the gift was grasped by Mr. John Waipa and his family with pleasure, and they were filled with awe at this act done for them by the patients.

For this esteemed gift given by the patients of Kalawao and Kalaupapa to the singing group of Mr. Waipa, he and his family extend the endless appreciation to all of them, along with their request to all those who gave the gift, to accept their thanks and to always remember that their gift will be something for them to remember throughout their lives.

They also give their great appreciation to Director J. D. McVeigh for the warm hospitality extended to them while they were at the settlement on Molokai; and above all else, it is God who gives his highest blessings from above.

(Kuokoa, 4/28/1922, p. 1)

Haawi Makanaia Mai e na Ma'i o Molokai

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 17, Aoao 1. Aperila 28, 1922.