More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.

Sanford B. Dole, the Congregationalists, and Annexation, 1902.

THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION.

On Monday evening, April 28 last, Governor Dole was the guest of the Congregational Club of Boston. Elsewhere in this issue will be found a sketch made by Dole of the Hawaiian situation. It is characteristic of the man. Having the full support of the Administration behind him he is not afraid to say in public what he has been thinking in private for many long years. Let us see and take up his points one by one.

Point No. 1.—”The monarchy was overthrown and annexation was accomplished for the sake of good government for the islands; that is, for their benefit.”—It is true! Annexation was accomplished, by a handful of Congregationalists because the reciprocity treaty between the United States and Hawaii was in imminent danger of being abrogated. The monarchy was overthrown, so as to save the $40 per ton duty on sugar. It was then as it is now for the Congregationalists:—Money before principle.

Point No. 2:—”We have given you everything we have by being annexed.”—That is, Sanford B. Dole, and his Congregationalist friends have given to the United States that which did not belong to them. With the help of an American cruiser, American marines and an American Minister, they have robbed the native Hawaiians of their country so as to enable a few Congregationalist planters to keep up receiving big dividends from their sugar stocks which would have been materially cut down had a $40 duty been imposed upon each ton of sugar. The Springfield Republican adds the following comment to Point No. 2: “But the second point that they have given us all they have is not at all consistent with his first point that they sought Annexation for the benefit of the Islands, and it shows that they are still trying to work the United States for the benefit of the Hawaiians.” Continue reading

Mafia? 1893.

AN AMERICAN MAFIA.

“The Queen never will be restored to the throne, for she will be shot within 24 hours, and every man who takes office under her will be shot also—we have men secretly sworn to do it.”

Such was the remark made to the writer by a brainless young sprig of the “citizens reserve,” such is the tenor of numerous open threats of the canaille composing the annexation club, the citizens reserve and the American league organizations that pretending to be patriotically American are in fact veritable nests of socialism, fenianism and mafia.

To their shame be it said that these mafias are organized under men calling themselves Americans, men who heretofore have been regarded as respectable and intelligent citizens: Hatch, Castle, Wilder, Jones, Smith, McGrew, Emerson, and so on, whose names will pass into history as knavish pirates in a plot to steal a nation and compel America to receive the stolen goods.

A recent article in the Holomua warned that a wave of insanity had struck Honolulu in accordance with a well known theory of cycles. The malady appears to be growing worse, for certain it is, that all the men and women concerned in the overthrow of the Queen, the terrorism and misgovernment of a P. G. military despotism, and the present display of hostilities against the United States, all act like people demented. Continue reading

The great protest of July 2, 1894.

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Five Thousand Loyalist Protest Against the So-Called Republic.

Without advertising, without preparations, a crowd of loyal citizens met yesterday on Palace Square, and then there did solemnly protest against the proclamation of a republic, not representing the people, not established for the benefit of the masses but virtually made for the sole benefit of the small and insignificant clique placed in power by J. L. Stevens and American troops in controversy of justice, honor, and popular will.

Over five thousand people gathered, among whom were all classes, all nationalities and all friends of popular government. The meeting was most orderly, and as Nawahi urged in opening the meeting, free from any undue demonstration, free from noise generally attached to a political meeting. Mr. J. O. Carter, one of the oldest and best known citizens in the country read the resolution, protesting against the so-called republic. Messrs. Bush, Nawahi and Kaulia spoke to the Hawaiians in most eloquent terns, and translated the resolution which was received with tremendous cheering by the Hawaiians. The following is the text of the resolution.

Be it resolved. That the Hui Aloha Aina and other patriotic leagues, together with the loyal subjects of the Hawaiian Kingdom, in mass meeting assembled, representing by far the greater majority of the legitimate voters of this country, do hereby most solemnly protest against the promulgation of a new Constitution, formed without the consent and participation of the people, and we also protest against changing the form of government from the one under which we have lived peacefully and prosperously for many years. And that we maintain that the will of the majority of the legitimate voters of Hawaii should be the supreme power of the land, as such power is so recognized and accepted in all civilized countries, and by all the enlightened governments of the world.

(Hawaii Holomua, 7/3/1894, p. 2)

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 154, Page 2. July 3, 1894.

The call to protest in English, 1894.

A SOLEMN PROTEST.

The People of Hawaii protest against the New Constitution and Mr. Dole’s Republic.

This afternoon at five o’clock the loyal citizens of Hawaii will meet on Palace Square, and enter a solemn and earnest protest against the infamous outrage, which it is proposed to perpetuate on Wednesday—the proclaiming of a republic of filibusters, the proclamation of a constitution framed by aliens and for the sole benefit of certain classes.

The temporary power invested in the provisional government was obtained through a most contemptible conspiracy, and through underhanded tricks. The revolt of January 1893 was not the outcome of a spontaneous outburst of the popular will. It was the most contemptible act on record in history. The hired brigand John L. Stevens used his brief authority to further this scheme. The country which he represented disavowed his actions and thought that the honor of the United States was saved by dismissing him, and in six lines in a message to congress rebuking him.

The world thinks differently, and there are no reasons to believe hat President Cleveland will allow himself, and his administration to be covered with infamy by leaving an admitted wrong unrepaired.

In this, the fin de siecle, the bloody ravage of war and revolution is out of fashion and arbitration has taken the place of force. But, it is necessary to show to the world that the Hawaiian People are not participating in the revolutionary movement of the oath-breaking ex-Judge, who now maskerades as a president of a republic. The People of Hawaii believe in self-government and, by the Heavens they will have it. The people shall rule. The will of the people shall be the force which makes the government.

When, this afternoon, Hawaiians and foreigners be the Anglo-Saxons, Portuguese or Chinese, stand sholder to shoulder and listen to J. O. Carter, Hawaii’s best citizen, reading the protest of Hawaii against the usurpers the loyal men they can rest assured that their protest will be heard and echoed all over the civilized world, and that the unrelenting and solid opposition to the junta, now calling themselves a republic, will be supported and admired by every power that knows the existence of these fair isles. Let therefore every man, woman and child of every race, nationality and birth be present on Palace Square, and by their presence testify to the true desire of the people of Hawaii, and quietly, orderly and peacefully prove to the world that the new government is unpopular, detested, and created against the will of the Hawaiian nation.

(Hawaii Holomua, 7/2/1894, p. 2)

A SOLEMN PROTEST.

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 153, Page 2. July 2, 1894.

Kahikina Kelekona, John G. M. Sheldon, editor of the Hawaii Holomua, arrested for speaking, 1893.

LIBERTY OF THE SUBJECT.

Has Anybody Any Rights Under the Provisional Government?

Argument of the Question in the Circuit Court.

John G. M. Sheldon, editor of the Holomua, who is deprived of his liberty under a warrant issued by the President of the Provisional Government, was produced in the First Circuit Court before Judge Frear, at 11 o’clock this forenoon, under a writ of habeas corpus. Attorney-General Smith and F. M. Hatch appeared for the Government, and C. W. Ashford, C. Creighton, A. Rosa and J. L. Kaulukou for the prisoner.

Mr. C. W. Ashford argued for the discharge of the prisoner, speaking to the following effect: There was no authority vested in the Executive and Advisory Councils to issue warrants of arrest. President Dole had no right in the Proclamation of the Provisional Government to issue a warrant of arrest. The Government could not go behind that proclamation, he presumed. “We the People of the Hawaiian Islands” gave him no such power. If “We the People of the Hawaiian Islands” had intended to exercise that power they would have given it to him. The Proclamation stated that the President’s duties were to preside over the meetings of the Executive Council. Mr. Dole now holds no judicial position in these islands. He did hold such position before, but resigned it to become President of the Provisional Government. If that warrant, of President Dole was valid, then there was no security of liberty for any man, woman or child under these tropic skies. There was then nothing to prevent any resident of this country being consigned to a dungeon or bound in irons. It should be known whether the Provisional Government had such tremendous powers. He was not making a covert attack on the late revolution. He believed in the sacred right of revolution, and he considered the late revolution was a good thing. But it might not be good if the Provisional Government introduced anarchy and despotism. Some persons were led by their philosophy to believe that a beneficent despotism was the best form of government, and he believed that members of this school of philosophy had seats in the Advisory Council. Continue reading

Congratulations Waikiki Aquarium, 110 years old! 1904 / 2014.

HOME OF THE FISHES IS OPENED

A Place to Learn and Enjoy for the Visitors.

AN EFFORT BY HONOLULU’S WEALTHY FOR THE BENEFIT OF EVERYONE.

On the Saturday of this past week, the Aquarium of Hawaii, which stands in Waikiki, makai of Kapiolani Park opened for viewing. This opening was not an opening for the general public, but it was for just those who were invited to come see. This Sunday is when it will be open to the public.

Earlier, it was reported in the columns of the Kilohana¹ that a home will be built where Hawaii’s fishes will be kept, and in the end, the report has come true as the building was entered by the invited guests and will be entered by Honolulu’s people on Sunday.

Many years ago, there was a thought to build an aquarium in Honolulu nei, and Dr. Dorn was the one to come up with the idea; however, because the Government held back some of the resources, this idea by the doctor was dropped and it slept quietly until it was revived by the Rapid Transit Company [Hui Kaauwila]. This idea was considered seriously by this group, when Mr. James Castle [Kimo Kakela] and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke stepped in and encouraged the effort.

Mr. James Castle gave a portion of the land of Kapiolani Park, which he held in lease, as a place to build this home. When Mr. C. M. Cooke and his wife joined in this effort, that is when the Rapid Transit Company realized that their dream that they were dreaming would come true, and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cooke graciously gave the money for the construction. Therefore, the Rapid Transit Company was left to collect Hawaii’s fishes for the aquarium, and that is how the aquarium here on Oahu came to be.

This is seen in the great lands all over the world, and its importance is recognized. One of the benefits is that knowledge is gained by those studying the life of fish, and this is taught at universities. And some thousands of people graduate, being educated in where various ocean fishes live, like whales, sharks, the fishes of the ocean floor, and outside of those, the small fishes of the sea shore.

At the aquarium of Hawaii mentioned above are the many fishes of Hawaii; the ocean fishes are separated from the fresh-water fishes, and according to the visitors who went to see this new place and who have seen the displays of the Foreign Lands, …

¹From the subtitle of the Kuokoa Newspaper: “Ke Kilohana Pookela no ka Lahui Hawaii” [The Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian Nation]

[Go check out the Waikiki Aquarium today, Saturday, 3/22/2014! The 110th anniversary celebration continues with fun for the entire family! $1.10 admission to the Waikiki Aquarium all day! Activities include: the Great Marine Chalk Art Draw and Kids Doodle Zone, entertainment by the UH Rainbow Marching Band, Rainbow Dancers, and other guests groups, a special performance of the musical “Honu by the Sea,” free giveaways (while supplies last), LEGO build area, samples from Pepsi, educational and entertaining activities and much more!]

(Kuokoa, 3/25/1904, p. 1) Continue reading

Queen Victoria letter to Sanford Dole, 1894.

Queen Victoria to President Dole.

At midday of this past Thursday, the President gave an audience in the Executive Building [Iolani Palace] for the Queen of Britain’s Commissioner and Consul General, Mr. A. G. S. Hawes, who handed over to him personally this important national greeting from the Royal one, Queen Victoria.

Victoria, by the grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen Defender of the Faith, Empress of India, and so forth, and so forth, and so forth.

To the President of the Republic of Hawaii, Sendeth Greeting!

Our Good Friend! We have received the letter which you addressed to us on the 7th day of July last, in which you informed us that you had been elected President of the Republic of Hawaii, in accordance with the constitution which was proclaimed on the 4th of that month. We thank you for this communication, and we request you to accept our congratulations on this distinguished mark of the confidence of your fellow citizens;and we offer you our best wishes for your health and welfare, and for the prosperity of the Republic over which you preside.

And so we commend you to the protection of the Almighty.

Given at Our Court at Balmoral the nineteenth day of September 1894, in the 58th year of our reign.

Your good friend,

(Signed by the Queen’s own hand.)

(Signed by the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ own hand.)

[The queen seems to have been led to believe that Dole had the support of “his fellow citizens”…]

(Kuokoa, 11/17/1894, p. 2)

Moiwahine Victoria ia Peresidena Dole.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXIII, Helu 46, Aoao 2.

Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads… 1895.

“LAW OF THE PADDLE BLOW.”
[“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI.”]

This above are the initial words of the very first law promulgated in the communities of Hawaii, and those words spoken by one in authority still remain. Here below is the the law in its entirety:

“MAMALAHOE KANAWAI—Let the old men go forth and lie upon the roads; let the old women go forth and lie upon the roads; let the children go forth and lie upon the roads.”

This first law was proclaimed by Paiea (Kamehameha I) after his head was struck by some fishermen at the seashore in Puna, Hawaii, because they mistakenly thought he was someone else. When his head was struck with the blow from a canoe paddle, the men fled, there being five of them; that was when Paiea rose, picked up a rock, and made to chase after them, however, his foot was caught in a rock crevice, and his chase was cut short. The rock in his hand fell, and there was no getting it back. And it was this disappointment which caused him to proclaim these famous and powerful words in our history. The place where Paiea’s foot was caught can be seen to this day.

Here, we take what is shown on pages 94 and 95 of “Ka Buke Lapaau me na Mea Pili Kaulana” which was published by Kamaki [Thomas P. Spencer]:¹

“Soon after this battle (Kepuwahaulaula), the fishermen who years earlier struck the head of Kamehameha with a paddle near the sea were brought before him by his officers. This shameful act of theirs was made known to Kamehameha face to face, for which his officers demanded that they be killed by stoning them to death.

“The aloha Kamehameha had for his fellow man was expressed for the first time in his famous pardon by announcing:

“‘Mamalahoe Kanawai: you are prisoners of war, but you are forgiven for unwittingly striking my head–I escaped, but nearly was in trouble.’

“Here, O Reader, do recognize–love for his fellow man was the cure² for which allowed for the release of these rebels of Puna by Kamehameha, and him not giving regard to the calls by his officers to put them to death. This is a fine comparison to President Dole of the Republic; he with his Executive Powers does not come close to a hundredth of the Kanawai Mamalahoe, in his treatment of the Hawaiian prisoners of the revolution of January 17, 1895 who continue to be imprisoned albeit the lahui are united in wanting them released. That was an uncivilized time when [the men] were triumphantly released by Kamehameha, and this is a knowledge and civilization, and yet Dole has not given clemency to the Hawaiian prisoners for the fame of his name and that of his Nation.”

Our elucidation of this famous story is not like that of Spencer’s, but the basis of his explanation of Kamehameha’s forgiving those who injured him, that is what we want to make clear at this time, so that true love of one’s fellow man is seen by them.

¹This book was republished in 2003 by Bishop Museum Press as: Buke ‘Oihana Lapa’au me na ‘Apu la’au Hawai’i (Book of Medical Practices and Hawaiian Prescriptions). See here for further description.

²”Laau lapaau” [medicinal cure] is the word chosen here because this story appears in a book of traditional medicinal practices.

(Makaainana, 11/25/1895, p. 4)

"MAMALAHOE KANAWAI."

Ka Makaainana, Buke IV—-Ano Hou. Helu 22, Aoao 4. Novemaba 25, 1895.

More on the missionaries, 1894.

Missionary Descendants Show Their Knowledge of Hula Ku’i.

In the Advertiser of 2/7/1894, was shown that at New Haven, United States of America, on the past 17th of January 1894, there was held a party to commemorate the anniversary of the government by the P. G. Those present were: J. R. Kauka [James Robert Judd?], G. S. Walakahauki [George S. Waterhouse], C. M. Kuke [C. Montague Cooke, Jr.?], W. D. Balauina [William D. Baldwin], A. M. Atherton, A. S. Knudsen, J. A. Waila [James Austin Wilder], H. A. Balauina [Harry A. Baldwin], and F. Hastings.

Before drinking to the delight at the Cabinet of Ministers of Cleveland, the young missionaries danced a hula ku’i to a hapa haole song. When the music started, the youths among them who knew how to hula ku’i jumped up immediately and danced and started to sway! …the mixed poi of Poniuailana goes the limit; there you go!—answer the call!—…¹

KE MELE HULA-KUI.

Kaulana mai nei o Mr. Cleveland,
Anti-Annexation no ia ia,
Ua olelo Cleveland i Mr. Willis,
E hele ana oe e Honolulu,
Aia hiki ana oe malaila,
E kipaku oe i ka P. G.
A komo oe Liliuokalani,
Maluna o kona throne!”
Ua hai mai Peresidena Dole,
E noho oe Malie”
Pilikia loa no Alapaki Willis,
E hoka no o Mr. Cleveland.

A MELE HULA KU’I

Famed is Mr. Cleveland,
An Anti-Annexationist is he,
Cleveland said to Mr. Willis,
[“]You are going to Honolulu,
When you get there,
Banish the P. G.
And place Liliuokalani,
Upon her throne!”
President Dole spoke,
[“]You just sit still.”
Albert Willis is perplexed,
Mr. Cleveland is thwarted.

The adeptness at the hula ku’i by these missionary descendants was seen first hand here in Honolulu, along with the girls carrying ukulele.

There you go! Mixed up is the cultivated taro with the wild! The white is smeared; the black gets the score.

What is this S. E. Bishop!—Look to New Haven! Your people’s hula ku’i dancer descendants were  gyrating away!

You missionaries, don’t be hypocritical.

¹…kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana; o—ia!—e, o!—…

[Does anyone have more information on the “Kuupau na ai hoowali o Poniuailana” phrase?]

(Nupepa Ka Oiaio, 2/9/1894, p. 3)

Hoike na Mamo Mikanele i ko lakou ike hula-kui.

Nupepa Ka Oiaio, Buke VI, Helu 6, Aoao 3. Feberuari 9, 1894.