Necker claimed for Hawaii, 1894.

THE JOURNEY OF THE IWALANI!

NECKER BECOMES HAWAII’S!

The Islands of the Hawaiian Archipelago!

In the afternoon of May 25, this town was all astir at the news that the steamship Iwalani was headed on a long expedition. At 5:20 of that evening, the Iwalani sailed on its mystifying mission. On board was J. A. King, Minister of the Interior, and the crew was increased by ten more sailors. Ka Leo¹ newspaper was much alarmed thinking that the Provisional Government was looking for a place to keep all of the royalists [anee alii]. The royalists proved this worthless piece of news by Ka Leo printing a letter that they found in some dung, but the people…

THE HAWAIIAN ARCHIPELAGO.

…of proper thinking, they were not anxious. The wonder of the people was highly escalated because the British warship Champion followed half an hour after the Iwalani left. And as is usual in Honolulu nei, news soon spoke of the warship chasing after the Iwalani. These senseless ideas were let go when the Iwalani returned on Tuesday evening, May 29.

From what was said by Captain Freeman of the Iwalani, they passed Nihoa in the evening of Saturday, May 26, and at 11 o’clock on the following morning, May 27, the anchor of the Iwalani was let down on the leeward side of Necker [Neka] Island, 41 hours sailing from Honolulu. The skiff was let down and Captain King, Captain Freeman, engineer Norton, along with seven sailors went on.

NECKER ISLAND.

This island is a heap of rocks, and is 260 feet tall. There is a steep cliff rising from the ground, and it was with great effort that they climbed up until a proper place to where Captain King stood a flagpole and the Hawaiian flag waved in the wind. This island was annexed to the Hawaiian nation, and this is the proclamation that Captain King read: Continue reading

Christmas tree at Iolani Palace, 1910.

CHRISTMAS TREE LADEN WITH PRESENTS

THE FOREIGN CHRISTMAS TREE

Children lined up before the Executive Building to Receive Presents.

The Visitors along with the Children were Drenched in the Falling Rain on that Morning.

Two years have past since the start of the giving of a Malihini Christmas Tree heavy with presents of all sorts to the indigent children, and this year it seems as if there was the most presents collected along with the most children, reaching more than about two thousand, but showers coming down when the presents were being handed out was problematic for the little children and the gifts as well, and many of the presents were damaged.

Within the falling rain nonetheless, the children remained standing in line until they received their gift, and looking at their expressions, the happiness upon getting their present outweighed the difficulties of the rain. Continue reading

Dogs and the Leprosy Colony, 1903.

DOGS TO BE TAKEN

The Board of Health [Papa Ola] released a new rule which was approved by Governor S. B. Dole, ordering each and every leprosy patient and kokua of the leprosy colony of Molokai, that they may not keep more than one dog. The supervisor will enforce these new rules of the Board of Health.

(Aloha Aina, 4/25/1903, p. 6)

HOPU IA NA ILIO

Ke Aloha Aina, Buke IX, Helu 17, Aoao 6. Aperila 25, 1903.

More on John K. Waiamau and others, 1893.

PERSONAL.

President Dole’s illness has been caused by an ulcerated tooth. He is now on the mend.

John K. Waiamau, the accomplished young architect is going to Chicago at the expense of his employer, C. B. Ripley to study architectural drawing.

Ornithologist Palmer returned on the Pele last evening from Makaweli, where he has been collecting birds for the British Museum.

(Hawaiian Star, 8/18/1893, p. 2)

PERSONAL.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume I, Number 122, Page 2. August 18, 1893.

Sanford B. Dole, the Congregationalists, and Annexation, 1902.

THE HAWAIIAN SITUATION.

On Monday evening, April 28 last, Governor Dole was the guest of the Congregational Club of Boston. Elsewhere in this issue will be found a sketch made by Dole of the Hawaiian situation. It is characteristic of the man. Having the full support of the Administration behind him he is not afraid to say in public what he has been thinking in private for many long years. Let us see and take up his points one by one.

Point No. 1.—”The monarchy was overthrown and annexation was accomplished for the sake of good government for the islands; that is, for their benefit.”—It is true! Annexation was accomplished, by a handful of Congregationalists because the reciprocity treaty between the United States and Hawaii was in imminent danger of being abrogated. The monarchy was overthrown, so as to save the $40 per ton duty on sugar. It was then as it is now for the Congregationalists:—Money before principle.

Point No. 2:—”We have given you everything we have by being annexed.”—That is, Sanford B. Dole, and his Congregationalist friends have given to the United States that which did not belong to them. With the help of an American cruiser, American marines and an American Minister, they have robbed the native Hawaiians of their country so as to enable a few Congregationalist planters to keep up receiving big dividends from their sugar stocks which would have been materially cut down had a $40 duty been imposed upon each ton of sugar. The Springfield Republican adds the following comment to Point No. 2: “But the second point that they have given us all they have is not at all consistent with his first point that they sought Annexation for the benefit of the Islands, and it shows that they are still trying to work the United States for the benefit of the Hawaiians.” Continue reading

Mafia? 1893.

AN AMERICAN MAFIA.

“The Queen never will be restored to the throne, for she will be shot within 24 hours, and every man who takes office under her will be shot also—we have men secretly sworn to do it.”

Such was the remark made to the writer by a brainless young sprig of the “citizens reserve,” such is the tenor of numerous open threats of the canaille composing the annexation club, the citizens reserve and the American league organizations that pretending to be patriotically American are in fact veritable nests of socialism, fenianism and mafia.

To their shame be it said that these mafias are organized under men calling themselves Americans, men who heretofore have been regarded as respectable and intelligent citizens: Hatch, Castle, Wilder, Jones, Smith, McGrew, Emerson, and so on, whose names will pass into history as knavish pirates in a plot to steal a nation and compel America to receive the stolen goods.

A recent article in the Holomua warned that a wave of insanity had struck Honolulu in accordance with a well known theory of cycles. The malady appears to be growing worse, for certain it is, that all the men and women concerned in the overthrow of the Queen, the terrorism and misgovernment of a P. G. military despotism, and the present display of hostilities against the United States, all act like people demented. Continue reading

The great protest of July 2, 1894.

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Five Thousand Loyalist Protest Against the So-Called Republic.

Without advertising, without preparations, a crowd of loyal citizens met yesterday on Palace Square, and then there did solemnly protest against the proclamation of a republic, not representing the people, not established for the benefit of the masses but virtually made for the sole benefit of the small and insignificant clique placed in power by J. L. Stevens and American troops in controversy of justice, honor, and popular will.

Over five thousand people gathered, among whom were all classes, all nationalities and all friends of popular government. The meeting was most orderly, and as Nawahi urged in opening the meeting, free from any undue demonstration, free from noise generally attached to a political meeting. Mr. J. O. Carter, one of the oldest and best known citizens in the country read the resolution, protesting against the so-called republic. Messrs. Bush, Nawahi and Kaulia spoke to the Hawaiians in most eloquent terns, and translated the resolution which was received with tremendous cheering by the Hawaiians. The following is the text of the resolution.

Be it resolved. That the Hui Aloha Aina and other patriotic leagues, together with the loyal subjects of the Hawaiian Kingdom, in mass meeting assembled, representing by far the greater majority of the legitimate voters of this country, do hereby most solemnly protest against the promulgation of a new Constitution, formed without the consent and participation of the people, and we also protest against changing the form of government from the one under which we have lived peacefully and prosperously for many years. And that we maintain that the will of the majority of the legitimate voters of Hawaii should be the supreme power of the land, as such power is so recognized and accepted in all civilized countries, and by all the enlightened governments of the world.

(Hawaii Holomua, 7/3/1894, p. 2)

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 154, Page 2. July 3, 1894.