The great protest of July 2, 1894.

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Five Thousand Loyalist Protest Against the So-Called Republic.

Without advertising, without preparations, a crowd of loyal citizens met yesterday on Palace Square, and then there did solemnly protest against the proclamation of a republic, not representing the people, not established for the benefit of the masses but virtually made for the sole benefit of the small and insignificant clique placed in power by J. L. Stevens and American troops in controversy of justice, honor, and popular will.

Over five thousand people gathered, among whom were all classes, all nationalities and all friends of popular government. The meeting was most orderly, and as Nawahi urged in opening the meeting, free from any undue demonstration, free from noise generally attached to a political meeting. Mr. J. O. Carter, one of the oldest and best known citizens in the country read the resolution, protesting against the so-called republic. Messrs. Bush, Nawahi and Kaulia spoke to the Hawaiians in most eloquent terns, and translated the resolution which was received with tremendous cheering by the Hawaiians. The following is the text of the resolution.

Be it resolved. That the Hui Aloha Aina and other patriotic leagues, together with the loyal subjects of the Hawaiian Kingdom, in mass meeting assembled, representing by far the greater majority of the legitimate voters of this country, do hereby most solemnly protest against the promulgation of a new Constitution, formed without the consent and participation of the people, and we also protest against changing the form of government from the one under which we have lived peacefully and prosperously for many years. And that we maintain that the will of the majority of the legitimate voters of Hawaii should be the supreme power of the land, as such power is so recognized and accepted in all civilized countries, and by all the enlightened governments of the world.

(Hawaii Holomua, 7/3/1894, p. 2)

A SOLEMN PROTEST!

Hawaii Holomua, Volume III, Number 154, Page 2. July 3, 1894.

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