Death of Z. P. K. Kalokuokamaile, 1942.

A Man Has Just Passed.

“A man!”

“What?”

“Has just passed!”

“WHO?”

“Z. P. Kalokuokamaile! He has gone on the road of no return; he has taken the path all must ake; he has grown weary of this worldly life; and his spirit has returned to the one who made all people; and his body has returned to the mother earth.

“Yes, one of the long-living men of Napoopoo, Hawaii has passed; and he is the last of the oldsters of that famed land at the base of the acclaimed cliff known as Kapalikapuokeoua. Z. K. Kalokuokamaile grew weary of this world at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Annie Keawe at 93 years and 4 months and a little more in age. The Heavenly Father had much aloha for this good man; he was just a few years away from reaching a century. He left this world in the afternoon of Tuesday, September 1, 1942.

His mind was strong when he grew weary; it was clear when conversing with him.

Mr. Z. P. Kalokuokamaile was born from the loins of Naili (m) and Kawaha (f) at Napoopoo, South Kona, Hawaii, on the 13th of March 1849, and he was 93 years four months and a little more in age.

He was educated at Lahainaluna School and graduated from there and made a living as a teacher at the school of Keei.

From his marriage, he had two children, they being Naili (m) who is living in Honolulu, and Mrs. Annie Keawe of Hilo, and he has just two grandchildren.

At a time in his life, he became a Sunday School principal, and a Sunday School teacher for the father’s class of the Napoopoo Church.

Z. P. Kaloku was a man who was in the class of experts at searching for the obscure information of the press of Ka Hoku o Hawaii. He was an expert at posing riddles [nane] as well as in the solving of nane from other experts such as “Pohakuopele,” Ka Naita Ilihune, Makaikiu Hene, and other highly skilled ones.

He was well known amongst the ones who answered nane by the name of Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua i ka Pali Kapu o Keoua.

He was a writer for the Hoku o Hawaii during the life of Rev. S. L. (Kiwini) Desha, Sr., and he was adept as a writer. Who would not be without knowledge who were taught in Hawaii’s schools in those days. How mournful is his passing.

He had good eyesight, and during his life, he didn’t read with glasses.

On the afternoon of the following Wednesday, his funeral was held in Haili Church by the Rev. Moses Moku, and his body was taken to rest in the cemetery of Homelani.

His toiling is over; his work here is over, and his spirit with the one who made all people.

O Kona of the sea of cloud banks in the calm of Ehu, you will not see again Kalokuokamaile for all times; he has gone on the path of no return. O People of Napoopoo, no more, no more will you see again your father, Z. P. Kaloku, for all times; you will no more hear his beckoning voice.

O Expert seekers of things obscure, you will no more see the name Kawaikaumaiikamakaokaopua; you will no more see his answers to newly published riddles; and no more will you see his solutions to riddles for all times. The golden chain of his life has been severed, for man’s life is a vapour that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. O Pohakuopele, here is your father; he has glided over the path of all men.

Ka Hoku o Hawaii joins in the family in mourning for him, for their loved one who left this earthly life.

MAY GOD LIGHTEN YOUR SORROW.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 9/9/1942, p. 2)

He Kanaka Ua Hala Iho Nei

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVII, Number 20, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 9, 1942.

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