Journal of Evelyn Desha and Stephen Desha Jr., 1943.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

The person who helps me in all sorts of chores at home is Nellie Kakutani. She is a pleasant girl and lively at work.

And these days what we are doing is cooking guava jelly [puhi kele kuawa]. The guava here in Kona is very ripe. There are two types of jelly we are making. One jelly is dark red, and the other is yellowish. The difference comes with the heat at which you cook it. If you want dark red, you cook with on medium heat. So you cook it for a long time. And should you want yellowish jelly, then you cook it on high heat. And you cook it for a short time.

There is a butter shortage, so this is advice to the women of the home; if you haven’t cooked your jelly, you should start these days, right.

On Thursday, the ninth of November, there was a meeting of the members of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] and some other members of the County of Hawaii and some citizens of Kona nei, at the meeting house of Central Kona Union Church that is under the care of Rev. Stephen Desha of Kealakekua. They discussed the Appropriations [Bila Haawina] of the County of Hawaii pertaining to matters here in Kona. They decided to set aside funds for schools, hospitals, and roads. This was one of the few times where the members of the Board of Supervisors met with the citizens of Kona to talk about the well-being of this district. Praise goes to the members of the Board of Supervisors and the other members of Hawaii County.

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There are many visitors here in Kona these days. Here with us these days are Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mahi, the daughter-in-law of our elder sister, Mrs. May Haae. This is the first time that Mrs. Mahi has come to Hawaii and to here in Kona. With them came their baby son, Mosely. We took them around sight seeing.

The other day we took the two of them to Kailua and Keauhou. Yesterday we took them to Napoopoo, to our home by the sea. Mr. Mahi is adept at spearfishing, and he caught some fish. My companion caught the sweet-eyed kole. The fish were fried and eaten for lunch. We went to seethe monument to Opukahaia at the cove of Kealakekua.

Today they went to see some of their friends here in Kona.

The women of Kona held a prayer meeting called “The Church Wide Day of Prayer.” This assembly was held at the Episcopal Church, Christ Church, of Kealakekua. The Japanese, Chinese, Hawaiians and Haole participated. After the meeting, a celebration was held, and everyone joined in at the U. S. O. Hall.

[This is a series that seems to continue after another called “Ko’u La” written by Evelyn Desha. I believe that “Ko Maua La: Na Kaimalino” is also written by her about her daily life with Stephen Langhern Desha, Jr.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/4/1943, p. 1)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 32, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 4, 1943.

It seems that Jack was not all work and no play, 1912.

Desha Elopes, Weds; Keeps Secret 2 Years

Jack Desha of Hawaii, Harvard’s star baseball player, marries girl of his choice despite opposition of stern parent. Two ceremonies held, and he becomes proud father before his classmates learn the story that he has long left the ranks of single men.

—Photo by Perkins.

Harvard Hears News When He Presents a Candidate for Class Baby

Jack Desha of Hilo and Harvard, famed as a football and baseball player, is a benedict. Further than this, he entered the ranks of married men two years ago by way of an elopement with the daughter of his landlord and was married on New Year’s Day, 1910. It may also be stated that Jack Desha has been a proud father since December 11, 1910, when Evelyn C. M. Desha came into the world.

Friends of Jack Desha in the Hawaiian Islands need not feel disappointed or grieved at the fact that the young athlete failed to confide in them, for it appears that the members of his own class at Harvard, that of 1912, knew nothing about it until Desha as a candidate for the class baby, to which position she was at once elected by the class. Continue reading