Real gentlemen from a hundred years ago, 1915.

THE WORDS OF A HAWAIIAN

A while ago while some Hawaiian Youths were in Washington and riding an electric car, some haole women boarded the car, and not one of haole men near where those haole women were gave their seat to any of the women. When the Keiki Hawaii saw these Ladies standing, that is when these Hawaiian Youths stood and gave their seats to these white women. The women accepted the kindness of the Hawaiians. These Hawaiian Boys then heard one of the Haole reading a newspaper ridicule them, saying:

“They are probably some foreigners, giving their seats to those women.” It was like he was calling them “country bumpkins.” When S. L. Desha Jr., heard these words of the Haole reading the paper, as he spoke disparagingly of this action by the Hawaiian Boys, that was when he spoke without hesitation to that Haole, perhaps because he was with his fellow Hawaiians. Continue reading

Journal of Evelyn Desha and Stephen Desha Jr., 1943.

Our Day

THE CALM SEAS OF KONA

The person who helps me in all sorts of chores at home is Nellie Kakutani. She is a pleasant girl and lively at work.

And these days what we are doing is cooking guava jelly [puhi kele kuawa]. The guava here in Kona is very ripe. There are two types of jelly we are making. One jelly is dark red, and the other is yellowish. The difference comes with the heat at which you cook it. If you want dark red, you cook with on medium heat. So you cook it for a long time. And should you want yellowish jelly, then you cook it on high heat. And you cook it for a short time.

There is a butter shortage, so this is advice to the women of the home; if you haven’t cooked your jelly, you should start these days, right.

On Thursday, the ninth of November, there was a meeting of the members of the Board of Supervisors [Papa Lunakiai] and some other members of the County of Hawaii and some citizens of Kona nei, at the meeting house of Central Kona Union Church that is under the care of Rev. Stephen Desha of Kealakekua. They discussed the Appropriations [Bila Haawina] of the County of Hawaii pertaining to matters here in Kona. They decided to set aside funds for schools, hospitals, and roads. This was one of the few times where the members of the Board of Supervisors met with the citizens of Kona to talk about the well-being of this district. Praise goes to the members of the Board of Supervisors and the other members of Hawaii County.

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There are many visitors here in Kona these days. Here with us these days are Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mahi, the daughter-in-law of our elder sister, Mrs. May Haae. This is the first time that Mrs. Mahi has come to Hawaii and to here in Kona. With them came their baby son, Mosely. We took them around sight seeing.

The other day we took the two of them to Kailua and Keauhou. Yesterday we took them to Napoopoo, to our home by the sea. Mr. Mahi is adept at spearfishing, and he caught some fish. My companion caught the sweet-eyed kole. The fish were fried and eaten for lunch. We went to seethe monument to Opukahaia at the cove of Kealakekua.

Today they went to see some of their friends here in Kona.

The women of Kona held a prayer meeting called “The Church Wide Day of Prayer.” This assembly was held at the Episcopal Church, Christ Church, of Kealakekua. The Japanese, Chinese, Hawaiians and Haole participated. After the meeting, a celebration was held, and everyone joined in at the U. S. O. Hall.

[This is a series that seems to continue after another called “Ko’u La” written by Evelyn Desha. I believe that “Ko Maua La: Na Kaimalino” is also written by her about her daily life with Stephen Langhern Desha, Jr.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 12/4/1943, p. 1)

Ko Maua La

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXVIII, Number 32, Aoao 1. Dekemaba 4, 1943.