Rosalia Tripp saved, 1866.

Nearly burned up by fire.—On Christmas night, last Tuesday, after the candles were lit to light the chapel, a flame of one of the candles began to burn the clothes of a girl of the Choir, her name being Rosalia Tripp. The fire did not put much effort into its work, when it was put out by someone who was standing there.

(Au Okoa, 12/31/1866, p. 2)

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Ke Au Okoa, Buke II, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 31, 1866.

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A fire to celebrate the birthday of Kamehameha V? 1868.

Commotion-Inciting Fire.—The fire bells of Honolulu rang out in the evening of this past Friday, and off went the firemen; come to find out, the fire was the work of Miss Bingham folk. The large fire that they set was purportedly to honor the birthday of the King. If this was done with good intentions, why were the members of the fire department not informed prior to this? We saw in the P. C. A. paper a clarification of their apology to the fire department; Continue reading

Curious report, 1868.

Alarm of Fire on Friday Evening.—Some young men, with more love of fun than discretion, made a bon-fire of some combustible materials in an open space makai of Kawaiahao. The bright light very naturally caused people in town to think there was a serious fire, and on the alarm being given, the Fire Department turned out with its usual promptitude, and ran towards the supposed conflagration, until it was ascertained to be a false alarm. As No. 2 was rushing along through Palace Walk with all speed on, the foreman, Mr. James McGuire, accidentally fell, and came near being run over. As it was, his trumpet was smashed under the wheels. Had he been killed, what regrets of these young men would have availed to compensate for the results of their thoughtlessness. Our fireman, or at least the heads of the department, should always be notified beforehand of any such bonfire demonstration, otherwise we may be some night in the position of the boy that cried “wolf! wolf!” when there was no wolf, and when the danger really came, nobody would pay any attention to his cries for help.

(Hawaiian Gazette, 12/16/1868, p. 3)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume IV, Number 48, Page 3. December 16, 1868.

Kalakaua, the firemen’s king! 1875.

Burning of the Ship Emerald.—At half-past two o’clock on Monday morning an alarm of fire was sounded by the watchmen in the bell-tower, which proved to be for the ship Emerald, at anchor in the roadstead. Fire brigades, about two hundred officers and men, were immediately dispatched from the Pensacola in port, which took off two or three of the patent fire extinguishers. The city firemen also turned out promptly, with their machines, hose carts and ladders, ready to assist whenever ordered. At early dawn, the ship was towed into the harbor alongside the steamboat wharf, where the firemen and engines could get access to her. The fire was first discovered soon after midnight, but when the naval force reached the ship the hole was so full of smoke that the fire extinguishers could could not be successfully applied, and little could be done towards checking the fire until the engines could be brought to bear on it. From six oʻclock, the firemen, mariners and citizens worked faithfully till after noon, when the fire was apparently subdued, and the firemen returned home. Continue reading

The latest from Hilo, 1898.

THE NEWS FROM NORTH HILO.

Mr. Editor of the Greatest Prize of the Hawaiian People:

Aloha oe:—Please include this bit of news from here in North Hilo.

On the first of this month, Pakele, Iaukea, Laika, Kalei, and Lahapa went to go pick opihi on the shore of Waipunalei, and upon their return, they climbed up the pali. Lahapa was the first to climb up and the rest followed. When they reached the midpoint up the pali, a rocked dislodged and hit Lapaha square on the chest and he rolled down the pali, and because of the love of God, he was caught on a pandanus tree that was burned earlier in a fire. It was 40 feet high from where he tumbled from to where he was caught. Therefore, O my sisters and brothers and younger siblings, don’t go pick opihi again and return upland of the pali, lest you end up dying. Continue reading

Kalihi fire, 1889.

The glowing fire on the Kalihi mountains Thursday night Feb. 21, was caused by workmen burning off the grass on the site of the new reservoir in the upper Nuuanu Valley. The fire could easily have been controlled in the first instance. As it was, it was allowed to run up a narrow ridge, and thence to spread along the flanks of the mountain until it became an extensive conflagration, destroying many vigorous young koa trees and persistently working itself down into the valley. On Friday morning, two teachers and about twenty of the largest boys in the Kamehameha School went up to the fire and after a vigorous battling with the dense smoke succeeded in hemming in the fire, and finally subdued it. The utmost care in such a dry season should be used in preventing the setting, much more the spreading, of fire in the grass and bushes above Honolulu. A few such fires would make it unnecessary to build extra reservoirs.

(Handicraft, 2/1889, p. 3)

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Handicraft, Volume I, Number 2, Page 3. February 1889.

The perils of fire in old Hawaii, 1848.

CONSUMED IN FIRE.

Kapalama, July 7, 1848.

O Elele Hawaii, aloha oe. Tell the people and the other Islands of this Nation of the great devastation that happened here in Honolulu last night.

On the 6th of July, at perhaps 1 o’clock at night, three houses went up in flames at the North East corner of town, near the North side of Kaumakapili Church [not where it is located now]. One adobe house and two pili grass houses. The adobe house belonged to Kahehenanui, a member of the church and a widower. One of the pili houses belonged to Kauhema, a church member, and that new pili house was only completed some months ago. The other pili house belonged to Lio and was about three years old.

The fire started at the new pili house of Kauhema on the south side of the structure in the lanai. A candle was burning there and the flame caught on to the wall of the lanai. The fire leaped from the house of Kauhema and caught the adobe house of Kahehenanui on fire, and then the fire jumped to the house of Lio, and those houses were all consumed leaving the house of Uilani located makai of those houses to escape from being burned down; the Church escaped the fire as well. Continue reading