Looking back to the Hawaiian football champions of 1895, 1926.

WINNERS OF FIRST MAINLAND — ISLAND GRID TILT

Here is the Honolulu team, island champions and victors over the Navy champs from Philadelphia. Top row, standing, left to right—Billie Cornwell, Chris Holt, Louis Singer. Continue reading

Publishing a newspaper wasn’t easy! 1868.

KE ALAULA.

Have you not thought about, O People who frequently read this newspaper, with amazement at the beauty of your monthly paper, while asking yourself, “Who publishes this paper? and who puts in effort into writing down the ideas, and into the printing, and into the distributing?” Maybe you just thought they just appear; no, consider the amount of work and expense it takes to prepare this thing which gives you enjoyment, and be educated. Just grabbing it and quickly looking at the illustrations, reading quickly through the short ideas, and then discarding it in a corner, or perhaps tearing it apart at once as a wrapper for some fish, or to wrap something else. Maybe you have complaints about not receiving it more frequently, every week; and you call it a slow paper—one publication per month. Continue reading

He Aupuni Palapala project’s new blog page, 2021.

It seems the newspaper project He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers at Bishop Museum started a blog page. Let’s keep an eye out for future posts from them!

He Aupuni Palapala blog page can be found by clicking this image:

What a disappointment, 1867.

[Found under: “Hunahuna Huikau.”]

It will not be seen after all.—We reported in Issue 4 of our Newspaper, “the moon will be eclipsed o n the 13th of September, and it will be seen here in Hawaii.” The Famous School Teacher of Punahou proclaimed to us that the moon will indeed be eclipsed on that day, Continue reading

A boy born on La Hoihoi Ea and why newspapers are better than books, 1865.

Misprint.

O Kuokoaa [We are all human.] Newspaper; Aloha oe:—In Issue 33 of the Kuokoa, in the births section, the date and place of birth of our child was misprinted. It was printed this way: “July 1, at North Kohala” that is not correct, this is what is right. July 31, at Niumalu, Kauai, born was Kalahoihoiea Hapuku (m). Continue reading

Death of Pilipo Naone, John K. Naone’s father, 1882.

PILIPO NAONE.

On the 16th of February past, Naone let out his last breath, and the man returned to his Lord whom he loved greatly, for whom he was a servant in many good works; Naone died at eighty or so years old. He was born up in Pauoa. His father was Mahi and his  mother was Hama [?? it is hard to read]; his parents were from Kauai and then resided in Pauoa; these parents had three children: Pokaakua, along with P. Naone and D. Lima; Pokaakua and Lima died ealier, and only Naone lived until old age, living for more than 80 years. Continue reading

Repost of the announcement attributed to Mrs. Maule of Waihee, 1893.

Mistaken.—I am the one whose name appears below, I show myself before the public, that I signed the aloha aina paper was not right; being that I signed my name without being explained what makes aloha aina right. And being that it was made clear to me the good and the benefits of annexation, with it right and correct in my understanding. Continue reading

“Kuhihewa,” Kuokoa, 5/6/1893, p. 2.

[This is the article referred to by Mrs. Maule in the previous post. It is hard to read because the right side of the page this appears on fell into shadow because of the binding of the newspaper into a book. Interestingly, there is another similar article that appears right above this one that is attributed to another person from Waihee, S. Hookano.]

(Kuokoa, 5/6/1893, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXXII, Helu 18, Aoao 2. Mei 6, 1893.