The beginnings of Punahou School, 1841.

SCHOOLHOUSE FOR THE MISSIONARIES, AT KA PUNAHOU.

The rooms are explained by the numbers,

1, a library; 2, 3, 4, 5, for the teachers; 6, kitchen; 7, 8, 9, 10, for the students; 11, 12, for Mi. Mika [?] the woman helper; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, for the students; 18, cafeteria; 19, school room; 20, room for entertaining guests; 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 for the students. A, E, wide areas to play.

This will not be completed quickly at this time; the places with solid lines are being constructed, and the areas surrounded by dashes are left to complete at a later date. The most tiny rooms are solitary rooms.

[Earlier, i posted a diagram of the layout of the Chiefs’ Children’s School. Here from about the same time is the school for missionary children at Kapunahou, the precursor to today’s Punahou School.

The school began instruction on July 11, 1842, with 5 boarders and 12 day schoolers.]

(Nonanona, 11/23/1841, p. 44)

KA HALE KULA NO NA MISIONARI, AIA MA KA PUNAHOU.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 1, Pepa 11, Aoao 44. Novemaba 23, 1841.

Charles Auld, Hula, and Hawaiian Civic Club of Hilo, 1941.

Hawaiian Civic Club

CHAS. AULD

Charles H. (Moa) Auld has been chosen as the new president of the Hawaiian Civic Club [hui Kiwila Hawaii] of Hilo nei, one of the important youths here in Hilo of Hawaiian ancestry.

He was born in Honolulu, and was employed as an inspector of insects in the insects division of the department of agriculture and forestry [papa mahiai ame ululaau], in which he was employed for 10 years. He was educated at the Kamehameha Schools and at Punahou, and he graduated from Punahou in 1926. Thereafter he attended the University of Hawaii. In each of these schools he played football [kinipopo peku wawae].

He is a brother also of Aggie Auld, and expert in Hawaiian hula, and Mr. Auld himself is adept at it as well.

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/19/1941, p. 1)

Ka Hui Kiwila Hawaii

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume XXXV, Number 47, Aoao 1. Malaki 19, 1941.

Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett, Kauai boy, becomes a doctor, 1914.

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

A. H. Hanchett who is a Lihue boy, born in a house on the site of the present bowling alley, will graduate from the medical department of Harvard at the end of this month and will, on July 1, enter upon his duties as interne of a great hospital at Providence, R. I. He stood an examination, with 56 others, for that place and came out first best.

Young Hanchett’s father still lives on Kauai, at Waimea; and he is a half brother of W. O. Crowell, of Waimea. Prior to leaving the Islands, he graduated from both Kamehameha school and Oahu College. He next took a four-years course in Harvard, graduating A. B.; after which he took up the medical course, which he is now about to complete.

It is Dr. Hanchett’s hope and present intention to return to the Islands as soon as his two-year term with the Providence hospital is completed.

(Garden Island, 6/9/1914, p. 2)

ANOTHER KAUAI BOY MAKES GOOD

The Garden Island, Volume 10, Number 22, Page 2. June 9, 1914.

A. Kaumu Hanchett studying at Harvard, 1914.

HAWAII IS PROUD OF THIS NATIVE HAWAIIAN

At the Medical School of Harvard University, a Hawaiian named A. Kaumu Hanchett is learning Medicine; in an examination of the medical students in Boston, in order to enter one of the Hospitals of the City, and from amongst a 100 students, the Hawaiian boy ranked 3rd, and because this Hawaiian Boy wanted to once again test his competence, his Medical abilities were tested once again at a big Hospital in Providence in the State of Rhode Island, and what was revealed in that examination was that amongst 50  students who took the test, to the Hawaii boy went “Number One.” He is a brother [hoahanau] of the Deputy Sheriff [Crowell] of the District of Waimea on Kauai, and he was a Classmate of the children of S. L. Desha at Kamehameha School and Punahou School, and he entered Harvard University with a son of Desha’s. This Hawaiian boy will graduate in this coming June, and will intern for two years at one of the Famous Hospitals of America to advance his abilities in the medical field, and at the completion of his stay at the  Hospital, then he will select where he will practice his calling.

We hope that he will come back to Hawaii nei to practice this greatest of occupations in which he trained, and be the first Hawaiian to practice medicine in here in Hawaii.

[On page 295 of the Harvard Alumni Directory for 1910, you will find Alsoberry Kaumu Hanchett [c 1907–10, A.B. 1911(10).] Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 5/21/1914, p. 2)

HAAHEO O HAWAII I KEIA OIWI HAWAII

Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 8, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Mei 21, 1914.

Words of praise for C. R. Bishop on today, his birthday, 1896.

MEMORIALS.

….¹

There are many kinds of memorials [kia hoomanao] to remember people by. A person is remembered for his deeds, in memorials built as pillars and monuments, in reminiscences, and preserved in the hearts of the many. Famous deeds of people are remembered with aloha for the good, and with scorn for the bad.

Queen Liliuokalani’s beloved efforts stand today as the Hui Hoonaauao i na Opio [Liliuokalani Educational Society].

The epitome of great deeds of these past days was done by a haole who lived here as a malihini and married one of the Princesses amongst the royal youth. Charles R. Bishop built the Kamehameha Schools, the memorial for his wife, the Alii Pauahi Bishop; and by this act of commemoration, a memorial now stands for all of the Kamehamehas, and it is impossible to forget their name.

 In the days when this haole friend was living here in Hawaii, he was often criticized for his stinginess and defiance by Hawaiian and haole alike, but he paid no care to this criticism. He continued with his work, ate healthily, [illegible digital image], until he was a rich man; but in all the criticism for him, there is no way that it could be said that he was a scoundrel or that he cheated someone; and this says a lot for his uprighteousness.

Likewise with his charity work, he acted with maturity and kindness without end in his steadfast support for the benefit of this lahui. In giving, he was not frivolous in his giving, but gave wisely. He donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Punahou College and to the Kamehameha Schools, from his own estate and from that of his wife’s; and from his own, also benefited were the Boarding School for  Boys and Girls. How wondrous is God in his passing down the great entire wealth of the Kamehamehas from one to another until it all came down to Keelikolani and then to Pauahi, the grandchildren of the first born of Kamehameha Nai Aupuni; and it was the last of the two, the one most knowledgeable of them all, as measured by their final deeds, which she created with her husband as a memorial for all of the Kamehamehas. This man was of a great mind in his carrying out meticulously this work which he and his wife discussed between themselves, without misappropriating a single parcel of land included in the estate of his wife, but instead he was conscientious and included his own estate. When put together with all the other beloved deeds by everyone in Hawaii nei, this is measured as the most wise of them all, the height and breadth of its foundation will go on and bear forth much benefits for this lahui. There is but yet one thing to complete and to perfect the building of this memorial to the Kamehamehas, that being the righteousness of God’s words, the basis upon which the good and the blessings of the lahui will continue.

But Bishop’s help for our people is not done in his continued assistance to the memorial to the Kamehamehas and their foster children [keiki hookama] in the covenant of marriage of Charles R. Bishop.

¹The first paragraph was left out because it was somewhat irrelevant to this particular post, and was commentary on J. Kekipi and the Christian Science [Hoomana Karistiano Naauao] faith.

(Oiaio, 2/21/1896, p. 2)

NA KIA HOOMANAO.

Ka Oiaio Puka La, Buke I, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Feberuari 21, 1896.

Marriage announcement outside of the Vital Statistics Column, 1912.

BOUND WITH THE THREE-STRAND CORD OF TRUE LOVE

Within the Anglican Church of St. Andrew’s, on this past Saturday evening, the youths, Miss Annabel Low and Albert Ruddle were joined together by the Rev. Leopold Kroll. The bride was donned with a white dress and a sheer veil, and atop her head was a lei of orange blossoms. She held a bouquet of flowers in her hand as seen in all marriage ceremonies, and she held a book of prayers in her hand. It was her father, Eben Low, who gave her into the care of her new parent, her husband. Misses Glorinda and Laura Low were the bride’s maids, and they held in their hands, bouquets of lavender roses. The best man was Mr. Kinegal, and the gentlemen in charge of hospitality were Stillman and Percy Deverill.

Miss Annabel Low who married Ruddle is the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Low of this town. She was a student who graduated from the College of Kapunahou [Punahou] three years ago, and after some time in the teachers’ school, she was appointed as a teacher at a school on Hawaii Island, where she first met this man whom she wed, Mr. Ruddle, who is employed in a high position at the volcano. They will be returning to the Kanilehua of Hilo on Wednesday’s Mauna Kea where they will make their permanent home from here forth.

(Kuokoa, 7/12/1912, p. 6)

AWAIAULUIA ME KE KAULA KAAKOLU A KE ALOHA OIAIO

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLVIII, Helu 28, Aoao 6. Iulai 12, 1912.

More on Transit of Venus, 1874.

The Day to Watch the Stars.

(Written for the Kuokoa)

The afternoon of this past Tuesday of this week, December 8th, was the day when Astronomers from times past and of these times believed that Venus [Hokuloa] would pass in front of the Sun, and it indeed did happen.

The Sun came out that morning shinning nicely, and its rays continued to shine forth with clarity until the second when Hokuloa’s was seen beginning to peep over at the edge of the sun. The heavens were clear and the floating clouds were banished away, with just one seen, the thick, black cloud surrounding the heavens.

Here are the places in Honolulu set aside by the people wanting to view the appearance of Hokuloa as it passed by: Honuakaha in Honolulu, the actual base of the Astronomers; the Government Surveying Office in the Government Building Aliiolani, for the Government Surveyor Laiana [C. J. Lyons]; the Labor Office, for David N. Flitner; Kapunahou [Punahou School], for the head of the Government Surveyors, W. D. Alekanedero [W. D. Alexander]; at Pawaa, for the Deputy Harbor Master of Honolulu, Captain Daniela [Daniel] Smith. And for the multitudes who just wanted a glimpse, they grabbed real telescopes and looked straight at the sun; and for those without telescopes, they grabbed shards of glass and placed them over candles until black, and then looked and could see.

From the base of the British Astronomers at Honuakaha, it was very calm, there were no one allowed entrance, there was no talking, no whispering, and nothing that would cause excitement was desired; a battalion of soldiers was sent to the observation area to guard their peace. The Astronomer Boys put their all into their work for which they were sent by the government at great expense. Not one of them has any complaints about Hawaii for they were provided and blessed with a totally clear sky, and perhaps we would not be mistaken to say that these astronomers were very lucky for getting this good day for which they will not forget Hawaii.

And by the kindness of the British Astronomers in Honolulu, we have these times below from various telescopes the Astronomers and others away from different places.

When Hokuloa was seen barely at the edge of the Sun, here are the different times of the British Astronomers:

Tupman, (Head Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 7 [min.], 1 [sec.]

Noble, (Assistant Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 7 [min.], 3 [sec.]

When Hokuloa began to clearly move into the face of the Sun, here are the various times from the Astronomers of Britain and those people from here:

Tupman, (Head Astronomer.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 56 [sec.]

Noble, (Assistant.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54½ [sec.]

D. Smith (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54 [sec.]

C. J. Lyons (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 54 [sec.]

D. N. Flitner (Of Hawaii.) 3 [hr.], 35 [min.], 58 [sec.]

The times seen by the last three were not taken into account by the Astronomers. However, there was not much difference between the times seen by the British Astronomers and our people keeping time. But it was surely a nice day for observing.

The slides taken were not as great as was hoped for, but they are indeed of much value.

(Kuokoa, 12/12/1874, p. 2)

Ka la Kilo Hoku.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 50, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 12, 1874.

Another Wooden Kii found, 1868.

Akua Kii from Kalia.

Most of the people reading Ke Alaula have not seen an akua kii, but a small fraction have seen one, and some of you saw this image that is shown here in this issue. Last year, this god idol was found by the Honorable M. Kekuanaoa on the banks of a fish pond at Kalia in Paalaa Uka in Waialua. That large piece of wood was set down and covered with soil near the sluice gate of that large fish pond. When that big piece of wood was unearthed, lo and behold, it was a carved god. It was brought to Honolulu nei, and through the goodwill of the Alii Elder who owns Kalia fishpond, that kii was given to the college of Kapunahou [Punahou], and there it stands in the exhibition room of curiosities at Kapunahou. When some of you go to visit Kapunahou, ask the children there about the kii from Waialua, and it will be shown to you where it stands.

This kii was probably thrown into the pond of Kalia in the year 1819; that is the year when there was the kii of Hawaii nei were greatly abandoned. Some of them were burnt in fire and some were thrown into the sea.

These ohia wood images were worshiped by previous generations. The kupuna of the educated children of Waialua Sunday School were probably those that knelt down and worshiped this piece of wood.

How astonishing are the actions of the people of all of the pagan lands, who worship idols that are carved or molded by their own hands. That is how all lands are where the word of God has not reached.

Pieces of wood, fragments of rock, chunks of silver, chunks of metal, or perhaps chunks of iron turned into images—those are the gods cared for by millions of people, in heiau, houses of god, mountains, caves, banks of rivers, and in forests; they worship before them thinking that from these gods come well being, wealth, and life in body and spirit.

Here also is a picture of a Hindu man worshiping his godly image; it is a snake carved into a rock.

This is something that pains the heart to see the darkness and trouble of those that don’t know of the God the Savior, the one who came down to save all man. Because they don’t know him, they seek salvation from rocks and pieces of wood and from actions that hurt their very own bodies. When you pray, “Thy kingdom come,” remember the pagans so that the light reaches them quickly.

[Could this Akua Kii be the one now at the Bishop Museum which was found in Waialua and presented to Punahou?]

(Alaula, 1/1868, p. 39)

KE AKUA KII O KALIA.

Ke Alaula, Buke II, Helu 10, Aoao 39. Ianuari, 1868.