News from the Marquesas, 1861.

HOKUAO.

In this issue, there is a letter from Rev. J. Kekela speaking of the difficulties of Paulo Kapohaku, at Heteani, pertaining to his house house burning; and the difficulties of Rev. S. Kauwealoha at Hanatekuua, pertaining to the abuse of the pagans [pegana] to the locals there; their belongings were stolen and thereafter they [the pegans] tore down S. Kauwealoha’s house and took all his belongings from within.

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Zakaria Hapuku and Hana Ihuanu first make their way to the Marquesas, 1861.

Hokuao sets sail.

On Friday, at 5 o’clock in the evening, the fine missionary ship set sail. It was made to sail quickly to take with it goods for the Hawaiian missionaries living in Fatuhiva, because of their difficulties faced with the wars of those people who are fond of revolts. When it sailed, the Hoolua wind blew a little stronger, Continue reading

Hawaiians in the Marquesas Islands, 2002.

Our Honolulu

By Bob Krauss

Letters tell of forgotten Hawaiians

HIVA OA, Marquesas Islands—At Atuona, a tattooed Marquesas wearing a “Aranui Crew” tank-top pointed from the cargo deck down the pier and shouted, “Hawaiian.”

We walked over to a medium-sized man beside a pickup loaded with copra andshook hands with James Kekela. He is the descendant and namesake of a Hawaiian missionary to the Marquesas who was honored by President Abraham Lincoln for saving an American sailor from the cannibal pot. Continue reading

Zakaria Hapuku writes from Atuona, Hiva Oa, 1865.

From Z. Hapuku.

Atuona, Hivaoa,
Nov. 25, 1865.

Rev. L. H. Gulick, Aloha oe:—Because the skiff of the haole came to purchase food at our valley, therefore I am placing this letter of Aloha to you, and all the teachers from Hawaii to Kauai, and the churches of God. Continue reading

Hula graduation [uniki] in Kahakuloa, Maui, 1875.

[Found under: “NO KE KALANA O KAHAKULOA A ME KONA MAU HIOHIONA.”]

Mixed-up news. On this 12th of June, there was a feast loudly given for a uniki for the hula uliuli, under the leadership of a youth, William Kamalahea; he is from the land of the Kilioopu wind, and he taught some from this District the hula uliuli, Continue reading

The first Kamehameha Day, 1872.

BY AUTHORITY.

Tuesday, the 11th inst., the Commemoration Day of Kamehameha I., will be observed as a Public Holiday, and all Government Offices will be closed.

Ferd. W. Hutchison,
Minister of the Interior.

Interior Office, June 4, 1872

(Hawaiian Gazette, 6/5/1872, p. 2)

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Hawaiian Gazette, Volume VIII, Number 21, Page 2. June 5, 1872.