Too much news today, 1880.

Knowledge Seeking Youths.

We received letters from the youths who traveled in search of knowledge. They are in the city of Cincinnati, State of Ohio, on the past 9th to the 16th of September. They tell of how their travels are going well, the beauty of everything, and their joy and that they are full of hope. We want to tell everything in full pertaining to these Hawaiian youths, but our paper is full, therefore wait for another when we receive letters from them again.

[These youths are Robert Wilcox, James Booth, and William Boyd.]

(Elele Poakolu, 10/6/1880, p. 5)

Ka Elele Poakolu, Buke I, Helu 5, Aoao 5. Okatoba 6, 1880.

Death of Waikohu, 1854.

A SUDDEN DEATH!!

On the 13th of September, a man named Waikohu died, at Maemae, Honolulu, Oahu; he died suddenly and intestate. This is why he died: he went to plant banana shoots on the sides of the taro loʻi, he fell in the taro patch, and someone saw him in the loʻi and saw that he was dead; his face and mouth were covered with mud from the loʻi, and men came and fetched him and carried him to the house.

O All you reading this in the Elele Hawaii newspaper, let us consider the consequences of this death. Our life is but vapor, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away, so says the Holy Scripture.

Aloha to you all. S. Kanakaole,
Kawaiahao, Sep. 14, 1854.

(Elele Hawaii, 10/1/1854, p. 59)

Ka Elele Hawaii, Buke 9, Pepa 15, Aoao 59. Okatoba 1, 1854.

Honolulu, aka Na Lani Ehiku, 1886.

[Found under: “Kela me Keia.”]

We hear that the name of a new daily appearing today is Honolulu. It has four pages and sixteen columns. Another name we hear for it is Na Lani Ehiku.

[Have you seen any issue of this newspaper?]

(Kuokoa, 10/16/1886, p. 3)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XXV, Helu 42, Aoao 3. Okatoba 16, 1886.

Kamehameha V’s Cabinet, 1872.

The True Ministers.—It pleased his Majesty on the 10th of September, to appoint those below as ministers of his nation:

Ferdinand W. Hutchison, Minister of Interior.
Stephen H. Phillips, Attorney General.
Robert Sterling, Minister of Finance.

The positions of Foreign Affairs and War are unfilled. But for now, their duties are given to His Ex. F. W. Hutchison to perform until the positions are filled.

(Kuokoa, 9/14/1872, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XI, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 14, 1872.

On the new Lahainaluna buildings, 1905.

Pertaining to Lahainaluna.

The school these days is not of that stature of days past, in its functions, and the condition of the dorms, and where they are to be taught.

The school this day, [something here seems to be missing], like something the former principal [Alatau Tamchiboulac Atkinson] stated in his speech on the day the opening of the buildings, “Lahainaluna school is the college for the poor.”

Those words are true, and it is still so today.

These are beautiful buildings, and the rooms are supplied with beds and pillows; the children are to supply a pillowcase, and sheets, and a blanket to sleep with; they have no need to worry about a mosquito net, for each room is furnished with metal mosquito screening, and the lights are electric.

The school begins on Monday, the 4th of September, 1905, and it is desired that the students arrive earlier than that, and if some come late, they will be left without a room.

So too with the new students, arrive before the beginning of school to receive a room. Students from 14 years old and up are wanted.

The Principal,
C. A. McDonald.
Lahainaluna School, July 28, 1905.

(Kuokoa, 8/11/1905, p. 5)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XLIII, Helu 32, Aoao 5. Augate 11, 1905.

John Wind enrolls into Wailuku Theological School, 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

A foreigner learning to become a pastor.—In a letter secretly received by one of us, the writer said that an Indian enrolled in the Wailuku Theological School, and that he is a stranger. His name is Ioane Makani. We have admiration for the great desire of this stranger to gain knowledge of the occupation of a pastor, and it would appear that he will most definitely return to teach his Indian People who live wild in the forests of America.

[John Wind is reported to have attended Royal School. And from there it seems he was admitted to the preparatory department of Oahu College, as per a PCA 8/26/1858, p. 2 article.]

(Kuokoa, 7/7/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 7, 1866.

Kapiolani, the Heroine of Hawaii, 1866.

[Found under: “HUNAHUNA MEA HOU O HAWAII NEI.”]

Story of Kapiolani.—Anesona [Rufus Anderson] wrote this story, and it was published in English, and a copy of this story was acquired by us. Through this we can see Anesona’s aloha for us, taking up his time with this endeavor.

[Kapiolani, the Heroine of Hawaii; or, A Triumph of Grace at the Sandwich Islands. by Rufus Anderson, Charles Scribner & Co., New York, 1866.]

(Kuokoa, 7/7/1866, p. 2)

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke V, Helu 27, Aoao 2. Iulai 7, 1866.

Henry Grube Marchant, 1893.

Henry Grube is heading back to the land of his birth. He was sent to increase his knowledge in engraving. And it seems that next month, October, is when it is believed that he will return home.

[Henry Grube Marchant was one of the youths sent abroad to Boston to learn engraving as part of King Kalakaua’s Education of Hawaiian Youths in Foreign Countries.]

(Lei Momi, 8/28/1893, p. 3)

Ka Lei Momi, Buke I, Helu 4, Aoao 3. Augate 28, 1893.