Reminiscences of the Hui Kawaihau, 1916.

THE HUI KAWAIHAU

There were several unusually interesting papers read at the last meeting of the Kauai Historical Society. Among them was one by Judge Charles S. Dole on the above subject which was as follows:

In the years from 1877 to 1881 the Hui Kawaihau, an organization of certain prominent Hawaiians and their friends, was one of the leading communities of the eastern side of the island of Kauai.

They were a body of men—most of whom came from Honolulu, with their families, where many of them were high officers in the Government—who went to Kapaa under the patronage of King Kalakaua, whose reign had then lasted for several years, for the purpose of establishing an association of congenial and intelligent farmers on the fertile cane lands at Kapahi, above Kapaa, in the year 1877.

The Hui Kawaihau was originally a choral society, of fifteen members, with social rather than business aims, and was first organized by Prince Leleiohoku, the Heir Apparent to the throne, in the year 1876—just before King Kalakaua’s coronation day, which was February 12th of that year.

The name “Kawaihau” (meaning “ice-water”) was originally derived as the nick-name of a lady residing in Honolulu at that time, a white woman, who was a friend of the King, but who did not court some of his royal favors and in the matter of liquid refreshment would drink only pure ice-water, in preference to the fiery gin which was usually dispensed from His Majesty’s sideboard. This choice of the lady was not understood by certain members of the royal court, and in derision they gave her the title “Ka Wahine o Kawaihau” (“The Lady of the Icewater”), and she became commonly known by the shorter appellation of “Kawaihau.”

Prince Leleiohoku died,  however, in April of the following year, 1877, at Iolani Palace, and the choral society would doubtless have disbanded but that King Kalakaua decided that it might be a good opportunity to establish some of his royal retainers—upon whom the dissipating court life was beginning to pall, or rather, perhaps, was beginning to produce disastrous results—in the beautiful climate and fertile lands of the district above the village of Kapaa, on the eastern coast of Kauai.

Another reason for the royal strategem was said to be that, although many of the prospective farmers were intelligent and industrious men, there were quite a number of them who were courtiers and hangers-on at Kalakaua’s palace, whom the King was glad to establish on another island—distant from Honolulu and the charms and temptations of court life.

So the Hui was reorganized, in the month of June, 1877, and among the twelve members who were its charter members are the well known names of King Kalakaua, Governor Dominis, the King’s brother-in-law; Colonel George W. Macfarlane, one of the leaders in the court circles of that day; Captain James Makee, who had often entertained the members of the Royal family at his beautiful residence at Ulupalakua, on the island of Maui; Governor John M. Kapena, of the island of Oahu; J. S. Walker and C. H. Judd, two men prominent in the court and government communities of Honolulu; and Koakanu, a high chief of Koloa, on Kauai.

These twelve organizers were the ones who set in motion the wheels of business of the Hui o Kawaihau, in the year 1877, their first important official act being to sign a contract with the resident members of the Hui, thirty-two in number, for the cultivation of the lands of Kapaa, on Kauai, to sugar cane.

Of the thirty-two original resident members of the Hui there are but seven living, so far as is known, these being: Judge James H. K. Kaiwi, of Lihue, who is with us tonight, a member of this Society, and is the sole member of the Hui Kawaihau left on the island of Kauai; Edward K. Lilikalani, of Honolulu; Frank K. Archer (also known as Kelinohopono), of Pearl City, Oahu; Ekela Mahuka, of Honolulu; John Wallace, of Honolulu; James Hauola Makekau, of Lahaina, Maui; and the Reverend Isaac Iaea, of Kaluaaha, on the island of Molokai. Besides these there are four widows of the original members of the Hui, viz.: Mrs. Pipili Pakaua Polani, of Waipouli; Mrs. Kaupena Uka, of Hanalei; Mrs. Hana Kaiwi, of Honolulu;…

(Garden Island, 11/28/1916, p. 2) Continue reading

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Sure victory for the Kona team of Prince Kuhio, 1910.

PADDLERS OF PRINCE KALANIANAOLE.

To the Editor of the Kuokoa, Aloha kaua: Please may I have an open column of your paper, and it will be for you to flash across the calmly surging seas from Hawaii to Niihau.

The air this morning was brisk and refreshing until the time when the paddler boys of Kona boarded the Mauna Loa for Honolulu to carry off once again the victory on the 17th of this month, that being Saturday. There are six of these paddlers of Prince Kalanianaole, and these are their names and their positions: Continue reading

Manuia Maunupau, old-time Kona fisherman, passes away, 1940.

Noted Isle Fisherman Who Taught Rulers, Will Be Buried Today

MANUIA MAUNUPAU

Manuia Maunupau Dies In Honolulu After Long Career On Kona Coast

A famous old-time Hawaiian fisherman, one who taught Island royalty the art, will be laid to rest here this afternoon when Manuia Maunupau of Kailua, Kona, is buried.

Mr. Maunupau died Sunday night at the home of his son, Thomas K. Maunupau, 3326 Hoolulu street, after an illness of three months. He was 68 years old and had come to Honolulu in February for medical treatment.

Born In Honolulu

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today at Silva’s mortuary, where the body has been on view since last night. Interment will take place Puea cemetery.

Mr. Maunupau was born in Honuakaha, this city, but spent his boyhood days in fishing at Kuhio and Kaupulehu, two of the old-time fishing villages in that section of Kona called “the waste and waterless Kekaha.”

Knew Waters

It was from his father, Maihui, that he learned the various methods of fishing. He knew the names and location of the koas or fishing grounds, particularly those surrounding the area know as Haleohi’u, “the house of many fish tails,” which is located between Keahole Point and Kuhio.

Mr. Maunupau knew the landmarks of these fishing grounds: their characteristics, such as depth, current and the kinds of fish that are found there. He knew the stars, current and the winds.He knew every rock and reef offshore and could steer a canoe or boat blindfolded along the west coast of Hawaii.

Royal Fisherman

For a short time, Manuia Maunupau was a mate on a schooner owned by George McDougall, who was then doing business in Kailua, Hawaii, more than 40 years ago, and which ran between West Hawaii ports and Honolulu.

J. B. Curts, manager of H. Hackfeld & Co., Ltd., of Kailua, Hawaii, hired him as a pilot to steer lumber vessels when they were…

(Honolulu Advertiser, 3/26/1940, p. 1)

Advertiser_3_26_1940_1.png

The Honolulu Advertiser, 84th Year, Number 19,145, Page 1. March 26, 1940.

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Visit to Ahuimanu College and impressions of Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1873.

Ahuimanu College.

During our vacation, our pleasant diversion was a visit to the other side of the island to attend the examination of the Catholic Seminary, known as Ahuimanu College. The trip to that point takes us over celebrated Pali, the pass and precipice which afford such a noble view of the lovely landscape on the northeaster side of the island. We went in state to the Pali with a four in hand, driven by mine host of our Hotel, who is as good a whip as he is a caterer. We partook of a dejeuner upon a knoll which overlooks the enchanting view; and then descended on foot the steep stairway of the mountain. The slope would not be so very difficult if the constant winds driving through this gorge of the mountain did not compel, sometimes, gentlemen to hold on to their hats, and ladies to hats and skirts, with both hands. The cavern of the winds seems situated hereabout, and Eolus and Boreas try to crack their cheeks in blowing on every passer-by. At the foot of the Pali we found friend Doiron awaiting us with a good vehicle and a stout horse, and having also the assistance of two boys on horseback, who attached their lariats to the shafts of our buggy, to help over the hills, away we went, a merry company of six in a trap made to carry four, and at noon on the third instant we arrived at the lovely retreat of Ahuimanu.

Father Lieven, the Principal, a stout hearty gentleman, of about forty years of age, gave us a welcome; which was heightened by meeting his coadjutor Father McGinniss, a genial son of the Isle of Faith. In the course of the day, the Venerable Bishop Monseigneur Maigret, accompanied by Father Aubert of Lahaina, arrived; and subsequently we had the honor to meet for the first time Father Damien, our hero who has devoted his life to the lepers. And soon, with this intelligent, cultivated and chatty company of Reverends, we found ourselves very pleasantly at home.

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Mele Inoa for Kauikeaouli, Kamehameha III. 1862.

Also, I am behind, but go check out last week’s “Welo Hou” post about “Aita oe e parau”!
https://www.bishopmuseum.org/a-i-ka-%ca%bboe-palau-aita-%ca%bboe-e-parau/

nupepa

HE INOA NO KAUIKEAOULI.

Auhea wale ana oe, kapua hau o Maleka,
Ke au nei ka manao, Pehea o Niagala,
Kela wai kamahao, wai halulu o ka moano,
Nene i na moku, lohe aku nei Lukini,
Ua ana ia Kuleke, aohe i hopo Ladana,
I ka nui o Asia, hue a ke kaona nui,
Laki ka moana Iniana, ehuehu Enelani,
Ke kowa o Sekotia, aita oe e palau,
No’u o Ainahau, a ka wai o Nolewai,
Pau mai ko’u palena, ilaila a’u la oki,
Lawe u’a linohau, a ai ka manu iluna,
I kilohi iho kuu hana, he nani o Hudesona,
Kaikuono Papine, mea ua ae ia,
Me oe a ke aloha iwini o ke aumoa,
Auhea wale ana oe, e ka uneune puuwai,
E ke kaukini ma-lo, nana i ue laholio,
Hoomaloe i kuu kino, hooueue i ka moe,
Lana koi kahi manao, halanalana i ka leo,
O ua…

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Anyone know who Laulani Koki is? 1890.

Did you check out yesterday’s post on “Welo Hou” yet? All these sources coming together make for a bigger understanding of history! See the post at: https://www.bishopmuseum.org/hanohano-waimea-i-ka-wai-kea/

nupepa

HE INOA NO LAULANI KOKI

Hanohano Hanalei i ka ua nui
He pakika i ka limu o Manuakepa
Anu hewa i ka wai o Lumahai
Kalehuamakanoe o Luluupali
Alai e ka noe paa o Naue
E ena Haena i ka ehukai
I maliu i ke ala o ka lauae
A heaha ka hana a Lohiau ipo
O ka li’a i ka wai Kuauhoe
O ka nihi a ke ahi i Makuaiki
Haaheo i ka haka o Nualolo
Ka anohi uakoko i ka moana
Wehiwehi Polihale i ka Pahapaha
I ka lei makahehi a ka malihini
Ua nani Mana i ka liula
Ka anapa ka alohi aiai na ike
Ike i ke one kani o Nohili
Kohu Vaiolina ke hone mai
Haina ia mai ana ka puana
O Halia Laulani ko’u inoa.

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Upon the opening of Hulihee Palace, 1928.

Story of Hulihee Palace Told By Mrs. Swanzy On Even of New Dedication

The Daughters of Hawaii will dedicate the old Hulihee palace at Kailua, Kona, Hawaii, on noon of Kamehameha day, June 11, the ceremony to be followed by a luau at 1 o’clock.

Restoration of the old palace, the site of which was set aside by Governor Farrington for a Hawaiian museum to be maintained by and cared for under the management of the Daughter of Hawaii, has been one of the big accomplishments of the Daughters during the last year. The 1925 legislature appropriated $10,000 for its purchase. Continue reading