Singers from Hawaiia, 1920.

SIX OF HAWAII’S FINEST MUSICIANS COMING HERE FROM ISLANDS TO PRESERVE MUSICAL IDEALS OF NATIVE LAND

Hand-Picked Company of Native Musicians in the Islands Chosen for Long Tour in United States and Canada During Present Summer—Sailed May 19th from Honolulu with Mildred Leo Clemens

Mildred Leo Clemone and Her Native Hawaiians of the Famous Waikiki Beach, April, 1920

Six of the finest native musicians in all the Hawaiian Islands sailed from Honolulu on May 19th on the steamship “Maui,” to fill their first American engagement. They will appear on the Colt Alber Premier circuit in Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky, Ohio. Continue reading

Spreading Hawaiian music and dance in America and Canada, 1920.

WILL ADVERTISE HAWAII THROUGHOUT STATES

Mildred Lee Clemens and her company of Hawaiian musicians and dancers who will sail with her on the S. S. Maui, May 19, and appear on the Colt-Alber Chautauqua Premier Circuit of the Atlantis coast and Canada, beginning June 10.

Continue reading

Hawaiian musicians go abroad, 1920.

THE SINGING OF THESE HAWAIIANS IS MOVING FORWARD

The photo above is of a group of Hawaiian singers taken to America, and they are in Canada at the moment, as per what Steven Lukua Matthew told Mrs. Rebecca Lukua, his mother here in Honolulu. There are six of them, and they are all Hawaiians, and their names are: the boys, Steven Lukua Matthew, John J. Matthew, and Kahaia Pahu; and the women are Kuuleipoinaole [Ida Alicante], Ane Hila, and Kamaka Pahu. Continue reading

Death of Francis Spencer in Kansas, 1920.

DIED IN AN ACCIDENT IN KANSAS

A wireless [lono uwea olelo] was received by Frank Spencer of Waimea from the state of Kansas informing  him that his child who is attending school there died in an accident, and this tragedy happened because of an elevator [eleveita]. Some time ago, that youth graduated from Kamehameha School with honors, and he was employed at the Paahau sugar plantation for a time, Continue reading

More on painting by Hitchcock at Hilo Library, 1926.

PAINTING BY LOCAL ARTIST TO HANG IN HILO LIBRARY

D. HOWARD HITCHCOCK OFFERS PICTURE OF ISLAND SCENE TO PUBLIC HERE

D. Howard Hitchcock, Hawaii’s own master artist, has signified a desire to have his work with the brush and pallete represented publicly in his native city of Hilo, and has offered one of his paintings to the Hilo Public Library, where the picture is now on exhibition for a few weeks, pending the pleasure of the directors in accepting it.

The painting represents Mauna Kea glowing with high color from the setting sun, as seen from the Waimea plains, while the foreground lies in the cool tones of the gathering dusk. Continue reading

And of course, rice, 1862.

[Found under: “NEWS OF HAWAII NEI.”]

RICE.—We are overjoyed to see that rice is planted by one of our friends, S. Kamakahiki, in Hana, East Maui; there is a lot of grain and it is of good quality; why O Friends, are you dallying on planting this good source of money? We are amazed at the small number of people undertaking the growing of rice in Hana, for this is how it is, according to the letter of S. Kamakahiki, like this:

“I am the only one growing Rice here in Hana; I am harvesting the Rice and storing it at my house; I am filled with joy that I have found this good occupation.”

(Kuokoa, 2/15/1862, p. 2)

Raiki.