Giant Powder is not only bad for the environment, 1882.

DIED WHILE GATHERING FISH USING GIANT POWDER.

Please accept my bundle that I put before you, and it shall be you that will give it your all out amongst the public so that our friends who enjoy news will know about it, from the rising sun at Haehae to Lehua where the sun is held back and done. And this is it: Continue reading

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Fishing using explosives, 1895.

The Blasting of Fish Prevails.

Mr. Editor:

On the travels of the Circuit Court Judge of Maui, to Kaupo, Kipahulu, Hana, and all the way to the Koolau cliffs of Maui, to ask for money for the building of Wailuku, and we were lucky in what money was collected. I was one who went along on this journey. When we reached Kipahulu, to Hakuole’s place, a policeman, with his son, Kimo Hakuole who is a school teacher; the locals were very hospitable. Continue reading

54 years after their arrival, the old gannenmono are taken for a joyride, 1922.

The Newest and the Oldest

The three old gannenmono go on a joyride in a Cadillac in 1922.

There was coverage in this column last week about Dr. Eijiro Nishijima purchasing the newest 1922 model four-passenger Cadillac (Phaeton) from the American Hawaiian Motors Company, but there is a story about the group of Hawaii’s oldest [Japanese] men sightseeing within the city in this newest car. That is, last Wednesday, the three old men, [Sentaro] Ishii, [Yonekichi] Sakuma, and [Katsusaburo] Yoshida were invited to the Youth Association’s Thursday  luncheon, and on their way home, in front of the Nishijima Clinic on Kukui Street, through the introduction of an accompanying reporter of this paper, Mrs. Nishijima thought it would be nice to give the old men a ride, and with their pleasure, Shuichi Hirano of the aforementioned car company who was present personally took the wheel, and drove the three old men straight down Beritania Avenue. The car was great, the road was great, and Manoa Valley, beautiful. Continue reading

Day honoring Kamehameha Paiea, 1892.

KAMEHAMEHA DAY

This 11th day of June is one of the important days for Hawaiians, cherished and greatly displayed amongst the holidays of the land. This day was established by Kamehameha V as a day of remembrance for his royal kupuna Kamehameha I, the conqueror of the nation who unified all of the islands to be governed under one alii. Continue reading

Why do we ignore science? 1983.

Volcano alarm sounded, but nobody listened

Clark’s Big Isle

“You may bring a horse to the river, but he will drink when and what he pleaseth.”

—George Herbert, 1640.

HILO.—In early 1975, Drs. Donald Peterson and Donald Mullineaux, volcanologists, issued a report, “Volcanic Hazards on the Island of Hawaii.” If reaction had come in a theater, the audience would have booed.

Peterson was scoffed at by Big Island real estate agents and tourist industry leaders. Mayor Herbert Matayoshi jumped on the bandwagon and castigated the scientists for unduly alarming residents, potential visitors and prospective investors.

As a result, the report was largely ignored. Continue reading

Experiment of Japanese laborers, 1868.

NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Arrival of Japanese Emigrants.—The British ship Scioto, Captain Reagan, arrived yesterday, 33 days from Yokohama, Japan, with the first instalment of Japanese laborers, selected and shipped to the Hawaiian Government by its Consul Mr. Van Reed. These laborers are in charge of Dr. D. J. Lee and Mr. A. D. Baum, who have taken special care to preserve the health of the passengers, and they have arrived in excellent condition. Continue reading