From “The Origins of the Archipelago of Hawaii nei and its Peopling as Seen in the Old Mele,” collected by John H. Wise, 1912.

[He MOOLELO NO KA Hookumuia Ana o na Paemoku o Hawaii Nei AME KA HOOLAUKANAKA ANA I HOIKEIA MA NA MELE HAWAII KAHIKO: Houluuluia e John H. Wise.]

Pauku 6.

O hanau ka Mauna a Wakea,
O puu a’e ka mauna a Wakea,
O Wakea ke kane, o Walinuu ka wahine,
Hanau Haloa he’lii, Continue reading

Kaumualii and Kaahumanu seek out Nihoa, 1868.

[Found under: “KA MOOLELO O NA KAMEHAMEHA.”]

Kaumualii built several large houses for Kaahumanu at Papaenaena. When Kaahumanu was staying on Kauai. A great desire grew within her to search for Nihoa, a land that was not known to the new generations. But Nihoa was found in the stories and the mele of the ole people. When Kaahumanu heard the chant of Kaweloamahunaalii. Continue reading

Where are R. Kapihe’s critiques of Kamakau? 1868.

S. M. Kamakau seems to write two Hawaiian language articles responding to R. Kapihe’s critiques. The first one, “He papa hulikoa; he alukakoa; he ahikahalelo, he iliohalawaena,” appears in Au Okoa on 7/23/1868, p. 3. Kamakau says he is responding to a letter from R. Kapihe of perhaps Kailua, Koolaupoko, that appears “on the 16th of this month.” He responds to a number of  criticisms that appeared in Kapihe’s letter about Kamakau’s history of Kamehamehas. Continue reading

S. M. Kamakau on history, 1868.

Letter from Mr. Kamakau.

To all Literary Gentlemen and Friends in Hawaii and elsewhere:

A certain person, styling himself in the Gazette, “A Hawaiian,” and whom I judge to be the same who signs himself in the Au Okoa “R. Kapihe,” and who, moreover, I doubt not,is one aspiring to a very high rank in the Kingdom, seems very jealous of my statements in the Hawaiian History which I am now writing. The line of descent of some of the present high chiefs, and their relationship to Kamehameha I, as I have stated it, appears to find especial disfavor in his eyes, perhaps and very probably, for the reason that another name very near at home to the above-mentioned writer is not included among those whom I have written down as descendants and near of kin to Kamehameha I. Continue reading

Death of Lorrin Andrews, 1868.

Hon. Lorrin Andrews.

The Honorable Rev. Lorrin Andrews, member of His Majesty’s Privy Council of State, expired at his residence yesterday, Tuesday the 29th, in the 74th year of his age. He has been confined but little over a week, having been seized with what appeared to be an attack of pleurisy, but which soon became complicated with other symptoms,and made it evident that death would ensue. Last Saturday he fell into a comotose state, which continue up to the extinction of life. Continue reading