More alii going to fish for upapalu, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

Fond of fishing.—The moonlit nights of this past week were spent by some makaainana and alii by going fishing outside of Honolulu Harbor, in lagoons and other places they wanted to fish. The fishes they caught  were upapalu, u-u, aweoweo, moi, awa, and alalauwa. Continue reading

This is some fishing story! 1893.

LETTERS

[We do not wish to carry the responsibility for the errors of the ideas printed below this title by our writers.]

The Starving Ones in the Upland are Saved, a Strange Fish was Landed.

O Kuokoa Newspaper

Aloha to you and your metal type setting boys, and your Editor.

Please take around those words placed above.

On Monday, the 4th of this month, a large strange fish was landed in Ewa; a fish of the deep sea.

And this is the story on that early morning of that day mentioned above. Continue reading

Kawaiahau Glee Club performs at Progress Hall, 1904.

A NIGHT OF PLEASURE OF HALALII.*

The Kawaihau Glee Club announced that it will hold a night of pleasure of Halalii at Progress Hall, on the Ewa corner of Beritania and Fort Streets, tomorrow night. The club will get together with all its eighteen members, offering their merry voices and joyous music, while those who go there will spin with their partners. Continue reading

Newspapers can’t survive on just aloha, 1918.

Mrs. Becky Wilkinson of Kahului paid for the life of her Hoku, all the way until May 1919. This is tremendous confidence for which we give our greatest aloha. Who else will follow this good Mother of the rising and falling seas of Kahului.

[The last Hawaiian language newspaper, Ka Hoku o Hawaii, will decrease to a two page format from 5/6/1942 and prints its final issue in 1948.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 1/24/1918, p. 2)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Buke 12, Helu 35, Aoao 2. Ianari 24, 1918.

Turn your hands down, 1925.

[Found under: “1925 1926”]

Good works for the Kingdom of God, strive to enter into those works; for they will help you with your life. Here are the church steeples pointing upward towards the good hope of rebirth, and it would not be detrimental to you O Dear reader to join in works of the Kingdom of God here on earth.

Good works that will benefit you on earth, are those activities that will be good for you and your loved ones upon the earth; do not be ashamed to put your hands down into the earth to grow good things from Mother earth that will bless your life upon the earth. Continue reading

Arrests being made for disturbing the peace? 1892.

“HOOKAHI NO HAWAE LAUHUE KONA.”*

This past Friday, the Government began arresting people thought to be taking part in activities that go against the good and the peace of the Nation, and these are the names that we obtained. The Hon. Wilcox, the Hon. J. W. Bipikane, Mr. V. V. Ashford, and many others.

*An olelo noeau speaking to the wide-reaching power of a single entity.

(Hawaii Holomua, 5/21/1892, p. 3)

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Hawaii Holomua, Buke II, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 21, 1892.

Words of advice from Kamehameha I, 1891.

BE PATIENT.

O Friends, Companions, those who go hand in hand with the Leo, who walk together on the sands of Kakuhihewa moistened by the Kukalahale rains, living from Maunalua to Moanalua. Greetings to you all.

Remember the title above, “I nui ke aho.” This is one of the touching statements said by our Land Conqueror [Na’i Aina], when one of his warriors was pierced by a barbed spear; when he saw this predicament, he grabbed and pulled the spear, and that is when the warrior cried out in pain. But that conqueror of aina responded quickly while shedding tears, “My son, be patient.” Continue reading

First birthday of Carrie Akau celebrated and other wild news from Kawaihae Kai, 1916.

EXPRESSION OF AFFECTION FROM KAWAIHAE KAI

Ka Hoku o Hawaii,

Aloha oe.

At 12 o’clock on the 12th of this month, August, W. P. Akau, policeman of Kawaihae, and his wife commemorated the first birthday of their baby. The name of the child is Carrie Akau. Your writer and his family were invited along with all those of Kawaihae to go to this celebratory banquet for the birthday of this child prepared by her parents, and before ten kupuna of each, your writer was asked by Mrs. W. P. Akau to give words of prayer to the Heavenly Father, before the eating, and this invitation was complied to by your writer to appeal to the Heavenly Father to lengthen the life of this child whose the day was for, and that she dwell in peace and protection from above, by his incomparable grace.

A FIGHT CAUSED BY KIAWE.

On the 14th of August, some women of the Kololio Wind of Puako took to fisticuffs. The reason was that Mrs. A. K. took kiawe that belonged to Mrs. K. A., which resulted in that woman becoming angry that the result of her labor was being taken, and Mrs. K. A. forbade Mrs. A. K., saying, “Don’t you take that bag of kiawe, that is my bag of kiawe.” Continue reading

Marriages from a hundred years ago, 1916 / 2016.

TWO MARRIAGES OF PUUANAHULU BOUND TOGETHER

On Saturday, the 19 of this month, there were two couples joined together in the holy covenant of marriage by the Rev. James Upchurch. The couple joined together was Miss Lizzie Alapai and Joseph Sane.  They are both youths; the young woman is from Puuanahulu in the lofty heights, and the young man is from the furrowed jagged cliff faces of Puuwaawaa in the hazy heavy mists.

The second couple was Mrs. Kamakahuki Kaumelelau and Mr. Kailihiwa Kuehu; both of whom are elderly [aoo], gray-haired ones of Puuanahulu in the lofty heights.

After the ceremony was over, there was held a simple meal, and on the following Sunday, February 20, there was party held with a table laden with the delicacies to be drooled at, and we ate until we were full of the things that were prepared by the couples. The ones who got joined together, were grandchildren and grandparents, and they live in one home. The grandchild got married, and the grandparent got married, the passion in the loving waters of Waialoha is shared. Yes, it is so. Marriage is an admired thing for all, lest one’s bed be sullied.

These have been sweltering days in Puuanahulu in the lofty heights, but the verdure of the land from one side to the other remains; there are much grasses of this mountainous region in the uplands of the Highlands [Hilina] of the assembly of hills.

My affection and appreciation,

NA KUAHIWI EKOLU.

Puuanahulu, Feb. 21, 1916.

[Na Kuawihi Ekolu is Ka Ohu Haaheo i na Kuahiwi Ekolu, which was a pen name for J. W. H. Isaac Kihe.]

(Hoku o Hawaii, 3/9/1916, p. 3)

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Ka Hoku o Hawaii, Volume Buke 10, Helu 40, Aoao 3. Maraki 9, 1916.

Short biography of the great Joseph Mokuohai Poepoe, 1912.

JOSEPH MOKUOHAI POEPOE

This candidate for the legislature in the Democratic party of Oahu nei was born at Honomakau, which is famous for the saying: “No youth of Kohala goes out unprepared” [“Aohe u’i hele wale o Kohala”]. This also is the birthplace of the Hon. H. M. Kaniho. He was born on the 27th of March, 1852. When he was small, he was brought to Honolulu. He entered into the districts schools [kula apana] here in Honolulu, and also in Kalauao, Ewa. And thereafter he attended the Royal School at Kehehuna, and its head Instructor was Mr. Beckwith. After two years there, he entered Ahuimanu College in Koolaupoko, under the instruction of the Fathers Elekenio, Remona, Livino, and the many other teachers. He was taught law in North Kohala under Judge P. Kamakaia. He returned here to Honolulu and studied law at the law school of W. R. Castle [W. R. Kakela], as well as at the law school of S. B. Dole. He studied law with lawyers Davidson and Lukela. In 1884, he received his full license to practice law in all Courts of Hawaii nei, and he still retains his law license. He was an editor for many of the Hawaiian-language newspapers in this town. Currently, he is the editor for KE ALOHA AINA. He was a teacher at the boarding school of Rev. E. Bond [Rev. E. Bona] in Kohala. He was the first to establish an English language school in North Kohala, Hawaii. He was an assistant teacher at the British Government School at Ainakea, under H. P. Wood, and thereafter under E. N. Dyer. For many years he tried to join the Legislature, so that the lahui would see him pass laws that would benefit the lahui in need; but the people did not assent. Now his hope is that it will be in the upcoming election that the voters will come through, making him a Representative, whereupon he will show his works for the good of the land and for the advancement of the lahui.

[Poepoe played a huge part in the history of the Hawaiian-Language Newspapers! I was happy to find this. Also, I just saw this morning more on the Catholic school at Ahuimanu on Nanea Armstrong-Wassel’s instagram page. Go check it out. There is a picture of the school as well!]

(Aloha Aina, 10/26/1912, p. 1)

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Ke Aloha Aina, Buke XVII, Helu 43, Aoao 1. Okatoba 26, 1912.