New clothes at Afong and Achuck’s, 1869.

[Found under: “NU HOU KULOKO: Oahu.”]

New Chinese Clothes.—Afong [Afona] and Achuck [Akaka], Chinese merchants of this town, Continue reading

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George J. Fern starts a poi business, 1917.

Mr. George J. Fern

HAS OPENED

a Poi Shop at the Market. Go and see him and His Delicious Poi. Liliha and Kukui.

(Puuhonua o na Hawaii, 5/25/1917, p. 3)

PONH_5_25_1917_3.png

Ka Puuhonua o na Hawaii, Buke IV, Helu 21, Aoao 3. Mei 25, 1917.

C. R. Bishop turns 87, 1909.

CHARLES R. BISHOP THANKS THE CHAMBER

Charles R. Bishop, the founder and first president of the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce, to whom a congratulatory cablegram was sent on January 26, last, writes to the Chamber as follows:

“Many thanks to the Honolulu Chamber of Commerce for congratulations and best wishes on this the eighty-seventh anniversary of my birth. Wishing the Chamber continued efficiency and prosperity, I remain, yours very truly,  CHARLES R. BISHOP.

[C. R. Bishop is widely known for his involvement in many great endeavors, but he might not be so well know for his founding of the Chamber of Commerce which is still active today.]

(Hawaiian Gazette, 2/12/1909, p. 3)

HawaiianGazette_2_12_1909_3

Hawaiian Gazette, Volume LI, Number 117, Page 3. February 12, 1909.

New Hawaiian shop, “Ka Noeau o Hawaii,” 1896.

“Ka Noeau o Hawaii.”

This is the name of a store that opened on this Independence Day [La Kuokoa] by some Hawaiian women in an office of Charles Aki’s [Kale Aki] large new rental space just built at Leleo near Koiuiu. There is sold Hawaiian goods fashioned with skill by the hands of women like ie hats, fans, blankets, purses, lace, and many other things, and also they do tailoring. This shop is under the equal management of Mrs. Aana Kekoa and her sister L. Aoe Like and Meleana Li. We doubt it, but it is said that they did sacrifices with the snout of a pig, and they feasted with those that labored with them until satiated. Our prayer for them is that they meet with good fortune and progress.

(Makaainana, 12/7/1896, p. 2)

"Ka Noeau o Hawaii."

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 23, Aoao 2. Dekemaba 7, 1896.

Hotel Fairview, Lihue, 1906.

HOTEL FAIRVIEW, LIHUE, KAUAI

The furniture and effects with all the permanent improvements of the above hotel, together with a lease of the premises, are for sale on account of the departure of the present lessee.

The hotel is fully equipped for the accommodation of guests, and has at the present a number of regular boarders.

There are twelve sleeping rooms in the main building, on the premises is a cottage containing five rooms and a bath, another with two rooms and a bath, and a third with two rooms, all well furnished.

Besides these are servants’ quarters, stables and carriage house, cow sheds, etc. The lease has six years to run.

Possession given on December 1st. The business of the hotel is on a paying basis, and a good opportunity is offered to the right man. Terms very low. Address Hotel Fairview, Lihue, Kauai.

(Pacific Commercial Advertiser, 11/15/1906, p. 6)

HOTEL FAIRVIEW, LIHUE, KAUAI

The Pacific Commercial Advertiser, Volume XLIV, Number 7573, Page 6. November 15, 1906.

Napoleon Kalolii Pukui supporting Charles E. King for delegate to Congress, 1922.

Truth of Truths.

There was something new heard from my candidate, Charles E. King [Kale E. Kini], when he announced on the past 18th, that being this past Monday, that he met with Papai (Clarence Crabbe), the manager of John Wise [Keoni Waika], who relayed his thoughts to my candidate. “We were given the endorsement from the prominent ones [maka nunui] of five sugar plantations, and here in the palm of my hand is the money to push John Wise into the win, the candidate of their choice.

“Therefore, you and Lyman [Laimana] have no hopes for winning.”

That was wen my candidate replied back to him, “Hey, Papai [“Crab”], wasn’t it you who came before me in person three times asking for me to run as a candidate this season?” So I said to you, What about John Wise? And you told me that I cannot trust him; you are the one that I trust, more than him; and now you are tossing me aside. This is not something that will make me give up; I will run for the win and the victory.”

This is what Papai’s answer was to him, “I really don’t want this job, my being prodded on at this work by the big wigs of the Sugar Plantations.”

So therefore friends, we see the sugar plantation’s representative and fishing konohiki; we scope out the name of the fish of the fisherman, a “Papai,” and that is the fish caught in the fish trap [hinai] of John Wise, his fish is a crab.

He will not catch the delectable travelling uhu of Kaena Point, the craving of the daughter of Kakuhihewa. How is that fisherman throwing out his chum; he probably did not consider first the flow of the current; he just threw out his chum where the current will carry it out to Mauiloa, and so the fisherman will return home with nothing, his fish will be the crab, the crab with its menacing claws.

We all know that money is being thrown about these days; take it and fill your palms, but on election day, think carefully. Let Charles King be yours.

Sincerely,

NAPOLEON K. PUKUI

[The word play in the original Hawaiian is very fun. N. K. Pukui was a character!]

(Kuokoa, 10/5/1922, p. 7)

KA OIAIO O NA OIAIO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 40, Aoao 7. Okatoba 5, 1922.