Napoleon Kalolii Pukui supporting Charles E. King for delegate to Congress, 1922.

Truth of Truths.

There was something new heard from my candidate, Charles E. King [Kale E. Kini], when he announced on the past 18th, that being this past Monday, that he met with Papai (Clarence Crabbe), the manager of John Wise [Keoni Waika], who relayed his thoughts to my candidate. “We were given the endorsement from the prominent ones [maka nunui] of five sugar plantations, and here in the palm of my hand is the money to push John Wise into the win, the candidate of their choice.

“Therefore, you and Lyman [Laimana] have no hopes for winning.”

That was wen my candidate replied back to him, “Hey, Papai [“Crab”], wasn’t it you who came before me in person three times asking for me to run as a candidate this season?” So I said to you, What about John Wise? And you told me that I cannot trust him; you are the one that I trust, more than him; and now you are tossing me aside. This is not something that will make me give up; I will run for the win and the victory.”

This is what Papai’s answer was to him, “I really don’t want this job, my being prodded on at this work by the big wigs of the Sugar Plantations.”

So therefore friends, we see the sugar plantation’s representative and fishing konohiki; we scope out the name of the fish of the fisherman, a “Papai,” and that is the fish caught in the fish trap [hinai] of John Wise, his fish is a crab.

He will not catch the delectable travelling uhu of Kaena Point, the craving of the daughter of Kakuhihewa. How is that fisherman throwing out his chum; he probably did not consider first the flow of the current; he just threw out his chum where the current will carry it out to Mauiloa, and so the fisherman will return home with nothing, his fish will be the crab, the crab with its menacing claws.

We all know that money is being thrown about these days; take it and fill your palms, but on election day, think carefully. Let Charles King be yours.

Sincerely,

NAPOLEON K. PUKUI

[The word play in the original Hawaiian is very fun. N. K. Pukui was a character!]

(Kuokoa, 10/5/1922, p. 7)

KA OIAIO O NA OIAIO.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LXI, Helu 40, Aoao 7. Okatoba 5, 1922.

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(Evening Bulletin, 7/2/1910, p. 16)

THE RESIDENCE UNDERTAKING PARLOR...

Evening Bulletin, Established 1882, Number 4660, Page 16. July 2, 1910.

Lucas Brothers, 1911.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.

Notice is hereby given that the partnership heretofore existing between CHARLES LUCAS, JOHN LUCAS, and LYDIA LUCAS TRUSTEE under the firm named LUCAS BROTHERS doing business as the HONOLULU PLANING MILL, is dissolved as of this date, Charles Lucas retiring from said partnership.

Charles Lucas the retiring partner, will pay all accounts existing against said partnership at the date hereof, and will collect and receive all accounts due said partnership.

Dated at Honolulu, April 19, 1911.

CHARLES LUCAS,
JOHN LUCAS,
LYDIA LUCAS, TRUSTEE.

(Hawaiian Star, 4/25/1911, p. 11)

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.

The Hawaiian Star, Volume XIV, Number 5942, Page 11. April 25, 1911.

J. T. Unea retires after over 20 years as newspaper agent, 1919.

LEAVES HIS POST AS AGENT.

Mr. Solomon Hanohano, Aloha oe:—Due to me going partially blind, and not being able to obtain a fountain pen [peni inika], I am therefore announcing to you, because of those reasons mentioned above, I am setting aside my position as agent for 20 years and more for the Nupepa Kuokoa, and also for the Aloha Aina and Alakai o Hawaii, with great appreciation for your (Kuokoa) and Aloha Aina’s full trust in me, your humble servant, for these many days.

Me, with aloha,

JOHN TAYLOR UNEA.

Kalaupapa, Oct. 28, 1919.

(Kuokoa, 11/17/1919, p. 3)

WAIHO MAI I KONA NOHO AKENA ANA.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke LVII, Helu 45, Aoao 3. Novemaba 7, 1919.