Lunalilo Crypt, 1875.

[Found under: “Nu Hou Kuloko.”]

Crypt of Lunalilo.—Because of the request by the Executor of the Will of the Deceased dearly beloved King Lunalilo to Kawaiahao Church, for a place to build his crypt, as per his will, therefore, an open space in front of the church was given, makai of the circular yard right in front of the entrance to the church. There will be built his crypt and he will sleep there with his people in the same cemetery. How sad this is!

(Kuokoa, 9/19/1875, p. 2)

Hale Kupapau o Lunalilo.

Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, Buke XIII, Helu 38, Aoao 2. Sepatemaba 19, 1874.

 

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Report of Kalakaua’s death from the “San Francisco Chronicle,” 1891.

KALAKAUA DEAD

Last Hours of the Hawaiian Monarch.

Solemn Scenes at the Royal Bedside.

The Succession and the Political Situation.

Sketches of the Dead Sovereign and of the Heirs to the Throne.

Kalakaua I., King of the Hawaiian Islands, is dead. He expired at 2:33 o’clock yesterday afternoon in his room at the Palace Hotel, where for three days he had lain unconscious on his bed. Surrounding him at the moment of his death were Col. Macfarlane, the King’s Chamberlain; Col. Hoapili Baker, His Majesty’s Equerry-in-waiting; Hawaiian Consul McKinley, Admiral Brown, U. S. N. Rev. J. Sanders Reed, Rev. F. H. Church and a number of personal friends of the King. Immediately after the death, Admiral Brown notified the Secretary of the Navy of that fact, Mayor Sanderson was also notified, and he called a meeting of the Supervisors for 9 o’clock this morning to consider proper action in the matter. The remains were embalmed and this afternoon they will be removed to the mortuary chapel of Trinity Church, where they will be guarded by a detail of United States soldiers.

At the Deathbed.

The Scenes in the Chamber of the Dying Monarch.

It was a pitiful and most impressive scene. The dying monarch lay gasping upon his bed, his emaciated body heaving convulsively with each of his labored respirations. At the bedside stood two ministers of the Gospel, physicians of the body had given way when they had come to the sad conclusion that Kalakaua was beyond mortal aid. Seated at the head of the bed, clasping the left hand of his King was Col. Baker, Kalakaua’s Aid-de-camp, whose strong frame was bent with sorrow, and who with great difficulty kept back the flood of tears which trembled in his eyes. Bending over from the right side was Col. Macfarlane, Chamberlain of the King. The suspense of the last few days had almost prostrated him, and his face bore traces of weeping. Crouched upon the floor against the wall near the bedside were the King’s valet Kahikina, an Hawaiian youth, and Kalua, a young girl from the Gilbert islands, who had been a most devoted servant to Kalakaua. They formed part of his suite on his arrival here.

Only a light coverlet of rich brown design covered the body of the King. In his struggles to throw off the firm reaper who was gradually pressing more heavily upon him, Kalakaua had thrust his arms out upon the bed. During the forenoon his faithful servant Kalua, in an endeavor to make the King as comfortable as possible, had placed beneath his chin a wide soft scarf of blue silk. There it remained until the death, seeming as it rose and fell upon the bright red undershirt to be symbolical of the wavering between this and the great beyond of the spirit of the stricken King.

Kalakaua was possessed of great vitality, and to the last he resisted the destroyer with a persistence which excited the wonder of the medical men, who knew that the King’s time had come. Though for three days past he had been unconscious and life had apparently been kept in him merely by the stimulants applied internally through natural channels or hypodermically, his constitution seemed determined to keep the spirit with the trembling body. Even after the physicians had relinquished all hope and, knowing that he must die, had ceased to apply stimulants, he continued to struggle on.

During the morning Drs. Woods, Watts, Sanger and Taylor were in attendance.

They consulted and announced that in their opinion the King would not live more than a few hours. He had then been unconscious for nearly forty hours, with the exception of one brief moment in the early morning, when he recognized Admiral Brown and spoke to Colonel Baker saying:

“Well, I am a very sick man.” Continue reading

Hawaiian Historical Society established, 1892.

THE HAWAIIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

On the evening of Dec. 28th, a few of our citizens met and engaged in an informal interchange of ideas in regard to the importance of forming an Historical Society. Prof. Alexander was chosen temporary chairman, and the Rev. Dr. Hyde secretary. It was then decided that the proper time had come for the organization of such a society, and a committee composed of Prof. Alexander, Rev. Dr. Hyde and Mr. J. S. Emerson was chosen to draft a constitution. An adjourned meeting was held last Monday evening at the Honolulu Library, at which this committee made its report. A large number of our most prominent citizens attended, and much interest was shown in the formal organization of the new society. After the adoption of the constitution the following officers were unanimously elected: President, Hon. C. R. Bishop; Vice-President, Mr. J. S. Emerson; Corresponding Secretary, Hon. W. D. Alexander; Recording Secretary, Rev. Dr. C. M. Hyde: Treasurer, Mr. T. G. Thrum. The constitution states that the object of the society is “the collection, study, and utilization of all materials illustrating the Ethnology, Achæology and History of the Hawaiian Islands.” Active members are to pay an initiation fee of five dollars and an annual fee of one dollar. It is hoped that arrangements will be made by which the society will secure as its permanent quarters, for the accommodation of its prospective library and a place of meeting, the large front room of the Honolulu Library. Immediate efforts are to be made for the formation of a library which shall include all books relating in any way to this Kingdom, and all books, pamphlets and newspapers ever printed on the Hawaiian Islands. Continue reading

Queen’s Hospital trustees and the Bishop Museum, 1886.

DECISION OF QUEEN’S HOSPITAL TRUSTEES.

 A special meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Queen’s Hospital was held this morning in the Chamber of Commerce room. The object of the meeting was to consider the advisableness and feasibility of transferring the antiquities and curios left to the Hospital by the will of the late Queen Emma to the Hon. Chas. R. Bishop, who is about to open a national museum. Mr. Kunuiakea, one of the heirs of the Queen Emma estate and part claimant of the curios, consents to give his interest in them to Mr. Bishop for the purpose mentioned, on the condition that the Queen’s Hospital also give their interest. It having been the wish of the late Queen Emma to have a national museum in Honolulu, and such wish having been specified in her will (signed but not witnessed), the Trustees of the Queen’s Hospital have decided to deed to Mr. C. R. Bishop all the curios and antiquities left them by the will of the deceased queen, on the condition that all the ancient relics left by the late High Chiefess Pauahi Bishop, be also given to the museum.

(Daily Herald, 9/16/1886, p. 3)

DECISION OF QUEEN'S HOSPITAL TRUSTEES.

The Daily Bulletin, Volume IX, Number 1432, Page 3. September 15, 1886.

Beginnings of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 1886.

Museum of Antiquities.

A special meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Queen’s Hospital was held yesterday. It was called to consider the question of conveying the Hawaiian antiquities and curios, devised to the Trustees by the will of the late Queen Emma, to the Hon. C. R. Bishop for a projected public museum. Mr. Bishop had sometime ago formed the purpose of founding a museum of Hawaiian antiquities, with the collection of his late consort, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, as the nucleus. Continue reading

Keoua Hale furnishings put on auction, 1895.

[Found under: “KELA A ME KEIA.”]

Keoua Hale was crowded this past Tuesday with people going to see the auction of the furniture of Bishop. The bed of Keelikolani went for $200.

[At the death of Keelikolani, Keoua Hale became the residence of Bernice Pauahi and Charles Reed Bishop. I wonder what became of this bed.]

(Makaainana, 3/18/1895, p. 8)

Laukanaka o Keoua Hale...

Ka Makaainana, Buke III—-Ano Hou, Helu 2, Aoao 8. Maraki 18, 1895.

Words of praise for C. R. Bishop on today, his birthday, 1896.

MEMORIALS.

….¹

There are many kinds of memorials [kia hoomanao] to remember people by. A person is remembered for his deeds, in memorials built as pillars and monuments, in reminiscences, and preserved in the hearts of the many. Famous deeds of people are remembered with aloha for the good, and with scorn for the bad.

Queen Liliuokalani’s beloved efforts stand today as the Hui Hoonaauao i na Opio [Liliuokalani Educational Society].

The epitome of great deeds of these past days was done by a haole who lived here as a malihini and married one of the Princesses amongst the royal youth. Charles R. Bishop built the Kamehameha Schools, the memorial for his wife, the Alii Pauahi Bishop; and by this act of commemoration, a memorial now stands for all of the Kamehamehas, and it is impossible to forget their name.

 In the days when this haole friend was living here in Hawaii, he was often criticized for his stinginess and defiance by Hawaiian and haole alike, but he paid no care to this criticism. He continued with his work, ate healthily, [illegible digital image], until he was a rich man; but in all the criticism for him, there is no way that it could be said that he was a scoundrel or that he cheated someone; and this says a lot for his uprighteousness.

Likewise with his charity work, he acted with maturity and kindness without end in his steadfast support for the benefit of this lahui. In giving, he was not frivolous in his giving, but gave wisely. He donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Punahou College and to the Kamehameha Schools, from his own estate and from that of his wife’s; and from his own, also benefited were the Boarding School for  Boys and Girls. How wondrous is God in his passing down the great entire wealth of the Kamehamehas from one to another until it all came down to Keelikolani and then to Pauahi, the grandchildren of the first born of Kamehameha Nai Aupuni; and it was the last of the two, the one most knowledgeable of them all, as measured by their final deeds, which she created with her husband as a memorial for all of the Kamehamehas. This man was of a great mind in his carrying out meticulously this work which he and his wife discussed between themselves, without misappropriating a single parcel of land included in the estate of his wife, but instead he was conscientious and included his own estate. When put together with all the other beloved deeds by everyone in Hawaii nei, this is measured as the most wise of them all, the height and breadth of its foundation will go on and bear forth much benefits for this lahui. There is but yet one thing to complete and to perfect the building of this memorial to the Kamehamehas, that being the righteousness of God’s words, the basis upon which the good and the blessings of the lahui will continue.

But Bishop’s help for our people is not done in his continued assistance to the memorial to the Kamehamehas and their foster children [keiki hookama] in the covenant of marriage of Charles R. Bishop.

¹The first paragraph was left out because it was somewhat irrelevant to this particular post, and was commentary on J. Kekipi and the Christian Science [Hoomana Karistiano Naauao] faith.

(Oiaio, 2/21/1896, p. 2)

NA KIA HOOMANAO.

Ka Oiaio Puka La, Buke I, Helu 37, Aoao 2. Feberuari 21, 1896.