Restoration Day celebration, day number 3! 1844.

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., the guests re-assembled at Mauna Kilika, and formed in nearly the same order of procession as the day before; being this day joined by the ladies of His Majesty’s naturalized subjects—Executive officers—to whom places were courteously assigned, immediately succeeding their Majesties. On this day, no order prescribed the dresses of the ladies, and they consulted their own fanices. The display was rich, and, in contrast with the uniforms of the soldiery, pleasing and highly creditable to their tastes. The entertainment went off with great spirit, and the utmost good humor prevailed. After the regular toasts to their Majesties, the King and Queen, to the Premier, and high officers of State, were given, others rapidly followed, succeeded by short and pithy addresses, which occasioned great applause. On this occasion, the Hon. G. P. Judd, Governor Young, Mr. Ii, J. Ricord, Esq., and Mr. J. F. B. Marshall, spoke: the latter gentleman alluded, with great feeling, to the high commission with which he had been entrusted by His Majesty, the past year, and the respect with which the Envoys of His Majesty, had been received abroad; and concluded with the following sentiment:—

“A speedy return, and hearty welcome to Mess. Haalilio and Richards.”

The dinner was prolonged for several hours, and the house illuminated. In the evening, four veterans of the father of his present Majesty, were introduced, who having seated themselves before the King and Queen, and Premier, after the old Hawaiian custom, with their calabash drums between their legs, commenced a mele, accompanying their song with rapid, and very skillful, manipulations upon their drums, and gesticulations expressive of the sentiment of their song, which was commemorative of the deeds of his warrior father, and in praise of himself and the Premier. These men are almost the only ones remaining who understand the chanting of their ancient meles after this manner, and one of them, from nineteen years disuse, failed before the conclusion. Liholiho, in his reign, kept them constantly about his person, but the taste for their exercises, seems to have almost altogether declined, as but little interest was manifested, by the guests generally, in the performance. It was interesting, however, as a relic of the past, and from its analogy to a custom of the Celtic tribes of Europe, in their era of barbarism. The pleasures of the evening were not confined to the walls of the banqueting house; a numerous crowd was assembled outside, diverted by the music of the band.

At 8 o’clock, P. M. a salute was fired from Punch-bowl, with very grand effect [not legible because of fold in paper] cloud rested over the hill, and when the guns belched forth their thunder in quick succession, lighting up the hill by their flashes, and shaking the houses beneath with their heavy reverberations, it required no lively imagination to fancy that the old crater had awakened from its slumber of ages, and was about to pour a fiery flood upon the town beneath.

Soon after, the troops were re-formed, and His Majesty and the court proceeded to the house of the young chiefs, where the company were very agreeably entertained by Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, the teachers of the Royal children; and by the princes and princesses themselves, by their performances on the piano, and social music, both of which was highly creditable to themselves, and gratifying to their parents. The Royal party next proceeded to the mansion of the Hon. Secretary of State. The band assembled in front of the house, playing lively dancing tunes, while the officers of the troops formed themselves into groups and danced with great vigor and animation.

The effect by torch-light was peculiarly striking: all, at intervals waving their swords on high, and joined by the soldiers, giving utterance to deafening cheers, which were borne in the stillness of the night, far and wide.

After experiencing the hospitality of the lady of the Secretary of State, the procession re-formed and marched at quick step towards his Majesty’s residence. The cheering in their progress through the streets was loud and enthusiastic. At 10 o’clock the company took leave of their Majesties.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

THIRD DAY, AUGUST 2D.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

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