Restoration Day celebration, day number 2! 1844.

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

Thursday morning, Aug. 1st, at 10 o’clock A. M.—a procession was formed of all the juvenile members of temperance societies to the number of one thousand eight hundred of all ages and both sexes. They were well dressed, and divided into companies bearing appropriate banners, marching in couples to the fort, where they were joined by Their Majesties, the King and Queen, Her Royal Highness the Premier, and the chief nobles and officers of the court and kingdom. Attended by the military, they marched to the stone church, which was crowded to excess, inside and out; doors, windows and every available space being occupied by the eager multitude; and a more pleasing sight than so many happy children, (with their gratified parents) zealous in the noble cause of temperance, and sustained both by the precept and example of the highest magnates of their country, was never witnessed at these Islands. The King and Premier both addressed the audience, and their remarks were received with fixed attention. It was remarked that his Majesty spoke with much spirit and feeling and with a very happy…

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 46)

SECOND DAY OF THE FESTIVAL, AUGUST 1ST.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1.—Number 12, Page 46. August 10, 1844.

…effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty’s Privy Council, then spoke, and commanded the attention of all present by his grace and eloquence. Mr. Ii is an orator by nature, and to native vigor of expression, adds the charm of polished and commanding action. We are sure, that none who understood the Hawaiian language, could fail of deriving great pleasure and profit from his remarks; and those who were unacquainted with it, scarcely less of the former from his peculiarly impressive manner. The address referred to the great and glorious change brought about by the adherence to the tee-total principle by the chiefs and people generally, and the striking contrast between the former periods of wild mis-rule and intemperance, and the bright days of order and prosperity that are now dawning upon the kingdom. All spoke with feeling, because it was a subject that came home to their hearts—bitter and sweet experience, both were theirs—the former, past—the latter, present. Dr. Winslow addressed the audience also, in some appropriate remarks and bestowed a high compliment upon the government and people, and also upon G. P. Judd, Esq., for the zeal and success with which he had labored in their cause. But want of space compells us to be brief. A temperance glee was sung by the young chiefs, accompanied by one of them on the piano, which afforded great satisfaction to their royal auditors. Rev. Mr. Armstrong asked the children if they were going to continue to keep the pledge. The thousands rose en masse, and made the lofty roof ring and ring again with their loud and enthusiastic “ae.” The whole exercises were of the most interesting nature, and we are happy to add, gave great pleasure to the strangers present. The procession then returned to the fort, and there dispersed.

At 4 o’clock, P. M., a procession was again formed at the Fort, to march to the Feast which was given to the subjects of His Majesty, in the same house as the day before. His Majesty’s household guards, in neat uniform—150 strong—headed the procession, commanded by Colonel Stephens; next came the band. Her Majesty, the Queen, supported by the King, and the Secretary of State. The Premier, attended by C. Kanaina and her pages, with kahilis. The Governess of Kauai, by Governor Young and Mr. Ii; the other female chiefs, according to their rank, attended by officers of the government, (on their right, the Royal standard bearers and guards: outside of them, and on both sides, His Majesty’s body guard) the governors, chiefs, and officers, generally, in full uniform, (the commanders of the soldiery, and the aids of Governor Kekuanaoa, on horseback,) and a long procession formed by those invited, (black being the costume of the ladies,) and escorted, on either side, by double files of soldiers, in white uniforms. The procession marched through the principal streets, which were crowded by the concourse of spectators, to Beretania, where the guests were seated at the feast, in nearly the same order as the day before. The first toast was

By Her Royal Highness, the Premier:—”His Hawaiian Majesty, Kamehameha III.”—”God save the King”, by the band;—21 guns, and [?????] cheers.

The second toast was

By the Secretary of State:—”Her Royal Highness, the Premier.” Music, and loud applause.

The third toast was

By the Attorney General:—”Her Majesty, Kalama, Queen of the Hawaiian Islands.” Music, and shouts of applause.

Great good humor prevailed, and toasts followed in quick succession.

His Majesty gave:—”The prospective King, Queen, Premier, and Rulers, of the Kingdom”,—which was received with loud cheers—three times three.

“The Hon. Secretary of State,”—”The Officers of the Government,”—”The absent Envoys, Messrs. Haalilio and Richards,”—and many other toasts, were drunk with great applause, and called forth several short, but spirited addresses.

“The Memory of ‘Kamehameha, the Great,'” standing, and in silence.

After remaining two hours at the table, His Majesty arose, the procession was reformed, and returned to the Fort, where the King was received with loud cheers by his subjects; after which the trops were dismissed, and the company dispersed.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 47)

effect. Mr. Ii, of his Majesty's...

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1,—Number 12, Page 47. August 10, 1844.

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One thought on “Restoration Day celebration, day number 2! 1844.

  1. By Her Royal Highness, the Premier:—”His Hawaiian Majesty, Kamehameha III.”—”God save the King”, by the band;—21 guns, and [?????] cheers.

    The omitted word is clearly “deafening.”

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