Multi-day Restoration Day celebration! 1844.

The 31st of July.

The Festivities of the 31st and the three following days—the Anniversary of the Restoration of the Hawaiian Flag by Admiral Thomas.

The morning of the 31st, was ushered in by a salute of 21 guns from the battery on Punch-bowl hill. At 10 o’clock, His Majesty, accompanied by the Queen, the Premier, the members of his Privy Council, the Governors of Oahu, Maui, and Kauai and the officers of his Government generally, under military escort, proceeded to the Stone Church [Kawaiahao Church], where the temperance festival was to be held. The church was tastefully decorated with evergreens, and numerous banners, bearing pictures and mottoes significant of the cause in which they were raised. The massive walls re-echoed the marshal strains of the band, as the Royal party proceeded up the aisles to a platform in front of the pulpit, on which seats had been arranged for the high dignitaries. The troops filed into the church and occupied the slips, and the people generally followed after, so that the church was filled to overflowing.—Rev. Mr. Bishop opened the meeting by a short address. His Majesty then rose, and gave a very spirited and pertinent speech, which was listened to with great attention. He was followed by her Royal Highness the Premier, and by the Hon. Secretary of State G. P. Judd, His Excellency, Gov. Kekuanaoa, and the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, with music in the intervals. The procession then returned to Mauna Kilika in the same order that it had left. The ships in the harbor displayed their flags in honor of the day: the U. S. Ship Warren wore the Hawaiian flag at her fore, and at noon her commander courteously fired a salute of 21 guns.

At 3 o’clock P. M., the large new house erected at Beretania for the occasion, was filled by the guests invited to the Royal feast. The house was prettily though simply decorated. Three tables, each prepared for 86 persons, ran nearly its whole length. At the upper end of the table of His Majesty, arranged transversely to the others. The coup d’œuil of the whole, with their bright array of glasses, was pleasing; and the effect was much more gratifying when the whole company was assembled. About 100 of the foreign residents, among whom was a very handsome representation of their ladies, and the officers of the U. S. Ship Warren were present. Of the Hawaiians, 200 were present; the ladies were dressed in white, the gentlemen in full dress and the officers in uniform. Shortly before 4 o’clock, their Majesties, the King and Queen, Her Royal Highness, the Premier, the members of the Privy Council, and the other high officers of the kingdom arrived, attended by the same military escort as in the morning. As soon as His Majesty was seated, the company took their seats according to the directions of the Master of Ceremonies for the occasion. On the right of His Majesty was the Premier and Mrs. G. P. Judd; on the left the Governess of Kauai. Opposite him sat the Queen, with Mr. Dudoit, Consul of France, and William Hooper, Esq. American Consul, on her right. On her left, were R. C. Wyllie, Esq., H. B. M.’s Pro-Consul, and Capt. Hull of the U. S. Ship Warren. The Hon. G. P. Judd occupied one end of the table, with the ladies of the American and French Consuls on either side of him; at the other end was H. M.’s Attorney General, J. Ricord, Esq., with the ladies of Gov. Young and William Paty, Esq. The other guests at his Majesty’s table, consisted of the High Chiefs, members of his Council, Executive Officers, J. F. B. Marshall and George Pelly, Esqs., representing the American and British residents. At the head of the middle table, was Gov. Kekuanaoa, the young chiefs being immediately next to him, and then the American Missionaries and their families, and the invited foreign guest.—The left hand table, at the head of which was A. Paki, was occupied by Hawaiian subjects; the one on the right hand—Gov. Young being at the head—by the Roman Catholic clergy, foreign guests and subjects indiscriminately.

The following regular toasts were given and drank standing.

1. By the Premier.—”His Majesty, Kamehameha III, King of the Hawaiian Islands.”—”God save the King,” by the band—and 21 guns from Punchbowl.

The three following, by the Hon. G. P. Judd—H. H. M.’s Secretary of State.

2. “His most Christian Majesty, Louis Philippe, King of the French.”—Music and 21 guns.

3. “Her most Gracious Majesty, Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland.”—”God save the Queen”—and 21 guns.

4. “The President of the United States.”—Hail Columbia—and 21 guns.

5. “Her Royal Highness, the Premier.”—Grand March.

6. By the Att’y. Gen.—”Her Majesty, Kalama,—Queen of the Hawaiian Islands.”

After which, Gov. Kekuanaoa proposed—”The Health of Admiral Thomas,”—which was enthusiastically received, and to which H. B. M.’s Pro-Consul, R. C. Wyllie, Esq.—in behalf of the gallant admiral, replied as nearly as we can remember, in the following terms:—

“In the absence of the British Consul General, and of any one else to speak for Admiral Thomas, it may not be out of place for me to state, that i will be pleasing to him, to know that he has not been forgotten on this occasion. I will take care to communicate to him that he has not been forgotten.

The Act of Restoration, commemorated on this day, will associate his name indellibly with the history of this young nation, in which, I can assure you, the Admiral takes the most lively interest.

It was a source of great gratification to him, after performing that act, to find that he had judged correctly of the just and liberal views of H. B. M.’s Government towards these Islands.

And I may add, that her Majesty, the Queen of England, and her government, only desire the prosperity and happiness of the Hawaiian people under the dynasty of King Kamehameha III., and his successors to the crown.”

His Majesty left the tables between six and seven, and the company then broke up.—This feast and the succeeding ones were conducted entirely on temperance principles, no wines of any kind being used.—Much credit is due to F. W. Thompson, our worthy host of the Mansion House, who provided the dinners—for the punctuality, and good order, observed in all the arrangements, and we may add, for the merit of the cookery likewise.

(Polynesian, 8/10/1844, p. 46.)

The 31st of July.

The Polynesian, New Series, Volume 1, Number 12, Page 46. August 10, 1844.

More on Restoration Day, 1843.

“THE VICTORY OF WRONGDOERS IS BUT FOR A MOMENT.”

Who does not know the truth of this statement? He must read the Bible; it is there that he will see the truth in this statement. What of Pharaoh [Parao], the ruler of Egypt [Aigupita], the one who overburdened and oppressed the Israelites? Did he not die at once, along with all of his warriors in the Red Sea? And with his quick death in the Red Sea, what happened to Moses and his people? Did they not sing, exalt, rejoice, and praise God for his saving them from the hands of their enemy? Read Exodus [Pukaana] chapter 14 and chapter 15, and there it will be clarified.

[Considering this particular outcome, this was quite a boost for Christianity.]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 27)

"O KA LANAKILA O KA POE HEWA, HE POKOLE IA."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 27. Augate 8, 1843.

Richard Thomas arrives today, 1843.

WARSHIP.

On the 26th of July, the British Warship named Dublin arrived. Read Admiral Thomas is the Captain. He is the commander-in-chief of the British Warships here in the Pacific Ocean.

When he received the document about Capt. Lord George Paulet, by way of the ship Victoria, and he heard clearly that the flag of Britain was raised at this archipelago, he quickly came to restore the kingdom to Kamehameha III. How wonderful indeed is his aloha for the king! and for the people as well.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 25)

MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 25. Augate 8, 1843.

Remember Restoration Day! 1896.

It would not be wrong of us to commemorate our La Hoihoi Ea, that being this coming Friday, the 53rd year from when George Paulet [Lo Keoki] trespassed upon Hawaii nei on February 25, 1843, and we were blessed once more by Admiral Thomas on that day the very same year. If we do indeed celebrate it, we should do it with decorum and peace.

(Makaainana, 7/27/1896, p. 4)

E hewa ole no ia kakou...

Ka Makaainana, Buke VI—-Ano Hou, Helu 4, Aoao 4. Iulai 27, 1896.

 

Warships, 1843.

SIX MEN-OF-WAR

There are six men-of-war [manuwa] docked in Honolulu, on this day, the 4th of August. Three of them are from Britain, and three are from America.

Here are the names of the British ships. (1.) Dublin, a frigate; Rear Admiral R. Thomas is the officer. The ships has 50 cannons.

(2.) Carysfort is a small frigate; its captain is Lord George Paulet; this ship has 26 cannons.

(3.) Hazard is a Sloop; Bell is the captain, and it has 16 cannons.

These are the names of the American ships.

(1.) United States is a frigate; Commodore Jones is the officer. The ship has 52 cannons.

(2.) Constellation is a frigate; Commodore Kearney is the officer; it has 46 cannons.

(3.) Cyane is a Sloop; its captain is C. K. Stribling; it has 20 cannons.

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

EONO MOKU MANUWA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 8, 1843.

Admiral Richard Thomas honored once again, 1857.

BY AUTHORITY.

By order of the King, the Chief [Kamehameha IV], it is hereby proclaimed that in order to show the aloha of his Nation at the passing of Admiral Richard Thomas, the one who returned the islands of Hawaii and the Hawaiian Flag on the 31st of July, 1843 to the King recently deceased, seventeen minute guns [pu minuke] will be fired from Puowaina [the fort at Punchbowl] at 12 o’clock on this day, and the Alii will go into mourning and all of the officers of the King’s government shall wear black crepe [hoailona kanikau] on their left arm for fifteen days.

M. KEKUANAOA, Chief Chamberlain [Haku Puuku],

Office of the Chamberlain [Oihana Puuku], 12th of Dec., 1857.

(Hae Hawaii, 12/16/1857, p. 150.)

NA KE AUPUNI.

Ka Hae Hawaii, Buke 2, Ano Hou.—Helu 38, Aoao 150. Dekemaba 16, 1857.

Restoration Celebration at Luakaha, in Nuuanu, 1843.

FEAST OF THE KING.

Here is the food that M. Kekuanaoaʻs overseers [konohiki] contributed for the feast of the King upland of Nuuanu at Luakaha on the 3rd of August.

Mahuka, 2 pigs, 3 chickens, 53 coconuts. Maalaiki, 1 chicken. Hanakauluna, 2 chicken. Kanana, 1 chicken. Nui, 1 pig, 1 basket of sweet potato. Kumupala, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 5 sweet potato, 5 taro. Kauwai, 1 chicken. Nalapauwahiole, 2 chicken, 6 taro. Kaluahinenui, 1 lau [400] fish, 36 coconuts. Mu, 1 pig. Kanoa, 37 coconuts. Makahopu, 1 chicken. Nailimai, 1 chicken. Nahalelauhala, 2 chicken. Puuloa, 1 chicken. Kalalawalu, 1 pig. Kaohe, 1 chicken. Kaleimakalii, 1 chicken. Kepu, 2 chicken. Kinopu, 1 pig. Hueu, 2 chicken. Napohaku, 1 chicken. Kaaua, 2 pigs, 1 chicken, 1 turkey, 2 ducks, 120 fish. Koiamai, 1 chicken. Nalino, 2 chicken. Kamaukoli, 1 pig, 4 poi, 120 fish. Paele, 1 chicken, 5 baskets of sweet potato [kiki uala], 10 taro. Kahakuailii, 1 chicken. Kaaipuna, 1 chicken, 1 duck. Polikua, 2 pigs. Kikaha, 1 pig. Kekoaalohiu, 1 pig. Kaiwi, 1 chicken. Kaniho, 1 pig, 2 poi. Kawahinelawaia, 1 chicken. Kahanamoku, 1 pig. Kapoo, 1 chicken. Kaluhia, 3 chicken. Makahuluhulu, 1 chicken. Keliikumoku, 1 poi. Kokahi, 1 pig. Honaunau, 1 pig, 55 taro.

Here is the food that Kamehameha’s very own konohiki contributed for his feast.

Wiliama, T. 1 pig, 2 poi, 8 fish, 1 chicken. G. P. Judd, 2 pig, 7 poi, 8 fish. Kanoa, 1 pig. Huakini, 1 pig. Wahahee, 1 pig, 6 taro. Kekai, 1 poi, 50 fish. Kanaina, 1 pig. Kalama, 1 pig, 1 chicken, 6 taro, 1 poi, 1 basket of sweet potato. Namakeha, 1 chicken, 1 poi. Keohokalole, 2 pig, 27 coconuts. Kalaimoku, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaaoao, 1 poi. Kalunaaina, 1 pig, 1 poi. Kamakahonu, 30 fish. Namauu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Piikoi, 2 poi, 1 duck, 1 pig, 10 fish. Papa, 4 sweet potato. Kealakai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Nakoa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kaeo, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kailiwai, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kelama, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kanewili, 1 poi. Kapu, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Koa, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kahoe, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Lahilahi, 1 pig, 1 poi. Haole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Ulunui, 4 fish. Ulualoha, 1 pig. Kale, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Hinau, 1 poi. Makole, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kuaana, 2 poi, 20 fish. He 60 fish. Kuke, 1 pig, 1 poi. Punahele, 1 poi, 10 fish. Alapai, 1 pig. Kala, 1 poi, 1 pig. Kahaaualii, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Kamokuholohewa, 1 poi. Kekuaiwahia, 1 poi, 1 chicken. Puhalahua, 1 pig, 1 chicken. Ioane Ii, 2 pig, 1 chicken, 2 turkey. Kanina, 1 pig. Kaawahua, 1 poi, grapes. Maalahia, 1 poi, grapes. Kaapuiki, 1 chicken. Kaihiwa, 1 pig. Keaniani, 1 pig. Kaaha, 1 pig. Kaunuohua, 300 lemons.

Those were the konohiki who contributed to the king’s celebratory feast, and there were many konohiki of the King and M. Kekuanaoa who did not contribute to this celebratory feast of the king for the return of the land to him. And these konohiki who did not contribute, are without aloha, and without joy for the return of the nation to our king.

At perhaps 11 o’clock was when the King went up with his men in their …

(Nonanona, 8/5/1843, p. 28)

AHAAINA A KE LII.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 28. Augate 8, 1843.

glory; and the haole of the warships, in their best; and the musicians. And when they reached the uplands and entered into the grass house [hale pili], that was when the celebration began with music.

When the food was ready on the table spread over with greenery, it was 32 feet long and 2 feet wide. And the amount of food placed on this table was: 60 pigs, 300 chicken, 40 turkeys, 58 ducks. With all the supplies necessary to prepare this food; Kamamalu 1 set of supplies [? ukana], Lota 1 ukana; Liholiho 1 ukana; Mose 1 ukana; Lunalilo 1 ukana.

The number of servants was over forty per ukana. There were 250 plates, 250 knives, 250 forks, 250 bowls, 250 cups, 150 spoons. And the number of those who ate were probably over 250; there were two prominent haole: Commodore Kearny from the American man-of-war, and the head of the United States warships in East India. Ana Admiral R. Thomas of the British warship, the head of the British warships in the Pacific.

There were four flags raised above the troops while the feast went on: one British flag, one American flag, one French flag, and one Hawaiian flag; and the king’s standard stood near to where the king was.

When the  feast was over, most on foot went back; all together the men, women, and children totaled 2000 or perhaps more. The number of horses were 270, and the riding on the horses on the return was by fours, with two flags and the musicians, while from their mouths came hip hip hurrah [hipi hipi hulo] with great joy all the way until Haliimaile. Written by I. H. Paehewa, Secretary

The Fort. August 5, 1843.

[Anyone know how “ukana” is being used here? Calabash?]

(Nonanona, 8/8/1843, p. 29)

"...kou hanohano..."

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 6, Aoao 29. Augate 5, 1843.

English Song for the Restoration of the Kingdom, 1893.

[The Hawaiian Historical Society, on their Facebook page, posted this awesome image of the English lyrics of the “Restoration Anthem,” which it seems was sung at the luau given by Kamehameha III at Luakaha!]

Restoration Anthem.

Tune. God save the King

Hail! to our rightful king!
We joyful honor bring,
This day to thee!
Long live your Majesty!
Long reign thou dynasty!
And for posterity,
The sceptre be

Hail! to the worthy name!
Worthy his country’s fame!
Thomas, the brave!
Long shall they virtues be,
Shrined in our memory
Who came to set us free
Quick oe’r the wave!

Hail! to our Heavenly King!
To thee our thanks we bring,
Worthy of all.
Loud, we thine honors raise!
Loud, is our song of praise!
Smile on our future days,
Sovereign of all.

July 31, 1843

Sung at the great cold water luau given by H.H.M. Kamehameha III, in Nuuanu to several thousands of natives and all the Foreigners including the officers of 4 ships of war. For which Admiral Thomas thanked the ladies and gent who did him the honor.

[unclear phrase]  August 20, 1843

Song for the Restoration of the Kingdom, 1843.

MELE HOI HOU ANA.

(Leo, ‘E Ola ke Alii i ke Akua.’)

1.  E ko makou alii!
Mahalo ‘ka moi,
I keia la!
E mau kou ola nei!
E mau kou aupuni!
No na hanauna hoi,
I oni paa.

2.  Nani! ka inoa maikai!
Me kona aina nae!
Toma ke koa!
Mahalo ‘kou maikai,
Kou wikiwiki mai!
Maluna o ke kai,
E kuu ‘na pau!

3.  Hiilani i ke Lii!
Iehova ka Moi,
E hapai no;
Nui ke kupinai!
Nui ke mele nae!
I mau ka pomaikai
Ia oe no.

Honolulu, Oahu, Iulai 31, 1843.

(Nonanona, 9/5/1843, p. 44)

MELE HOI HOU ANA.

Ka Nonanona, Buke 3, Pepa 8, Aoao 44. Sepatemaba 5, 1843.

La Hoihoi Ea, 1843.

THE RESTORATION.

This day, July thirty first, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, will hereafter be referred to, as memorable in the history of the Sandwich Islands Government. The existence of the Government has often been threatened, but it has been most signally preserved. It is easy to trace the superintending Providence of God in every stage of its advancement. Many months since persons acquainted with its condition were fully aware that a most important crisis was approaching. It was seen that if the nation continued independent favorable influences must be exerted on the other side of the world. While the most amicable negotiations were going forward, an English Man of War anchors in this harbor. Immediate hostile action was threatened unless the Government yielded to certain demands. Those having been acceded to, others more exhorbitant were forth coming. The King finding himself involved in difficulties, which were not of his own making, under a reservation most reluctantly made a Provisional Cession of his dominions to the Queen of England.

He signed the treaty of cession while bathed in tears. At 3 oʻclock, P. M. Feb. 25, 1843, the National Flag was taken down, while that of England was raised. Never shall we forget the day. To the native population and a majority of the Foreign Residents of all nations, it was a day of sadness. They knew not as their eyes would ever again behold the Flag of Kamehameha III., waving over his rightful dominions. Whoever shall write an accurate history of the period which has since elpased must draw some dark shades to the picture.

The arrival of H. M. S. Dublin, and the negotiations which have taken place between the Admiral and the King, present affairs in a different aspect, which to most in this community is as unexpected as joyful.

The King is to receive a full restoration of his rights, privileges and and dominions. This morning, a public recognition of this restoration will take place. At 10 oʻclock, A. M., His Majesty Kamehameha III., will appear upon the plain East of the town. His standard will be unfurled under a general salute; which being finished, the National Flag will be displayed on both Forts, and be saluted by H. B. M. Ships with 21 guns each, which will be answered from the Forts. At one oʻclock, public religious services will be held in the Stone Church. At three oʻclock, His Majesty will embark to visit Richard Thomas, Rear Admiral of the White, H. B. M. Ship Dublin.

If reports are true, there will be other salutes and exhibitions of public joy! No doubt many hearty wishes and fervent prayers will be uttered for the prosperity of the King, and the welfare of the Government. To the latest generation may a lineal and worthy successor of His Majesty Kamehameha III., sit upon the throne of his ancestors. All genuine lovers of the Sandwich Islands Government, here and throughout the world, will cherish in grateful recollection the memory of Rear Admiral THOMASʻ timely interferance and noble deeds in behalf of a feeble, but well disposed people, who are struggling amid many hindrances to preserve their National Independence.

[This is from a special edition of the Advocate and Friend published on the very day of the restoration. The rest of the coverage can be seen here on the Mission Houses Museum page! Mahalo to Dwight Baldwin (descendant of the Temperance Advocate, and Seamenʻs Friend editor Samuel C. Damon) via Nathan Napoka for reminding me that there are indeed Hawaii newspapers other than Hawaiian-Language Newspapers.]

(Advocate and Friend, 7/31/1843, p. 38)

THE RESTORATION.

Advocate and Friend. (Extra). July 31, 1843, p. 38.